47

I wouldn't touch the odometer. The rule I always subscribe to is that the odometer measures how far the chassis has rolled. Otherwise a person could go mad trying to figure out which repairs/replacements should reset the clock. (Obviously not tires or wheels, but wheel bearings? Axles/driveshaft? Transmission/differential? etc...) It also makes sense when ...


25

I've never replaced an odometer when replacing an engine. What I will do, however, is make a note in the cars documentation that the engine was replaced at xxx,000 miles with a new/refurbished engine with xx,000 miles. I also keep all the receipts of any ancillary parts replaced at the same time (tensioners, water pumps, etc), so that a new buyer can see ...


14

You're probably better off not replacing the odometer. You will need to keep accurate track of how far the car has been driven in total, so if you were to later sell your car without disclosing that the actual mileage is the new odometer reading + 220k miles, you could be found guilty of fraud. You certainly don't have to replace the odometer, and it will ...


12

The story is indeed plausible, and a quick google search indicates instrument clusters failures are not uncommon for that vehicle. As with any used car, I would have your mechanic inspect the car, though since it is a relatively small difference between claimed and displayed mileage, there really isn't a good way to disprove the sellers story. If the ...


11

The problem is, you have to take the seller at his word, and that's just not the way business transactions work. He has an obvious incentive to sell the car with a lower mileage, and regardless of what a good guy he is, can't be trusted. If you really like the car, and can't find something comparable from another seller, you might continue to press your ...


11

Saturn had a recall on this problem on L-Series vehicles. You may be having a similar problem on the S Series although I cannot find any information on it for your vehicle. Below is the recall info on the L-Series. 2000 - 2002 Saturn L-Series Vehicles (All Models) # 02-C-02 - (Aug 16, 2004) INACCURATE ODOMETER READING AFTER LOSS OF BATTERY POWER (...


10

If your speedometer is accurate, you can check that with your GPS or phone as well. The only real option is the cluster (The thing with all the gauges and odometer). You can send it off to have it repaired, or get a used one from a junk yard. If you ever sell the car you are legally bound in most (if not all) US states to tell the buyer of an odometer ...


7

In the UK, you can use the registration number of a vehicle along with the manufacturer and obtain a complete MOT history which includes mileage readings. If you have something similar where you are, try doing this. You would be looking for consistent mileage increases which approach but do not exceed 80k miles. Then you would observe a jump. Possibly ...


6

Here is how this could have happened on the 2002 BMW I used to own. I know the guts of that car particularly well, I am sure the Saturn is similar. The mileage is actually stored in two places in the car. One place is the instrument cluster and the second is in the DME (the "computer"), both of those will count up the miles independently. If the cluster ...


6

More than likely the bulbs have gone out (died) which services the needles which has gone dark. To replace these you'll need to dismantle the dash, which really isn't too hard (procedure found in this video). When you get the speedo cluster out, find the white plastic backing and remove it. Underneath of it, you should find the bulbs which need to be ...


5

this is a possibility I have not dealt with your bike in particular but on various CBR versions if the rectifier is bad and dumping a little AC current into the system then you can have the dash do a lot of crazy things. If you want to test the stator, here's a link. It's for a Suzuki but the 5 wires for the rectifier work the same as your bike. 1999 ...


4

While your speedometer sounds particularly inaccurate, the simple fact is that almost all car manufacturers design their speedometers to be inaccurate because of speed legislation in many countries: From thecarexpert.co.uk, EU law says that A speedo must never show less than the actual speed, and must never show more than 110% of actual speed + 6.25mph. ...


4

You shouldn't have any worry about it, necessarily. Keep the documentation as you suggested and pass it along to a new owner if that ever occurs. If you drive it until the tires fall off, this will never be a worry. You aren't trying to get over on someone and you didn't cause the discrepancy yourself. It is what it is and should be treated as such. If you ...


4

It appears to me you bought a car which had the mileage rolled back on it. The only way I'd consider myself wrong in this is if you bought it new. When an odometer has been tampered with, sometimes they stay where they are supposed to and other times it can revert. This really depends on the vehicle and the device used to monkey with the odometer. The ...


4

I don't know about Volvos, but speaking as a former Saab Automobile engineer I'd say there's a good chance the correct odometer reading is stored elsewhere in the car (in another ECU). A Volvo technician should be able to figure it out. Also, it's VERY hard to "fix" the odometer. Close to impossible, in fact. You'd most likely have to buy a new one (which is ...


3

The odometer on that car is mechanical, and is in the center of the speedometer. In this image, it reads 1.4 miles.


3

In many states upon transfer the title is supposed to record the fact that the odometer doesn't show actual mileage. You can expect this will adversely impact the value of the car in the future, regardless of how believable you find the seller's explanation. Essentially, whatever he saved with a used instrument cluster is now offset by the impairment that ...


3

That is the part of the odometer called the Trip Odometer. There should be a button you can push to cycle through the different settings very near the reading, usually in the dash. You can usually press and hold the button to allow for a reset. Since it shows an [A] on it, you can expect there is probably a second one named [B] (at a minimum). If you cycle ...


3

I'll go with a combination of the standard overstating of mileage on the car (well put by Rory) and also GPS inaccuracy... I've been doing Road Rally for a long time and a big part of that is precision mileage measurement. As an instrument rated pilot, I also have a strong interest in GPS navigation. One of the things I learned when experimenting with ...


2

Its almost Impossible to determine the mileage of a pre digital era vehicle. There is No way you can ascertain that the odo has not been tampered with, for instance the local mechanics in our suburbs have dedicated machines that will tamper with your odo for a given price, for example to go back 15,000 miles you have to pay around $100(converting , I am not ...


2

Cause Your car (like most cars) saves the milage in a small memory chip inside the instrument cluster. That chip is called an EEPROM. Like most memory units EEPROMs are subject to wear. If you rewrite the data often enough the chip will fail to save the new data or save corrupted data. This could be the case here. So, why is the "correct" (i.e. new) value ...


2

Millage correction is possible on ALL vehicles and it does have its legal uses. Peugeot/Citroen suffer from a bug where the BSI gets corrupt and the millage changes to a random value, Landrover 2005/07 to around 2014 also had a issue where if a instrument cluster was incorrectly programmed it would put 99999 miles on the clock. Then there is obviously the ...


1

According to this link from the Texas Dept of Motor Vehicles, the Exempt reference means: The vehicle falls within criteria that allow it to change ownership without disclosure of the odometer reading.


1

It's perfectly normal for a speedometer to show a different reading to a GPS. It's also perfectly normal for the accuracy of a speedometer to vary more than the accuracy of a GPS varies. GPS aren't 100% accurate either but it would be fair to say they're potentially more accurate than a speedo, but probably less so than a calibrated speedo (fitted to certain ...


1

I'm not sure if your Corolla is this way, but if the car uses the wheel sensor(s) to calculate the speed of the vehicle and a sensor is bad, not only would the ABS light be on (because of the bad sensor), but the bad sensor would also prevent the speedometer and the odometer from working. You need to utilize a code reader (one which can read ABS systems) ...


1

Not sure about your model car, but on older cars this would almost certainly be a burned-out fuse. Ask around and/or do some online research for fuses in your car, or just take it to a local auto parts store and ask them if they will look at it. It would take less than five minutes to find out. If it's not that, then you need to go to the dealer.


1

It sounds to me as though your car was imported from a country which uses KM. It may be that it's had it's instrument binnacle replaced at some point in the past with an import unit. Typically it's fairly easy to convert a KM speedo to MPH by simply removing the perspex and needle and sticking a replacement facia marked up with MPH over the speedo. It's ...


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