A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.

New answers tagged

4

A modern car (say, post-1995) will run on lower octane gasoline with reduced performance (power, economy) and no other issues. Older cars did a lot of nasty things ranging from occasional "pinging" or "ringing" noise and accellerated engine wear to complete engine failure. Then again, one cannot easily find these days neither a pre-1995 car nor a gasoline ...


9

Presumably since you say "92 octane gas" you are not in Europe. The whole topic is a mess, because there are different scales for measuring "octane". The most common scale world-wide is RON, but there is a different scale known as MON which produces lower numbers, and in some countries (particularly the USA, Canada, and Brazil) the numbers on the pump are ...


24

It's not a problem mixing them. Just start using 95 if that is what the engine calls for. You'll not create any issues doing so. Modern day engines have sensors which can adjust for the fuel. If yours calls for 95, but you're running 92, the engine most likely won't be putting out the power it would on the 95. You probably won't notice a difference in ...


0

Follow the owner's manual directions. Honestly.


0

Octane needed by any petrol engine is basically determined by compression ratio and combustion chamber design (Ricardo circa 1920). Google the subject to find a table of compression ratios/octane needed. Computerised engine management, by optimising ignition timing and air/fuel (mixture) ratio has made economic the use of lower octane fuel in engines that ...


Top 50 recent answers are included