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55

Not at all, in fact there are many occasions when you would want the tires at an angle to the body of the car. Any time you're parked on a hill it is prudent to angle the wheels of the car so that if the parking brake failed to hold the car would run into the curb. If the wheels were aligned with the body when parked on a hill the car would be free to roll ...


30

The reason is that motorcycles traditionally have the fuel tank higher than the carburetor, and the fuel feeds with gravity alone. What risks does this introduce that necessitates a manual shutoff? Without the shutoff, if the carburetor float failed to close the valve tightly enough to stop the fuel flow, then gas would continue to trickle into the carb, ...


26

Perhaps my post is a bit late, but make sure you always face your wheels to an angle if you park your vehicle on a hill. A brake failure can lead into some heavy damage. If you parked your vehicle at an angle, you will get the following: Much better, right? Also, if you drive a car with a clutch, make sure you are in the reverse or the first gear. This ...


25

You've got several things wrong, as you've made a lot of assumptions. First, in an engine if the ignition isn't turned on (ie: if it doesn't have power), you cannot push start it. You can turn that engine all day long and it isn't going to start. Just won't happen. It takes fire to make it run, which in this case is a spark (we're not talking about diesel ...


14

The only time you really need to turn your wheels when parked is when parking on a hill. Uphill you should point your wheels away from the curb. When pointing downhill you should point your wheels towards the curb. This is so if the parking mechanism should fail, the curb will hopefully stop the momentum of the vehicle and keep it from rolling very far. ...


12

Battery operated flashlights or worklights which share batteries with your cordless tools would be a good option. These will allow you to work on the car even with a dead or disconnected battery. Choosing the right tool will give you either an area light or a focused light. Examples from one manufacturer: Other major makers such as DeWalt and Milwaukee ...


11

There are a number of ways to do this, but the two that come immediately to mind are battery-powered LED work lights. (A quick internet search will turn up many). Two varieties might be of use/interest to you. Some can be powered by the vehicle's battery which is convenient unless you're doing something like replacing a flat battery. Others have their ...


10

The primary reason for shutting off the fuel is safety. On a motorcycle the fuel tank is directly above the engine. If fuel were to leak it would drip directly on the hot engine. This along with the fact that most motorcycles use a rubber supply hose that is exposed to the engine heat and the resulting decomposition. On an automobile the fuel is usually ...


9

(I would have added this as a comment but I don't have the reputation yet) As dlu pointed out, on steep hills you want to angle your front wheels towards the kerb, but there are also situations where you want to leave the wheels straight - my brother's car was written off when he left it parked on a very narrow street with the wheels at an angle. A van ...


8

Hi to those starting engines which have been sitting "idle" for more than three months. We recently started a 190e Benz which had not been started for more than 6 months. First step was to check condition and level of all fluids (engine oil, trans fluid, coolant, power steering, brake fluid and battery acid). We then checked drive belts and battery ...


8

The gear ratios in most manual transmissions are such that first gear has a lower ratio than reverse (actually a higher numerical ratio is a better way to express this but I'll follow the convention of this discussion). Often the reverse ratio is about halfway between first and second gear. I guess the reasoning is to allow a bit faster speed when backing up ...


7

Engaging gear increases the effort needed to move the car Typically (assuming a RWD vehicle): In neutral: car moves when wheels, axles, diff(s), propshaft & gearbox output shaft turn In gear: car moves when wheels, axles, diff(s) propshaft, gearbox output shaft, gearbox input shaft, flywheel, clutch plate, pressure plate, crankshaft, valvetrain, ...


6

A "dead" car battery can still have more than enough juice to run things like LED lights, phone chargers, etc. - and lots of us have one kicking round the workshop we haven't got round to disposing of. Sticking one in your boot (sorry, trunk) to take with you is easy enough, and then charge it as far as possible when you get back to civilisation. If you're ...


6

A common way to run cabling from the back of the car to the front is tucking it under the floor carpet near an edge, where passengers' feet don't frequently stomp. For example you could route it along an edge next to the door, then through the B-pillar or A-pillar, around the windshield and to the rear view mirror.


6

My suggestion is always park with the transmission in gear and the park brake on. Along with curbing the wheels. Gear selection (forward or reverse) on flat ground, I choose reverse. My reasoning is that a vehicle parked curbside is more likely to be struck from the rear. Even a nudge from a careless driver can push the vehicle if it is only held by the park ...


6

One thing I found with myself, after learning to drive on farms at a very young age, is that I seem to naturally "know" or "feel" where the outer limits of my car is. It's strange and I can't fully explain it, but I've personally never had this issue. However!! Many people do, you're definitely not alone, and there are a few solutions! One, if it's your ...


6

While the other answer is basically correct, it really doesn't tell you why it does this. These two things are related because of the differential. The differential is made to allow either side to spin at different rates. There are three connections to the differential in a rear wheel drive vehicle: drive shaft (from transmission); left axle shaft; right ...


5

If they say it is unnecessary, I'd put them in the complete idiot category. Will the car run? Most probably, but it has a large propensity to cause issues down the road. With that said, there are some caveats we could talk about. Was the car prepped to stand that long? If the car was filled to the gills with gas, then had 2x Stabil put into the tank ...


5

Once you have driven a few cars for a while you will get used to knowing from walking up to a car and getting in just how big it is. But until that time you can use some useful tricks: parallax: if you really want to get a good idea of distance, move your head from left to right to see how much a point on the object in front moves compared to a reference ...


5

The reasons taught by driving instructors to keep wheels angled to the kerb: one so that if the car rolls on a slope the tyres hit the kerb (as above); to avoid the wear and tear of turning the wheels when stopped (a no no); this is where they end up in a parallel park and makes it easy to leave.


4

Gravel would be better than parking on dirt, mud, straight grass, or anything with a lot of water in it. However its not ideal. The problem is exactly as you state - water rises and slowly damages your price-and-joy. This may not be an issue if you trade up yearly, but personally my two cars are 26 and 42 years old. In order of best to worst Inside a ...


4

Yes, you can put them in the front bumper. You'll need to drill them in - just like the back bumper. I would recommend having a cut off switch for the front sensors somewhere in the cabin, otherwise the beeping would be very annoying. Rear sensors are (usually) powered by the reversing lamp's wiring, so in the front you won't have this... so a cut off ...


4

This is to protect the transmission. I don't know if your vehicle is automatic or reverse, but in either case it is good practice to completely stop the vehicle before going from one direction to the other. By telling you to stop the vehicle for several seconds, it ensures you are completely stopped. Even rolling a little can cause damage as it puts a high ...


4

You may not have a choice. On many "button cars" you cannot just kill the engine while the transmission is still in gear. This is a safety feature to prevent you from bumping it and turning off the engine on the highway by accident. You really don't need to change how you stopped the car from when you had keys, just push the button instead of turning the ...


4

You may not need do it one way or another, but the correct habit would be to stop and then Park the vehicle before turning it off. Why? Well, you're not doing any damage making the selection on the gearbox if the engine is running. You set the vehicle's controls appropraitely and the last thing you do is turn it off. Consider the opposite, do you put the ...


4

It depends on other circumstances. If you are on a slope angled wheels secure your car from rolling down. In the worst case you will damage your tyre agains curbs. In parallel parking, aligning wheels is unnecessary wear of the tyres. But if you are on leveled place with very limitted room aligned wheels allow you to push the car and free some room around ...


4

I live in the Netherlands. Ice on the windows is an issue, but can be mitigated. And we don't have too many days where temperature is below zero. To avoid bird droppings, don't park under a tree. With modern cars, rust isn't an issue, unless you live right by the coast (close enough that the air contains salt spray). Paint fade happens, but only ...


4

The last option is easily solved - straps and / or chains are used to secure the vehicle to the flat bed. In fact these are usually used in all cases as the load has to be properly secured, this is usually a legal requirement and an insurance requirement as well as common sense. As for moving vehicles with “locked” wheels, the industry uses dollies or ...


4

When park is selected it is only the gearbox output shaft that is locked in place, the open differentials that are fitted to the car are still able to do their job and allow relative rotation of the wheels. When the differential input is turned by the gearbox, the differential causes the wheels to rotate in the same direction. However if you rotate a wheel ...


3

As Paulster2 says, as far as your car is concerned, it really doesn't matter, but if your parking brake/gear fails (from being tapped by another car, e.g.) you want the curb, if there is one, to act like a chock block. If there is no curb, then you want your car to roll away from traffic.


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