14

The purpose of the fuse is to limit the current in the wire to prevent it from overheating. That could cause the insulation to melt or even start a fire. The other components in the circuit will (should) also selected to handle the same load. So, for example, the accessory outlet should also be able to handle a 20A load. The bottom line is that nothing in ...


13

Don't go with that model for automotive use. It passes through the "12v" input directly to the motherboard and drives, meaning you'll be delivering ~14v with the engine running, and all sorts of ugly voltages during cranking, near-stall, etc. situations. I would highly recommend this more expensive model: http://www.mini-box.com/M3-ATX-DC-DC-ATX-Automotive-...


11

The fuse is for the entire circuit. There may be other things on that circuit, sharing that 20A fuse. Also, the gauge of wires used in a circuit is part of the "safe" current limits (maybe why your 12V outlet has a 10A limit), while the fuse is there more for current "spikes" rather than steady loads. I'd stick to the manufacturer's recommendation of a ...


10

Why don't you connect it to the battery directly? Do you know, that mechanical contact with metal springs inside lighter plugs is not very reliable? It has relatively big resistance and will be heating during flow of such high current for a relatively long time. What can potentially result in melting surrounded plastic panels and even cause fire if you ...


7

On my car, the lighter (power) outlet is switched with the ignition, so it is not directly connected to the battery, so you would not be able to charge the battery through that connector if the ignition is off (and perhaps not if the ignition is on.) Perhaps, on very old cars, the lighter outlet was powered at all times, so could possibly be used to charge ...


7

ANSWER: Pretty unstable. Connect a voltmeter to your ciggy lighter socket, and watch it while starting and running the car. It will be ~12.5V when the motor is off, up to 14.5V while just started, and once the battery is topped off by the alternator the voltage will drop to around 12.5-13.0V for warm running. Also try turning your high beams and AC on to ...


6

Since you are talking about, on the base side, an outlet having 120v/20A, I'll assume you are talking about here in the States, as I don't know what's going on with the rest of the world, but voltages and amperages are going to be different elsewhere. I don't know what's going to be standard here for electric vehicle plug-ins, but I believe part of your ...


6

You should not notice any difference. Here's why: 1 hp = 746 W. This means that 60 W is 0.08 hp. The worst possible scenario from a load perspective is at idle. Assuming the engine is outputting a measly 5 hp at idle, the extra load would work out to 1.6 % of this value. The change in fuel consumption is barely sensible.


5

2 solutions: (1) Use a tightest fit rubber 'O' rings around the plug - available from http://www.amazon.co.uk/Assorted-Rings-Plumbing-Rubber-Thread/dp/6040360860 - see pink bands on the image below. (2) Use a short length of plastic-coated WIRE or a WIRE cable tie like those small black ones you get around a power cable when you unbox a new appliance (...


5

If the outlet is directly connected to the battery then it should be possible. Make sure to connect the solar panel through a charge controller configured for the chemistry of you car battery, so the charging will stop as soon as the battery is full. This protects the battery and the cars electronics. Adding another load should be no problem, there is just ...


4

I would go with the more expensive one in this case. Typical output of a "good" system is in the neighborhood of 13.1vdc. Depending on the alternator and how much it needs to put out to recharge the battery, it could be upwards of 14vdc (or maybe a touch higher). The power output from the 12v outlet source is going to reflect what the alternator is putting ...


4

The voltage available on the "Accessory" circuits on some modern (last 10 years, at least) can be pretty stable at 12-12.5V. Ignition circuits, not so much (9-14V). To be safe, however, you should measure with a fast acting (ie, analog) voltmeter on the cigarette lighter in the following conditions: Key on, engine off Key on, engine cranking (likely it's ...


4

Your problem is probably a ground loop. This means that the ground path from the laptop to radio has less resistance than the ground path from the laptop to the cigarette liter. This causes the laptop to try and ground through the audio cord which causes the problem. This can be caused by a bad/poor inverter or by a bad/poor power supply. The suggested ...


4

Went to the mechanic, and the voltage looked good at 14,4v +- when everything (car, airco, lights, radio) were on. Looks like my multimeter is busted. Need to buy a new 9v battery for my multimeter to test if that fixes the offset, or I'll try to calibrate my multimeter. Anyways, always test with another multimeter if in doubt.


4

On a properly designed circuit it should be safe to plug in a 20-amp device in the lighter port - the fuse is supposed to be the weakest link in the circuit so the port's wires should be able to handle at least 20A. This doesn't mean it will work, as there may be other stuff on that circuit that would draw current as well so that the fuse may blow even if ...


4

This is why concepts like Tesla's Powerwall will be valuable. Instead of uprating the socket and wiring to your garage, a storage battery will only need a "standard" utility power connection and then a relatively short big-fat lead to the car's power receptacle. So the battery slowly charges up at cheap rates, and has a lot of spare power to dump into the ...


4

There's a lot in your question, so let's look at it in parts: My vehicle's cigarette lighter outlet is limited to 10 amps output. If charging were limited to less than 10 amps, would solar panel -> charge controller -> cigarette lighter outlet work for charging a car battery. Technically, yes. Realistically: not a great idea. Generally speaking, ...


3

With inverters you also have to take into consideration the efficiency of the inverter itself when calculating power requirement. For example: 12V outlet is rated at about 10A or 120W. Inverter is 87% efficient. 120W * .87 = 104.4 W =Max size of inverter to use is 100W You can use a battery isolator -check at places that sell equipment for RV's. A ...


3

It depends what you're going to be plugging into it - whether you'll be plugging and unplugging stuff regularly, and how long the leads of the things you are using are... Under the passenger seat could work, as could inside or underneath the glovebox. When I bought my current car, I found that a previous owner had wired one in behind the fusebox cover (...


3

By far the most common electrical problem, especially in cases like this where "mysterious" things happen, is a bad ground. They're usually very hard to find but very easy to fix once found. Basically you want to use a multimeter to measure the connection between the negative battery terminal and different places on your car that should be grounded, like the ...


3

One way round your problem would be too have a second battery, together with diode pack and wiring to charge it independantly. If your intention is too camp out in remote areas, you really dont want to saddle the vehicles system with any loads. Alternatively a generator for your machine. A continuous 6amp load overnight is quite a high demand on a regular ...


2

I was having this issue and spent some time and even blew a fuze trying to rig a solution before I figured out a really stupidly easy one. If you have an inch of electrical tape, that is all you need! The trick is to twist it so that it is firm like a twig. Then use it as a wedge by simply pressing it to your plugin and gently but firmly push into the outlet....


2

Certainly plugs vary in their quality and ability to stay put. However, I am certain there are differences in the socket diameters as fitted to different makes of vehicles. My Honda is OK but my Fiat Ducato based campervan will not keep plugs in. The answer is a cylindrical metal sleeve adaptor. I have got one of these which came with some device I ...


2

I had the same problem with one of those cheap mp3-FM transmitters. The thing is that some lighter sockets aren't deep enough to accept the adapter, so the wings never go deep enough to click into the recesses of the socket. The best thing to do would be to find an adapter that plugs into the socket and then plug your USB adapter into that. Some hardware ...


2

Rather than connecting it to something in the display, you should run a hot lead down to your fuse panel and tie in there. You'll still need some way to reduce the voltage. Car battery voltage is 12+ vdc. The power which goes out through a USB device is 5vdc. In order to achieve this, you'll need to some how hide the power adapter behind the dash (or up ...


2

It really depends on the battery, not the car. The car will have a very small drain for the radio presets and fob receiver, but not much. A typical Lead-Acid battery has around a 100 minute reserve capacity. Reserve capacity being how long it takes a 25 amp discharge to lower the voltage to unusable levels. That's roughly 41 Ah. Your 6A will lower it too ...


2

I'm concerned about leaving the inverter on when the car is parked and draining the battery. How hard would it be to wire the inverter so that it is only enabled when the engine is running, or at least when the accessories are on? For a 500 W inverter you should use a relay rated at 50A minimum (see resident_heretic's calculations). The schematic should be ...


2

You're over-thinking this. Any reasonable inverter (and even lots of dirt cheap crappy ones you get that plug into the cigarette lighter socket) is going to contain its own over-load protection; most do it in the form of a self-resetting circuit breaker of some sort. The fuse in the fuse box is for protection against shorts in the wiring to the inverter or a ...


2

I would choose the 12V to 230V to 18V pathway. Yep, it has more losses, but that doesn't matter if the speakers are powered only when the engine is on. 18V 2.6A is only 46.8W. Compare this to typical car engine power (100 kW = 100 000 W). 12V to 230V adapter is more versatile than 12V to 18V adapter and likely cheaper as well due to economies of scale. If ...


2

The smell you describe could be a sign of damage, or it could just be your power supply under a heavy load. The damage could be in the charging system, or the car. Your nose is a valuable tool for tracing that smell, as well as a visual inspection: Male charger plug: If you're using a bench power supply you likely hooked up a car charger male plug to it, ...


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