7

I see two possibilities: He just putted some leak-stop additive in the engine oil. That is some additive that is intended to stop an seal leak by miraculously thickening the oil around the seal area and not in the oil channels (where it needs to flow unobstructed). Needless to say that this additives most of the time do an awful job. The crankshaft seal got ...


5

New seals that are too large are unlikey to fit. You need one that has the correct internal diameter. You shouldn't need anything to hold the seal in place. You might benefit from a small wiping of oil to help lubricate it when the new oil cooler is put in place. How much did the seal cost you? Less than $5, I'd say. Just chalk it up to experience, go to ...


4

Axle repair bearings are used when the surface of the axle is chewed up by the old bearing. The repair bearing moves the location of where the bearing rollers ride to a smooth location on the axle. Depending on the vehicle this relocation may not leave enough room for a proper axle seal on the outside of the bearing. In these cases the seal is relocated to ...


4

Since the O-rings in both applications are designed to be compatible with oil, material suitability shouldn't be a concern. As long as the O-rings share the same size and profile, the two should be interchangeable.


4

There are a couple of things going on to make that gasket no longer work. One is that over time the gasket has deformed from its original shape so that it actually matches the void in the metal better. The other change is that the material itself become more brittle and less pliable. The result of these two changes is that the level of pressure that the ...


4

I went to the dealership, with the old gasket I took out of the oil cooler, and they looked it up and gave me the same gasket I bought the first time. I asked one of the mechanics why the new gasket was so clearly larger than the old gasket and he said that it was just shrinkage. So I came home, completely removed the oil cooler from the car, cleaned it, and ...


2

Take a second opinion, as always. To see if it needs replacement; reverse the car 20ft. If there is a pool of oil where the car has been sitting, you should find out where it is coming from and fix it. If not, don't worry. The rear main seal does give way occasionally, but as you say - it's an expensive job if that's the only thing you're doing. $12 for ...


2

I've removed the seals from bearings to lube a bearing instead of replacing it on multiple occasions, but generally out of the vehicle. For that, I'd probably go out and buy a new bearing and take a good seal out of it, replacing the damaged one in the installed bearing (hoping it's a perfect fit). To remove the seals, I will start with very thin edge to ...


1

A different possibility. Your engine had lots of miles on it. Perhaps oil wasn’t changed on a regular basis. There is excessive wear between the crankshaft and the main bearings. That wear allows for slight movement of the crankshaft, causing an oil leak. Its also possible that the outside of the crankshaft is worn at the exact spot the seal engages with. ...


1

Two possibilities come quickly to mind: One: that the seal land on the crankshaft is damaged and it still leaks even with a new seal - will need maching or polishing to correct. Two: that the casting holding the seal is porous and the oil is coming out around the seal - need to replace the casting.


1

The easiest way I've found to deal with this is to pull the old seal out, then completely dry the area of all oil. Put some sealant on the metal part of the seal or around the where the seal mounts. When good and coated (be generous, but don't slop it on), put the seal back into place. Allow the sealant to completely dry. This will take from 8-24 hours ...


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