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28

... and screw it in by hand, maybe a couple of twists with an oil filter strap wrench. Don't over-tighten it. Tighten it by hand then at most about a quarter turn with a strap wrench or by hand (definitely not a couple twists!) A good indicator is if you can unscrew your new filter by hand with just a minimal amount of initial strength. Go for this when ...


16

In a word: No. To add more to it: Absolutely Not. There is one huge thing which you have not taken into account. That being carbon which deposits from the air/fuel mixture burning process. Where does it go? Right into the oil (among other places). A small amount of blow by occurs which also forces this mixture down into the crank case. Now you have it in ...


15

Oil filter strap wrenches are made to remove filters, not put them on. Oil filters should be made finger-tight, not hand-tight and certainly not wrench-tight. The filter will go through expansion-contraction cycles with the heat from the engine, it will tighten itself up, as you've testified to. If you only make it finger-tight when you install them, you ...


12

No. The point of a magnetic drain plug is to check whether there are pieces of metal floating around your engine. It's not so much to keep these pieces from circulating as it is an indicator of the condition of your engine. By the time you see an amount of metal deposits on the drain plug, you know that your engine is experiencing excessive wear and may ...


12

You need to change the oil filter every oil change. In fact some of the longer lasting oils like Amsoil suggest you change your filter out at normal change intervals if you don't use their filters. The filter is very important in the scheme of things. While the oil may be able to stand up to the longer interval, once the filter gets full enough, it will ...


8

I've had to use slightly smaller oil filter in order to accommodate a larger downpipe on my car. Nothing bad (that can be traced back to that change) has happened as a result since the change (probably 15 years ago now). Oil pressure and volume are still right where they should be, but in theory the change could impact that. You need the appropriate ...


8

Most oil filters have instructions for tightness printed on them, and they normally read like: Tighten by hand until base contact, and then tighten an additional 1/4 turn. I don't recall ever seeing torque mentioned, because the filter housing relies on the rubber o-ring seal rather than mechanical tightness to seal in the oil. Too much torque will ...


7

This is not a serious issue. You can probably even get by using 0W-30, especially since you are in an area which is usually warm. If you were in a colder area up north somewhere, I'd highly suggest you change it out. If you do decide to change it out, don't worry too much about the filter. I'd take the filter down and drain out what's in it, but put some ...


6

Is there any way I can determine if oil foaming happened or is happening e.g. bubbles on dipstick? Yes, small bubbles on the dipstick is a good indication of foaming, there should not be any in normal operation. They will not stay long after engine shut down. Quality oil will have an anti-foaming additive that will cause them to dissipate. In extreme cases ...


6

As long as the specific part is applicated to your vehicle then it is fine. As Brian, mentioned there is a lot more to oil filters than diameter and height. The wrong filter (even if it is the same size) can starve an engine of oil or switch the filter over to bypass mode. Not worth the risk to get a possible marginal better oil life.


6

Here are the instructions per your owners manual. If all else fails, go back to the manual ... you can almost never go wrong by doing so, especially if you still have warranty left on your vehicle. NOTE: I'll throw some descriptive stuff in along the way to clarify things a little. What @rviertel has written is fairly good, but I have some contention with a ...


6

Yes, this is a potential disaster! With sufficient oil pressure, it can blow the extra ring right out resulting in a massive fast oil leak. Trust me, this only has to happen once for you to make sure it never happens again. If you are lucky, as I was, it will happen very quickly (while backing out of garage after oil change) and you only have to deal with ...


5

It must not be the correct size for the filter I'd advise buying something like the CTA-2507. This will grab the sides of the filter and works with a large number of different filters. I use one of these for any aftermarket filter that may not be the same size as the OE sized cups. Alternatively you can use a large pair of channel locks as was suggested.


5

There's nothing wrong with what you're doing, but it's not really needed. There will be enough residual oil at the bearings and wear points to keep everything in check until the oil pressure comes up. The best thing you can do for your engine is before an oil change, warm up your engine for a few minutes or so, then let it set for a few minutes to allow the ...


5

No, but using a quality part for your engine is. Some “cheap” filters may not have the performance or longevity of a quality filter. Really, a “cheap” filter is poor economy considering the function of the filter and the cost of an engine. This applies to fuel filters as well. Use a quality brand - there are several...


4

If when you shift gear and release the clutch you feel the engine reving up without the car actually accelerating, probably the clutch is worn or very old/used. (this goes for manual gearbox)


4

Your logic is way off. You should change your oil and filter at the manufacturers recommended intervals, with an oil of the manufacturers specification. The manufacturers cover many many miles under many differant conditions to decide a specification and in most circumstances the specification cannot be bettered for the intended use of the vehicle.


4

The number of times the oil and filter are changed in the process of cleaning out an engine is not a fixed number. We keep changing it until it stays clean. Two changes is a common average. The change interval also matters; we use an interval of 200 miles. There are too many variables to establish a set cleaning routine. The amount and type of internal ...


4

Fits on every known oil filter. Cheap and simple. And never slips. As harder it is tensioned, as harder it will grip it.


4

Found it... The small O-Ring goes where the oil filter bolt meets the oil-filter tray.


4

Re-using the filter as you describe should not be an issue. Clean the rubber o-ring off (paper towel or clean shop rag should do the trick without injuring it), then reapply clean oil to it and it should seal again. There is one caveat ... if it's the oil filter itself which is leaking, all bets are off. If you're going to pull the oil filter off, ensure the ...


4

Replacing the filter without draining the oil is almost guaranteed to be very, very messy no matter where the filter's placed. You can re-use the oil as it's fresh, just drain it into a clean container, replace the filter and pour it back in.


4

It kind of depends if the 300 miles was 3 hundred-mile trips, or 150 two-mile trips. Moisture will condense into the oil, and if the trip is short enough, there won't be enough time at operating temperature to boil off the water. This is BAD for the engine, as parts will rust and things will clog. Water will displace the oil on bearing surfaces, and water ...


3

It's very difficult if not impossible to compare how oil discolors in two different engines. First, both engines would have to have the same oil in it. That way the chemical composition of the oils is the same, they have same type and amount of detergents and friction modifiers. Second, the engines would have to be driven in exactly the same fashion. ...


3

An oil filter can be classified as good or best by the amount of contaminents it can filter before needing a replacement. Good oil filters often have a high degree of filtration capabilities compared to normal ones but the price difference you pay is usually not worth it. According to this thread there are some key factors at work here that need to be ...


3

An FYI it is a very bad idea to use automobile oil in your motorcycle. The reason behind this is because auto oil often has additives in it that when used in a motorcycle with a wet clutch (which most do) will wreak havoc on your clutch. Given that, auto oil filters may be comprised of more fibers/elements that can perhaps cause higher/lower oil pressures ...


3

Are there differences in oil filters? Absolutely. You need to understand what the function of the oil filter is. Oil carries contaminants away from the bearing surfaces in the engine and pump it through the filter to remove them. An oil filter is filled with some sort of filtration media. It is arranged in pleats to give it more filtration area. Generally ...


3

I'm not a fan of running 15k miles between changes myself (while the oil may be stable that long, you're also circulating all the contaminants that your oil picks up much longer), but if you choose to do so, I'd use the matching oil filter. If M1 Extended Performance oil is what you choose, use the M1 Extended Performance oil filter that goes along with it. ...


3

I run into this a lot its a combination of the o-ring and the filter cap bing plastic/rounding off. If you have someone lightly pry against the cap and tap it with a hammer and chisel it usually breaks free. You should always replace the o ring and apply some clean oil to it when changing the filter


3

If there's enough room around the filter and it's a cartridge type, you can actually stab it all the way through with a screwdriver or punch and use that as a lever to turn it. If you don't want to do that, try to grab onto it with channel locks or vise grips. Remember that you're throwing the filter away so it doesn't matter if it's squished. If it's an ...


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