17

What you've been sent is the radiator for the diesel variant - as opposed to what appears to be the 1.25l Zetec petrol engine in your first diagram. You're correct in that the "main" radiator connections are the same between the two (Despite the confusing placement of the lower hose on the second diagram it is the same hose and hooks up in the same place ...


7

It's possible that the impeller blades on the water pump are either compromised or gone completely. I ran into a somewhat similar situation with a Chrysler. The engine would not overheat driving. Idling it would overheat eventually but it took a long tome to do so. The heater core would not get hot no matter what I did. The thermostat was already replaced. ...


4

You have air in your engines cooling system/radiator If you have air in your cooling system it will expand as you drive the vehicle and the engine gets hot. When the air expands it eventually finds it's way to the highest point in the cooling system which is the radiator cap. The radiator cap has a spring loaded seal within it. When the pressure in your ...


3

Overheating can be caused by a few things: Coolant isn't circulating - pump, thermostat or other blockage Insufficient coolant. Leaks, getting burned or air pockets. System isn't holding pressure (cap or a leak) Fans not working correctly. (Easiest to check) Some possibilities are: Radiator cap, as you mentioned, which keeps the system from being properly ...


2

What @blacksmith37 says is true, kinda. You could stick the hose into a catch bottle, and that would tell you that coolant is coming out during high load, high temp conditions. That's it. The coolant in that bottle WILL not go back into the radiator during cool down, like in a more modern cooling system. What makes that work in a modern flow back overflow ...


1

I don't have experience with this, but in my opinion you should drain and refill it. Looks like somebody on Quora made the same mistake as you already. It would probably depend on the specific chemistry of your antifreeze and washer fluid, but it does seem like there are valid concerns of damaged seals and hoses, as well as degraded engine cooling. Certain ...


1

This could be a sign of a blown head gasket. This would push combustion gases into the coolant. Find a mechanic who owns a co2-testing device and have your coolant tested for traces of co2. Example of co2 tester


1

That sounds like the transmission cooler has failed - the trans cooler has the hot oil passing through it next to water so the water absorbs the heat. This may be a separate radiator or built into the main engine cooling radiator. This needs to be checked, as if the water is getting into the transmission oil it can damage the transmission.


1

There is no such thing as an overflow tank with a pressure cap, if it has a pressure cap, its called an expansion tank. There are 3 different types of tanks. An expansion tank is plumbed in and always receives the same pressure as the radiator. A recovery tank works on the hot/cold pushing fluid back and forth principle through a radiator cap with 2 seals....


1

For Q1 , if the overflow tank has the pressure cap on it the yes coolant will be drawn into the system. Otherwise the seal on the radiator cap will prevent flow in reverse. Q2 not really - if you have low fluid in the radiator then you need to top it up. The fluid does not change in volume very much between cold and hot - the overflow tank is to deal with ...


1

If the coolant system is leaking water or air, the water will boil more easily. The water coolant system in a car is designed to be under a certain amount of pressure. The pressure increases the boiling point of water so that it can safely reach temperatures above 100C without boiling. It's not much pressure - usually around 10-15 PSI, but its enough to ...


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