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17

The tool Thanks to you all for your many good suggestions, but I thought I'd share how I actually got these nuts off today. First, more PB Blaster, and then while I was at the auto parts store getting parts for another project, I spotted these and decided to try them: On the package they say "Reusable" but on the store's web site they say "...


10

A lot of localised heat to the nut will help. A 1/2 inch spanner/wrench is slightly smaller than a 13mm, so that may still work after heating. If you can’t get a splitter on it, you could drill a line of holes into one side of the nut and chisel it off. The holes may also release some of the tension and allow it to turn. I have used an air chisel on the ...


8

As you don't care about saving the nut you have a few options. In addition to the good solutions mentioned in other answers I have a few suggestions: One of the handiest tools out there is locking pliers, i.e. vise-grips. I've gotten many a frozen, mis-shaped nut off with these puppies, and it's the first thing I'd try Cut it with a dremel. Because of the ...


7

As you've noted, you can't get a socket over the nut, which eliminates a large number of tools with sharp internals that resemble a socket. Not many options remain, but one of them is a nut splitter. Summit Racing Equipment sells a nut splitter with an open arc. Many other nut splitters are enclosed circles, also resembling a socket, but the open arc allows ...


5

I needed to remove a nut on my son's exhaust where the nut/stud were so corroded and rusted there was no way to get them off. For one of them, I used a cut off wheel, which worked out pretty well, but the second one was in a place which was inaccessible to a 4.5" disk. I first grabbed my hammer and chisel, which didn't do much mainly because of the ...


5

As an experienced motor vehicle welder, I can assure you that any rusted nut and bolt, no matter how corroded, is easily removed by heating the nut with an oxy-acetyline torch until it's glowing red. This anneals the steel, making the thread slip easily. Another option is to weld a bar to the nut. You will find that heat can be applied to the nut without ...


4

After seeing your solution to your problem, and that you really just needed a 6 point hex rather than a 12 point. I think you would be far better investing in a hex ratchet spanner/wrench like this one from a set I have - I bought them individually and you could probably buy one for less than the price of those adaptors and they will last a lot longer. ...


1

Actually, see if you can tighten it ever so slightly first, then hit it with the penetrant/rust agent. Let it sit for the couple of hours, then hit it with some type of thicker lubricating oil. When that's on there, then squeak it back and forth to work in the oil a little bit. You should be able to work it out that way. Heat isn't going to work very well ...


1

To your second question, Generally, caged nuts would be used during assembly when the location of the Nut is difficult to work with, and especially if the 2 parts prefer to not stay together, which would lead to nuts being dropped. By attaching these first 2 in cages attached to the part, working the Bolt from the other would be much easier until some ...


1

Another way to get something red-hot is an induction heater, the popular brands are Bolt Buster and Mini-Ductor, and there are eBay etc. knock-offs as well. It's on my list for a few reasons: precise heat delivery, handy if there are rubber or other sensitive bits close by quick one of my cars has a slight fuel leak, should be less explode-y Side note: ...


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