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8

tl dr: You possibly could, but why not just do it the right way? Get the right tools for the job and do it right from the get go. This way you won't have to worry about anything falling off while driving down the road. First, get the Honda hub socket which Lisle makes. You can get it (or a close facsimile) just about anywhere. It's Lisle PN: 77260 and ...


7

This is compression of air working against you Over the course of two crank revolutions for your Camry you have 4 cylinders compressing air and fuel. When you see the engine get to a point of rotation and it rotates backward a bit after releasing the starter, that's air acting as a spring and resisting. If you take your sparkplugs out of the engine it ...


6

Crack it loose and then have them re-tighten to 70 lbs, this way you can remove it when you get home without risking it coming loose during the drive.


6

I tried numerous things. This is how I finally got myself out of the predicament: I jacked up the engine and then hammered out the socket wrench. Other things I tried or thought of trying: applying vise grips to the socket, didn't work jamming something thin, yet strong in between the wheel well trying to switch the ratchet in reverse, didn't work cut off ...


6

For completeness, if you haven't tried it yet, see if you can rotate the socket/bolt at all by hand to tighten it back in some. Now that you've broken the bolt open it may move by hand. If not, the socket wall should be able to hold up to some moderate clamping force so I would try a set of vice grips or other locking pliers if you have those available. ...


5

I wouldn't hesitate using an impact to loosen the crankshaft pulley retaining bolt. The reason for this is because even though there is an impact involved, it is a rotary impact. The crank itself would incur no damage, nor would the bearings. The bearings take a worse beating during normal operation than they would during crankshaft pulley retaining bolt ...


5

If this looks like your water pump, then yes you can: The tilt in the pulley is caused not from a broke shaft, but from a worn bushing which the shaft rides upon. This is just one of the symptoms which shows up when the pump is dying a short miserable death. As the bushing wears out, there is created more and more space (slop) which allows the shaft to lilt ...


5

There is a way to do it. You put a wrench on the pulley bolt and block the other end against the floor or the frame. Then you use the starter motor to turn the engine (DO NOT START IT, JUST TURN IT) for at most one or two revolutions of the crank. Just enough to break the bolt loose. A couple of things to watch out for: Be sure the wrench is setup ...


5

I usually use a flat blade screwdriver sideways against the face of the pulley. Jam it either between the centre bolt and one of the three or four you are removing or jam it over old bolt and under the other. Hard to explain but this picture kind of demonstrates what I mean;


5

Looking at the large bolt holding the alternator (closest in the picture), then I assume the alternator will pivot on that if you release the smaller bolt on the other side of the alternator - just visible with a piece of metal that has a slot in it. That looks to be how you adjust the tension of the belt.


4

It is probably going to be one of your pulley wheels, but I doubt it's the pump. If it's brand new, they usually don't make any noise at all. It is either going to be one of either the idler or tensioner pulleys. And if you don't know which one is which, if you eliminate all of the other pulleys which have things attached to them, you should have one ...


4

I think both are stating the same thing, but telling it differently. Basically what I mean by this is, spinning freely does not need to mean it will continue to spin without stopping, but rather spins without binding. The main thing to look for in these pulleys is if, when turned, they are completely smooth to the touch and turn without much resistance, they ...


3

The raised rear lip is used to align the timing belt. It only needs one of these to keep the belt aligned, thus the difference.


3

Well, you can ... so long as you don't have the same result as happened to a friend of mine. He was driving along when there was a sudden "clunk" and the ignition warning light came on. The obvious guess was "broken alternator drive belt," so he pulled over and stopped to investigate. Indeed, there was no drive belt to be seen. There was also no ...


3

The horrific squealing sound is your belt rubbing on on some pulley. Typically this means that either The belt is bad. The belt is loose. Some pulley has seized. If the belt is cracked or feels like its dried out then its probably time for a new belt. There's also a product called belt conditioner that you can spray on the belt. If this fixes the squealing ...


3

Wrap the serpentine belt completely around either ribbed pulley part and hold it on one side to gain purchase (grab both sides of the belt in one place with one hand). Believe me when I say this will give you more than enough purchase to get it done. If you do not have enough purchase by just using your hand, try wrapping the belt around the pulley and ...


3

From your comment, it looks like the alternator has seized. I was easily able to get the belt off till it was the alternators turn, the belt was melted onto the alternator, and the pulley was the one that couldn’t spin Unfortunately you will need to either get the alternator reconditioned or get a new one fitted.


2

I eventually discovered there are basically two ways to do this. One is to use the part FossilizedCarlos mentioned, but you must also get an alternator spacer set, or else the brackets do not help much. I had previously purchased the bracket set but couldn't figure out how it was supposed to help. The spacer set is the missing link, although they are hard ...


2

If my calculations are correct and my SWAG (silly wild @$$ guess) of how much your ML350's belt contacts the power steering pump pulley, you will need a belt which is ~15.75mm longer (or 1.5cm) than what you have now. Here is my reasoning: This picture should represent your serpentine belt configuration: Pulley #4 is the power steering pump. You can see ...


2

I take it the above picture of the fan/pulley on the vehicle is not your vehicle, but a photo of the same thing from another vehicle? If it is your vehicle, wrap a belt completely around either ribbed pulley part and hold it on one side to gain purchase (grab both sides of the belt in one place with one hand). Believe me when I say this will give you more ...


2

You should check belt tension and visually inspect the pulleys for rubber deposits. You can check pulleys by applying a load to the pulley and spinning it. You probably need to include which transfer case you have on the vehicle by looking at the stamped plate. How much vacuum is "little vacuum"? If you have a NVG231 there should be engine vacuum (roughly ...


2

I'm not sure which pulley you're talking about, but would assume it's one of two: idler or tensioner. This is the pulley system of the 97 Lumina (should be the same for the 3.1 or 3.4 engine): Since this setup doesn't have an idler pulley, it would most likely be the tensioner pulley which is not aligning (if not the tensioner, please tell me which one and ...


2

A technique I use is to tighten the bolts while holding the pulley by hand. Then install the belt. The tension of the belt will hold the pulley so you can finish tightening the bolt to the required spec.


2

You need to find another way of stopping the pulley from turning. Are there any holes in it you could use to wedge it with? One technique I have used is to wedge a bit of bar diagonally between two of the bolts, then (un)tighten the others, rotate and repeat...


2

The A/C compressor has a clutch mechanism that allows the compressor to be turned on and off. It is therefore normal to see the belt turning without the compressor running. When the A/C computer wants the compressor to run, it sends an electrical signal to the compressor which operates the clutch. You should be able to hear a click as the clutch is ...


2

Absolutely you'll see it bouncing slightly. The reason is, the belt will stretch and contract slightly as the engine speeds up/slows down. The tensioner provides two different functions: Provides tension to keep the serpentine belt tight during operation Takes up slack which might be introduced as the belt gets older Well, there's a third thing to consider,...


1

Don't think you can move the pump in/out but the pully can be moved using a special tool to remove and a not so special tool to install( bolt and nut and washers) to press pully in


1

Some pulleys, while they have a woodruff key, are fitted with a taper and that, with the high torque of the pulley bolt is sufficient to prevent movement. Others have a sliding fit and are just held with the compression of the pulley bolt.


1

If space permits, use an impact wrench to loosen them. If the impact wrench has some kind of torque-limiting capability then you can use then to tighten the bolts as well.


1

The water pump pulley is usually bolted to the pump, and can be re-used.


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