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5

As Brian alluded to in his comment, in most cases it will not work. You have to have a reader which will read OBD-I. Some readers, like the Innova 3140 will read both, and comes with all of the adapters to attach to the "older" vehicles. Brian also stated about the change to OBD-II. In the US it was mandated to change over in '96. Some manufactures changed ...


3

I think it's a very laudable enterprise. I also think your "fish" isn't gonna last long. Your best bet is to convert to an aftermarket injection and ignition system (Haltech comes to mind; but there are many others.) OBD II is all about emissions compliance. If you really want to explore the extremes, it's gonna be about your tune. You need to gather ...


2

The connectors you're looking for should be under the dash on the driver's side of the car. This is the area you've opened up already. I don't think the lone green connector you can see in the "B" picture is one you're looking for. I think you'll have to dig around a bit more to find what you're looking for. The connectors look like this in shape: Here is ...


2

As explained in other answers, the short of it is, no it is not easily feasible. For your purpose, a tunable after-market ECU would be necessary. You may be interested in an open-source ECU, that you can build yourself, provided you have some electronics and programming knowledge. It's been ported to 40 different vehicles so far, and you can add yours to the ...


1

It's very hard to tell if the sensor figures are correct. O2 sensors become 'lazy' over time, with slower responses to changes in oxygen levels, this could explain the lagginess of the readings. O2 sensors can also become less accurate with age, and high CO is one possible result of that. So the sensors could be reading correctly part of the time, or they ...


1

Usually on OBD 1 cars you can jump a pin and read the codes via a blinking light of some sort, refer to your van manual to find what pins to jump(with a paper clip) and then depending on the blinks the manual should have code read outs from that


1

In short the answer is no. You best bet will be to get an aftermarket computer fuel injection system and put on the vehicle. If you can be more specific about what you want to tune exactly I may be able to give you an easier alternative.


1

The atmospheric pressure sensor is located in the ECU per Mitchell. This is fairly common across makes. Try clearing the codes and if the code comes back replace the ECU.


1

In picture A, the Yellow connector is the SubaruSelect Monitor 1 connector - unless you're at a dealership, you won't have that tool, so you can ignore this connector. In picture B, the green connector is the D-Check (Dealer check) connector. There should be a mating connector (also green) very close to it. If you connect them together, you'll get a lot of ...


1

I have an Actron CP9145 that reads obd 1.5 on my 1995 GMC Jimmy. does not read ABS or Airbag though. Bought it new for $135 a couple of years ago. Don't remember if I got it on Ebay or Amazon. I know this is an old thread but I hope this helps someone.


1

I have a 95 Chev Astro 4.3 Vortec V6 with the transitionary OBD1.5 connector and I use a Craftsman Scantool CanOBD2&1 Kit, part number 920899 (about $300+ US back around the turn of the century [2000]), to read the codes and reset faults. It works. It has always worked. I bought it to talk to my '86 and '88 OBDI TransAM WS6 GTAs which it does quite well. ...


1

When the Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) has been reported on, do the following: Connect the SCS Service Connector to Service Check Connector as shown. (The 2P Service Check Connector is located under the dash on the passenger side of the car.) Turn the Ignition Switch on. Note the Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC): The MIL indicates a code by the length and ...


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