Hot answers tagged

18

As you have reasonable access to the nut, I'd suggest using a nut splitter to split the nut and open it out, which should then allow you to withdraw the bolt and remove the parts - obviously both nut and bolt will need to be replaced, but you'd already worked that out!


17

The tool Thanks to you all for your many good suggestions, but I thought I'd share how I actually got these nuts off today. First, more PB Blaster, and then while I was at the auto parts store getting parts for another project, I spotted these and decided to try them: On the package they say "Reusable" but on the store's web site they say "...


13

I'll make a couple of cogent points, but I doubt I'll be able to organize this coherently. Go get and read Carrol Smith's Nuts Bolts Fasteners and Plumbing. This is religious tome-level knowledge that will transcend all time. Although mostly about racing and motorsports, the concepts still work and apply to all fastener connections. Carrol will be quick ...


11

A tap/die is not the same thing as a thread chaser - while it can be used that way, you have a higher risk of cutting new threads instead of renewing old threads. A proper thread chaser will clean up old threads with a much lower risk of cross threading. They can save threads that appear destroyed and are well worth the expense. Here is a Craftsman set ...


10

A lot of localised heat to the nut will help. A 1/2 inch spanner/wrench is slightly smaller than a 13mm, so that may still work after heating. If you can’t get a splitter on it, you could drill a line of holes into one side of the nut and chisel it off. The holes may also release some of the tension and allow it to turn. I have used an air chisel on the ...


8

As you don't care about saving the nut you have a few options. In addition to the good solutions mentioned in other answers I have a few suggestions: One of the handiest tools out there is locking pliers, i.e. vise-grips. I've gotten many a frozen, mis-shaped nut off with these puppies, and it's the first thing I'd try Cut it with a dremel. Because of the ...


7

Have you tried completely drenching them in PB Blaster or a similar penetrating oil? I've seen it work wonders in the past for me. I'd cover them in a layer of that, and let it sit for several hours. Odds are, it'll dissolve enough rust that you'll be able to work a bolt into it.


7

Based on the pictures, I don't see any options besides cutting the bolt in half. A grinder wheel would make light work of cutting the bolt, but you may have to resort to a more primitive approach, i.e. a hacksaw.


7

As you've noted, you can't get a socket over the nut, which eliminates a large number of tools with sharp internals that resemble a socket. Not many options remain, but one of them is a nut splitter. Summit Racing Equipment sells a nut splitter with an open arc. Many other nut splitters are enclosed circles, also resembling a socket, but the open arc allows ...


6

They look exactly the same. The threading is probably the same on both nuts. Use a hammer and flat head chisel to peen the new nut. These nuts aren't meant to be reused and as long as you're hammering into the groove it's fine


5

I needed to remove a nut on my son's exhaust where the nut/stud were so corroded and rusted there was no way to get them off. For one of them, I used a cut off wheel, which worked out pretty well, but the second one was in a place which was inaccessible to a 4.5" disk. I first grabbed my hammer and chisel, which didn't do much mainly because of the ...


5

Couldnt you drill the head off to be able to get some stuff out of the way, cut the bolt further down, drill a center hole with a small bit and proceed drilling away the remaining stub?... You have to grab the bolt from behind so it wont keep turning but it might work. (hard to say from the pictures but I have the impression that once cut down the bolt ...


5

I was in a similar situation (car, not a bike) once and I didn't know about nut splitters (see Nick C answer) at that time. I was able to get at the nut with a Dremel and a very small (1" diameter) cutting disk with a flexible extension between the Dremel and the disk. With the disk I was able to slice diagonally across the nut (couldn't get the angle to ...


5

I just stumbled across this entry in my factory manual, which says that overtightening is the correct procedure. The safe margin is given by rotation rather than torque, however -- up to 60˚ past the point where the specified torque is reached.


5

Save for the trouble of going to the store this is a pretty easy fix. Take one of your bolts and go to a hardware or auto parts store and ask for a tap to match. Then run the tap through the holes. The tap should go pretty easily. If not double check that it's the right size and then work by turning it in a turn it so and then backing out just a bit.


5

As an experienced motor vehicle welder, I can assure you that any rusted nut and bolt, no matter how corroded, is easily removed by heating the nut with an oxy-acetyline torch until it's glowing red. This anneals the steel, making the thread slip easily. Another option is to weld a bar to the nut. You will find that heat can be applied to the nut without ...


4

Given the good vertical access to the bolt, I'd cut it off with a sawzall using a fine hacksaw blade.


4

After seeing your solution to your problem, and that you really just needed a 6 point hex rather than a 12 point. I think you would be far better investing in a hex ratchet spanner/wrench like this one from a set I have - I bought them individually and you could probably buy one for less than the price of those adaptors and they will last a lot longer. ...


4

Those are captive nuts, if they are not rusted then the shroud stops them turning. If they are rusted or seized then the nuts can rotate in the shroud and you will need to hold them with pliers or mole-grips. Just undo the bolts ftom the other side.


3

Torque to specifications then further tighten to align nearest slot in nut to hole, never back nut off to align hole.


3

Well, if its a car suspension, im sure there is a toque spec. But in general tighten so cutter pin will be in the middle. But if its something like a wheel bearing you have to make sure the wheel can spin and not bind up due to over tightening.


3

There are two reasons why they may be "always replace" items: To (try to) ensure that there is good thread locker on the nuts, perhaps because thread locking compound doesn't work reliably on nyloc nuts - I could see it being difficult to reliably clean the threads, or perhaps the threads are slightly looser than they "should be" for use without the nylon ...


2

I highly recommend that you find yourself a shop manual for the bike. These are available in hard copy version, and sometimes in PDF format as well. It will make it clear how to perform various operations, and make it less likely that you will do it wrong. I highly recommend that you do not mess with any of the gears. Transmissions run at very tight ...


2

There is usually a generic specification depending on diameter and material. Genuine service manuals will have half page or so on common bolt and screw sizes but you may have to hunt for it as it could be in specifications, servicing or somewhere else Grade 4 bolts will snap way below the minimum torque for grade 8 of same diameter Metric use slightly ...


2

You need a clutch basket removal tool This tool will allow the inner and outer clutch basket to become locked together in order for you to remove the bolt that is affixed to your transmission primary shaft. This is a relatively cheap tool. I recommend you use an air impact to remove the bolt. Upon tightening you will want to use a torque wrench and lock ...


2

If the bolt is turning inside of the nut, that would indicate to me the threads are stripped either on the bolt or the nut (duh, right?). If you can get a third hand to help you, you'll need it for what I have proposed. If you can place a flat tip screwdriver on the tip of the bolt and pry it back towards the nut, then hold the nut with your wrench (spanner),...


2

I would drill a 2mm hole each side and then split it open with a chisel - should either split or use a large screwdriver to turn it. I would also make a template to hold the drill steady so as not to add to the damage.


1

As already mentioned above it is best to use a torque wrench because overtightening a fastener can cause to stretch when it gets hot and break.The only way to be sure is to use the recommended torque found in the repair-manual for the specific model.


1

You will not be able to use that nut. The pitch is wrong. You'd be in essence trying to force a coarse threaded nut (1.75mm pitch) onto a fine threaded bolt (1.5mm pitch). You will destroy both in the process. Either wait until you get the one you ordered or find one with the correct pitch.


1

You can get tools just for this job - Do a search for "locking wheel nut removal tool" For example this one from Laser Tools - https://www.lasertools.co.uk/product/6972


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