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8

No, you are best off with blank rotors(no slots, no holes) just like stock. Slotted rotors are more aggressive on the pads. Drilled rotors are plain dangerous unless they are a good quality(read expensive) that were cast with holes in place not drilled after the casting. generally, cheap drilled rotors are for looks only. They are also less efficient in ...


5

One notable option for an integrated dash cam is the new C7 Corvette. As a dealer installed option, you can get a complete Performance Data Recorder (PDR) that includes a dash cam: The PDR records GPS data, car performance information such as G-Force and steering angle and overlays everything on the through-the-windsheild POV video to give you something ...


4

Anything that has the manufacturer's logo on it will command a premium. Brakes are brakes. As long as they are made to fit your vehicle you will be fine. I've been running 3rd-party brake pads and rotors forever. They stop the car. Keep this in mind: "You get what you pay for" is what they are counting on you to remember while shopping.


3

I don't know why it wouldn't be safe. Each performs the exact same function: to prevent leakage between the outer soft part and the inner hard part (whatever might leak through) ... (yah, that's a lot of words to just say "form a seal"). The main reason the OEM clips are used is they are cheaper to produce en mass. Even if you save $.02 per clamp by using ...


3

I haven't worked in or managed a shop, but I have been told in the past that work would not be warranted if I wanted to use my own parts, or if I wanted the shop to try and get cheaper parts. Extrapolating from that... For the shop to trust the work they do, they have to put their trust in all of their suppliers. There are many many after-market companies ...


2

I'd always thought there was some directive that stated this but apparently it's an urban myth, which makes sense because how would you ever enforce it were a manufacturer to pull out of a market such as Lancia in the early nineties or collapse like Saab did in early 2012. There is some rumour of some EU based directive that suggests parts supply for ten ...


2

Many if not most OEM brake pads will also contain any original pad shims or anti squeal plates. While your old ones may be reusable many times they are not. It has been my experience that some vehicles (Honda in particular) have fewer squealing issues with the OEM pads. Even when purchasing aftermarket pads the more expensive pad sets will contain shims or ...


1

The greatest resource I've found for what you are talking about is a website called RockAuto.com (NOTE: I have no affiliation with or interest in the website or the company listed.) Yes, they sell parts, but they have a lot more information than that available on their website. Here's what I do ... I go to their website and look up the vehicle in ...


1

The parts manufacturer, in the example Hella, will produce a range of parts which goes into a range of cars. When the cars are new, the manufacturer of the parts will have agreements in place to supply certain products to certain vehicle manufacturers. For example, the original Volkswagen timing belt on my Mk6 Golf was marked up with Continental logos and ...


1

Meh. I don't agree. Often, the "aftermarket" axles are reman from OEM cores, so there should not be dramatic differences in the product. The biggest failure is the boot, which allows the balls and tulips to shed lubricant, gather grit, and become sloppy/clunky. The amount of tooling and effort required to rebuild these in-house leads me to buy quality ...


1

My evidence is likely anecdotal at best, however.. For the longest time I went with aftermarket OE-equivalent parts because I'm cheap. After buying a high strung performance car (and having a wholesale hookup at the dealership), I moved over to proper OEM parts. The difference is astounding. Gaskets have generally been paper from Felpro, Beck/Arnley, etc....


1

The two are functionally equivalent. Just be cognizant of the possibility of physical interference with other components when you use the generic clip in lieu of the OEM one.


1

They'll likely be fine, however just double check that everything is sealing properly, as quite often many of those OEM bands are slightly narrower compared to jubilee clips, and so they sit in the carbs insulator sleeves perfectly thus creating a proper seal.


1

OEM parts have the reputation to be the most suited parts for the vehicle. There are important scenarios where somebody wants to use the most reputable parts instead of alternatives. Think In-house maintenance for fleet vehicles: There is not only the maintenance work but some also needs to comply with the (often informal) company culture. Should there be ...


1

Integrating a dash cam into your car is doable. I used to have a GPS antenna at the top of my windscreen, wedged between the roof lining and the mirror mount. The wire ran along the edge of the roof lining, inside the A-pillar trim and through the dashboard to a power supply I'd placed in the center console behind the stereo. You could attach the camera to ...


1

Drilled and slotted rotors are used for racing cars or road cars driven very aggressively and perform well in rainy climates.There are many benefits of drilled and slotted rotors and they are a bit more expensive.


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