35

The 1000 mile oil change is a holdover from days of yore. It falls into the "my grandfather /father (add appropriate generation) said you should always"... Add what ever urban myth was part of the lesson. Part of the reasoning was due to the Moly-Lube that was part of the engine assembly process. The theory was that the assembly lube was thick enough to clog ...


18

Do what it says in the owner's manual. FWIW the manual said the first oil change from new on my current car was at 18,000 miles, not 1,000. I queried that with the dealer and the reply was "yes, that's correct." Nothing bad has happened after 100,000 miles (and it still only burns half a liter of oil in the 18,000 miles between changes, just like it did ...


12

There is nothing you need to do other than drive the car, that includes adding fuel stabilizer. The main concern with cars sitting for long periods is the battery, if you don't drive it enough it will lose charge and not start, but that's not the only consideration for the long term. Driving the car heats and circulates your fluids, helping to keep seals, ...


8

As jwh20 states, there's a lot of factors here. However, 20 minutes of continuous driving should be enough to get rid of any condensation in the oil in most vehicles. While the coolant may take five minutes to get to temperature, it takes the oil longer. I say "most vehicles" because there are always those outliers which will take more driving. The exhaust ...


4

If your mechanic says 'Timing chains are for life and require no maintenance' then please find a new mechanic. There are loads of examples of timing chains that are designed for life but suffer from early failure of some sort whether its stretching, snapping, a tensioner or guide failing or anything else. Examples include: BMW N47 2.0D - Probably the most ...


3

I can't say that I have ever seen a hard-and-fast answer to this because there are many variables. Things like the engine's normal operating temperature, how much moisture we're talking about, etc. I've heard and read that about an hour of driving AFTER you get the engine to operating temperature will be sufficient to drive out excess moisture. From ...


3

Several additional things that need consideration: The battery should be fully charged. If not charged fully, the electrolyte may freeze. Don't try charging a frozen battery! If you have any reason to believe it's not fully charged, drive a really long trip (ideally 2 hours), or purchase a charger. Do note that cold batteries require a higher charging ...


2

Small cracks like those in the picture are, in my experience, normal. Although I can't be certain just by looking at a photo, the tread depth seems pretty OK too, so there should still be enough life left in your tyres - provided they're not too old, as already stated in the answer by Paulster2.


2

It really depends on how old they are. You state your vehicle is two years old (or at least I'm assuming that). Your tires could be much older, so you'll have to determine the date code on the tire itself. Tires should be no older than 10 years, while some manufacturers state six years is the maximum. This usually doesn't come into play as tires wear out (...


2

Maintenance for these types of situations aren't going to be any different than doing it any other time ... other than it will need to be done more often. More miles = More maintenance more often. There are some things which can be done to mitigate this effect, such as: Use an oil which will last longer. Amsoil (12k miles or 12 months, whichever comes ...


2

My guess is it's dielectric grease to prevent corrosion. Also, was there rust in the pivot area? Sometimes you add grease there to improve the pivot ability


2

If the 18650 batteries are not being discharged, they will maintain their charge fairly readily. Doing what you are suggesting by ensuring they are fully charged at least once a month will maintain their health. Lithium Ion batteries do have an expected lifespan of two to three years or 300-500 charge cycles, whichever comes first. According to this document:...


2

No need to worry about your car's life. Its safe against COVID-19 pandemic. And do take care of yourself and your loved ones 😃 Nevertheless, apart from short drives, drive your car for atleast 16km or 10miles once or twice every month, in each single run, that would be enough. Otherwise, start your car engine in well-ventilated space for atleast 30-45 ...


2

It all pivots around water's boiling point of 212F (100C) at standard temperature and pressure (close enough to standard outdoor conditions). Your thermostat has a setting of 160, 180, 190 or as high as 210. Note that this is near the boiling point of water at STP, but, the cooling system is pressurized. You can see the coolant temperature on the ...


1

In short - is it the revs or simply the duration that is going to do the job? Will it charge 'better' at high revs or am I just wasting fuel for nothing? Mostly, for cars with a reasonable alternator, it's the duration. Although the alternator will produce more power at high revs, if you don't turn on all the electrical accessories, the power produced at ...


1

4 is the only option, many times I have advised clients that a minimum of 10 or 15 minutes at around 2000 to 2500rpm is needed just to put the starting energy back into the battery and that is without having wipers, headlights rear window heater etc So you need to give it a good run once a week making sure that you minimise electrical use. If you can’t then ...


1

Greetings from another Minnesotan! For the most part, cars are designed to be able to take weather conditions, so I personally wouldn't be too worried. There are a few things to watch out for in exceptionally cold conditions like the next few weeks here: Starting the car. The problem here is that batteries don't like cold, so if you've had problems with ...


1

Replacing the tensioner assembly would be a good idea as it usually has a bearing in it, given the age and probable mileage... I don't see any need to replace any of the other pulleys unless they have been damaged.


1

Wrap the ones you don't want to replace, don't wrap the ones that you'd like to replace. I personally don't like to replace factory wiring, so I'd wrap anything the rodents may possibly reach. I'd also think about protecting the smaller vacuum hoses.


1

Do use the correct oil specification, as specified by the manufacturer. These extended oil change intervals typically depend on the oil spec being correct. As an example of another approach, Toyota is not so picky on the oil specifications, but has only 15 000 km oil change interval. I think the reasoning behind long oil change intervals is that engine is ...


1

The owner's manual for 2013 Mazda3 specifies two different maintenance schedules: Schedule "A" for normal use Schedule "B" for severe use Schedule A, normal use, calls for the drive belts every 37,500 mi / 60,000 km. See page 8-5 in the manual. Schedule B, severe use, calls for the drive belts every 35,000 mi / 56,000 km. See page 8-7 in the manual. ...


1

From what I remember from an article which I don't have to hand, idling a cold engine is bad practice, old or new. If your intention is to warm the oil, driving gently away puts a greater load on the engine and therefore generates more heat which brings the oil to operating temperature quicker. Some vehicles, especially diesels, can take upto 20 minutes to ...


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