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6

Personally I'm not seeing an issue with replacing the washer. This is a $.05 part. For my '08 Hyundai Azera, it comes with the filter I get from my Hyundai dealer. Does it really need replaced? Probably not, but the one time when it does need changed and you don't do it may be the difference between a $.05 part and a $2500 overhaul/engine replacement. To me ...


6

If there was no oil leak before the oil change, then there is a possibility of wrong repair done at the workshop. Generally, for changing oil, the oil pan need not be touched at all, except for the oil drain plug. If the vehicle underbody is checked on a two post lift, then the leaking area could be spotted. Taking the vehicle to another mechanic is a good ...


6

Is there any way I can determine if oil foaming happened or is happening e.g. bubbles on dipstick? Yes, small bubbles on the dipstick is a good indication of foaming, there should not be any in normal operation. They will not stay long after engine shut down. Quality oil will have an anti-foaming additive that will cause them to dissipate. In extreme cases ...


5

Judging by your other questions on the site your motorcycle is a '12 Yamaha R6. If so, you have an oil filter, which should pick up the metal flakes and any other debris. A new oil filter and fresh oil should be sufficient to clean out the unwanted debris. It is unlikely that the metal flakes are responsible for a performance degradation if the oil filter ...


5

The oil pan is not a normal wear item, however being so low to the ground it is possible to damage it. As the oil pan is not removed for regular inspection, any decision made by the mechanic should be visible to photograph without tools or disassembly, either as physical damage or oil leaking. Have the mechanic put the vehicle on the lift and show to you ...


5

Assuming you're buying the OEM filter from a Subaru dealer, they should be giving you a new washer with each one. It's an aluminum washer that's sort of folded over on itself so that it crushes. I just did an oil change, so here's a picture of the washers (used on the left, new on the right): Notice that the left one is appreciably flattened. My ...


5

Best guess - NPT threading requires a certain depth to have the sealing effect - so your oil pan would need to be thicker at that spot and probably require more torque. A normal thread won't seal - that's why you use a gasket, but may require less threads to hold so the pan hole can be thinner and you need less torque since you are requiring the gasket to ...


5

It's likely just sealant keeping it together. Some blocks and pans have tabs on the side to allow for a prybar to be inserted without the potential to compromise the seal when it's put back together. A wood or plastic wedge also works well with a mallet and has less of a chance of scoring the sealing edges. I've also used large screwdrivers carefully at the ...


5

The washer is there to prevent oil from leaking. So if you mind having some oil leaking, I'd recommend redoing the job.


4

Was the factory solution not using a gasket? A gasket is usually better than the Room Temperature Vulcanizing (RTV) sealing method since RTV is really messy and hard to clean off during maintenance and is harder to apply which may lead to failure as you have seen. There should be no need to warranty the gasket. If it becomes an issue again it should still ...


4

I've been changing my own oil since 1975 or so, Daniel, more often than not, several cars at a time (it's been a long long time since I've only had one vehicle). I've never changed a drain plug gasket - I've never seen one that leaked significantly enough to warrant replacement. Do wipe around the drain hole, and wipe the existing gasket, before putting the ...


4

Odds are they did a shady job and are now trying to rip you off. No reason why it should be like that unless if they did that by accident or (worse) intentionally. If you can, take a look underneath and see where its leaking from. Likely to be from one of 3 places: 1. The drain plug. Maybe it just needs to be tightened. Or maybe the drain plug has its own ...


4

I agree with @knocksAndMisfires - it sounds strange that the oil pan gasket would have to be touched for a routine oil change. If the oil pan/lower sump was removed then this may necessitate a gasket change since they tend to be a single-use item, but this should not be required for a routine oil change. One other thing worth mentioning: $200 for an oil ...


4

I would check for: cracks, but don't take casting marks for cracks (a picture of your pan would be helpful to tell) scratches stripped plug thread (but then it would already be leaking since you wouldn't be able to tight the plug back ;-)) any deformation especially on the gasket level


4

An oil leak where you see a drip form, but it doesn't drip is not an immediate problem. If this is something you don't want to fix right away, there shouldn't be a huge issue. There are two concerns: Keep a close eye on the oil and ensure it stays topped off. You'll want to check it a little more often than you would under normal circumstances so as to ...


4

I finally dit it. I tried the penetrating fluid but with no avail. I figured I needed more torque, but did not want to damage another ratchet. So I went ahead and welded the broken rachet head and also welded a 2 foot long tube to the end of the old ratchet. With this makeshift breaker bar I managed to apply enough torque to loosen the bold.


4

1. Possibility: Dirko There exists a special product "dirko" from the German company Elring. According to the manufacturer it is able to seal without disassembling. Perhaps not the perfect solution, however I guess it would be worth a try. clean the sealing groove and the surroundings thoroughly with break cleaner apply a thick line over the gasket groove ...


3

As @ Paulster2 has stated you need to determine where the sensor is leaking. I would focus my concerns on the oil pressure sensor very soon. The oil sending unit is under pressure, the oil pan is merely a container for the oil.The oil pump has the capacity to empty all the oil out of the engine in less than a minute at high rpm. If the oil sending unit were ...


3

To have a level difference equivalent to one-third of the difference between min and max is quite large. This tells me that the dipstick is not fully seated in the dipstick channel in one of the orientations. I would consider the orientation in which the dipstick rests lower in the channel (resulting in a higher level reading) to be the correct one to use.


3

This is a pretty common problem. Buy an oversized drain plug tap kit and retap your drain plug threads with the tap. The kit will also usually come with a replacement drain plug that fits the new larger tapped threads.


3

Replacing the washer depends on what the washer material is made out of. Most OEM parts are rubber based, so are both cheap and designed to be one use only. There are also crush washers, which need to be replaced after every use. There are a number of aftermarket (usually magnetic) sump plugs and washers - a large number of these have hard, flat, washers ...


3

Operating temperature of most modern car engines is ~90C (about the same to the thermostat opening temperature) and oil temperature in the sump will be around 10C less than that. More and more modern cars tend to increase engine operating temperature for increased engine efficiency and reduced emissions, hence they increase oil temperature in the sump. So ...


3

I'm not sure if there is some kind of purely mechanical reason (such as, it doesn't seal well enough against oil), but my money would be on cost. It costs money to design and test a new bolt, when the old bolt and gasket combo already works well enough. Additionally, such an NPT bolt would not affect safety, performance, reliability, or emissions. I would ...


3

A new plug and washer, then remove the pan and grind and polish the mating surface flat if a new one is too expensive is a possibility.


2

It very well could be the oil pan gasket, but this could be caused from a leaky anything on the engine. Look for where the highest point of where you see the gunk and start looking from that level. You should also be seeing some amount of gunk on the engine as well. If you really want to find it, do a thorough cleaning of the entire engine bay, then start ...


2

So... I pretty much took in all the advice you guys gave me (and from elsewhere too) and went ahead with the procedure with the oil pan still on the car. One big difference though: Instead of using a tap, I used my oversize plug... I was stubborn and did not want to buy the tap nor take the pan off the car. Here's how I did it: Jack the car up; stands. ...


2

Servicing cars almost every day I would recommend replacing at least the sump plug washer every time you change the oil. I actually replace the sump plug as well where possible so the next person has a fresh head on the bolt to take off. Certain sump plugs have allen key heads which can become problematic over time. The local company I get my parts ...


2

You could use oil flushing agent which is available from most motor factors or, if you cant get any, add a small amount of diesel to the old oil and allow the vehicle to idle for a short period prior to removing the old oil. Also, a large magnet on the sump pan which you then draw to the drain hole should drag out any rogue metal trapped in the system. I'm ...


2

Two things: Ensure you are trying to turn it the right way. (ie: righty tighty [clockwise] lefty loosey [counter-clockwise]) Seeing as how the vehicle is upside down to you (since you are underneath), it's easy to get turned around and applying torque in the wrong direction. Put your combination wrench back on the nut and hit the open end with a hammer (in ...


2

I assume you have tried to spray loads of penetrating fluid on it? Otherwise, from the sound of it, I wouldn't count on getting the bolt out without heat so at this point it would be best to drop the whole oilpan so you can work on it separately. It will be messy and sucks to do but like you said it shouldn't be done with oil in there.


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