Hot answers tagged

15

Sport mode will "increase pickup" by providing a more instantaneous response to throttle inputs. As akadian mentioned, the car will stay in lower gears as you accelerate, allowing the engine to stay in the optimal rev-range for higher torque output. The computer, by activating sport mode, will also not have to 'think' about what gear you should be in for ...


8

The oil seen is from the block to cylinder head gasket seam. This is a nearly universal problem on Subaru 4 cylinder engines from the late 1990s well into the 2000's. The average mileage that this is noticed is just under 100k miles. Oil seeps out at first and then the leak slowly worsens. It rarely, but can, develop in to a large leak requiring immediate ...


8

You should leave them just about snug, if not just a little loose. If you tighten them before you put it on the ground, when you do get the car on the ground, there will be tension on the parts, which means it will wear quicker. So, leave them a little loose, then tighten once on the ground ... there's no worries about safety when doing so. It's not like its ...


6

Typically, a spirited driving style involves staying in gears until the higher RPMs to make most out of each gear. This generally provide mode torque and more enjoyment. With this in mind, it's easy to understand that a "Sport Mode" would allow you to use the lower gears for longer as they provide more power, which makes it more "sporty". On the contrary, ...


4

Many times in the past I've used an RTV called Right Stuff. It is very thick and tacky. Degrease everything then apply the RTV to the block surface and a little to the seal all the way around. Pound the seal in to the correct depth. Allow to set overnight. This solution has the lowest risk of screwing anything up. If the repair doesn't hold then the RTV ...


4

At Bob Cross's request, I'll throw an answer out here for you. The information given is with the assumption your engine is an EJ25 series engine, which the 98 Legacy (assumed) Outback had, which is most likely the EJ25D (please correct me if not). While many people call this a "dowel pin", Subaru calls it a straight pin. It should not be threaded (should be ...


4

Lack of system flow or a radiator that cannot transfer heat are the only real options remaining. But since the water pump and thermostat are new and there are no air bubbles in the system the system should be able to flow freely as long a the radiator is not plugged. The most likely cause the overheating is a plugged radiator. A nearly 20 year old radiator ...


4

Pay particular attention to the temperature sensors, the IAT (intake air, likely part of the mass-airflow unit and the ECT (engine coolant temp). A decent code reader will allow you to monitor these and see if they go out of whack. Also, see if the problem occurs when the vehicle changes from "open loop" (cold baseline) and "closed loop" (using feedback ...


4

I don't like those "preprinted" marks anyway. You are much better off following the sprocket alignment pictures below. After the belt is installed and the tensioner properly set, crank the engine over BY HAND (in the running direction) at least four full revolutions, and check that all marks come back to perfect alignment. I've done dozens of these, and ...


3

Until you have ALL the bolts for engine and transmission threaded don't tighten ANY of them.


3

Yes, indeed. In fact not just a Subaru/Outback, if you have purchased a car without CarPlay inbuilt, it can be added to your car afterwards using an after market system which, at the time of writing this answer, is available from the following sellers: Alpine Clarion Kenwood Pioneer Sony Further, separate support for using Siri (only) can be added as well....


3

That green terminal thing looks like a battery terminal designed to provide an easy disconnect : when parking at an airport for a 2 week holiday for example. It needs either removing, cleaning thoroughly and re-fitting or removing and replacing with a quality new one.


3

Going by the sound that you have posted I would think it is the starter gear being slow to retract from the flywheel and the teeth getting hit by the teeth on the flywheel as the engine speeds up and the starter rotation slows down. Solution : remove the starter and make sure all the solenoid / lever / gear mechanism moves freely.


3

Don't let a shop near it just yet! That spot on the ground is not enough trans fluid to stop a Subaru - but it may have been losing fluid over a period of time. I would check the level of transmission fluid - you'll probably find it's empty. Before you fill it up, see if you can find the leak. Subaru's leak transmission fluid from the pan gasket, the ...


3

Are the new tyres of the same load rating (the 95 before the H) as the recommended ones? The primary issue with using a lower than recommended speed rating is legality, particularly relating to insurance. Obviously this will vary according to which country/state/jurisdiction you are in, for example in the UK you must declare this to your insurance company (...


3

The gouge probably came from somebody removing the seal with a screwdriver or pick. Not a big deal and very common. The fact that the seal was leaking does not mean that the gouge is causing it. Those seals expand very well and the OEM Subaru seals are really good. I would lightly (very lightly) sand the gouge with a very fine sandpaper. Then I would ...


2

The OP was fortunate to get away with it here. Note that this isn't guaranteed to work always, especially if the crank and cams are severely out of time on an interference engine. Me: A quarter-turn on the crank is one-eighth on the camshaft. You may be able to get away with it by "rewinding" the work done so far (return the crank back to your best ...


2

Thanks for the audio. By hearing the sound it doesn't seems that there is a problem with the engine. Neither there seems to be problem with the starter mechanism. At temperature below 25-C/77-F the capacity of the battery decreases i.e. the terminal voltage output drops. So as you said that this happens when starting at lower temperatures, it is quite ...


2

The underlying equation that links vehicle speed with wheel revolutions is: Linear Speed = Radius x Angular Speed The speedometer is calibrated against angular speed (e.g. RPM, revs/unit time). So any change in wheel radius will translate to directly proportional change in the reading on the speedometer. A wheel with larger radius will achieve the same ...


2

Replaced Axles. Problem solved.


2

It's possible that the Eyesight system might be out of calibration after the accident. It's under warranty, so I'd take the car to the dealer for a checkup; they're going to know more than a body shop about what might affect your ABS system.


2

At least for the 2005 model the following might be useful: http://www.subaruoutback.org/forums/109-gen-3-2005-2009/411177-new-me-2005-sport-light-cluster.html Once the shifter is in D, you can slide it to the side to engage sport mode. This does two things: increase the sensitivity of the first half of the accelerator pedal and change the shift timing to ...


1

The transmission is out of position - usually when the transmission mount is a little worn. The best solution? once the engine is mated to the transmission, put a block of wood on a solid part of the engine (the crank is good), and use a crowbar to push the engine back while an assistant lowers the engine slowly. Once it's in the slots, use a similar method ...


1

There is a piece often referred to as a dog bone in the engine compartment. It's actually the pitch stop mount, bolted to the firewall and the engine (mount? I don't have the car in front of me right now). Unbolt this from the engine, and the engine will slide right in.


1

What you want to look for is a pulley that is dragging. Take the belt loose and look at your idler, does it spin freely if so it is not that. It could be the water pump or the alternator. Look for loose bearing by seeing if they wiggle side to side.


1

Seems to be the "security system:" https://www.cargurus.com/Cars/Discussion-t17156_ds520375 Turning the key to the ON position in the ignition before reconnecting the ground solved it.


1

My money is on one or more bad engine/transaxle mounts. It would not be the axles if it happens when at a complete stop as they are not moving.


1

Turns out it was the accessory belt. It was a small enough problem that I just ignored it until one day I heard a snap, and no longer had power steering (belt broke). Replaced the belt, tightened it up, and it's been good ever since.


1

If this is above the CV boot on the axle it could be grease being thrown out of a bad boot.i have seen this more than once on the 2005 thru 2009 Subarus.


1

It was indeed a heatshield on the cat.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible