8

There are several possibilities: The bike's battery is bad. This is by far the least likely cause, as the previous battery behaved exactly the same way. The chances of having two batteries fail sequentially in the same manner is very low. The battery is not being charged when the motor's running. If there's something awry with the charging circuit or its ...


8

On GMs now adays the Engine Control Module controls the starter relay. It will look for a park/neutral signal from the range switch and a crank signal from the ignition switch/Body Control Module. A break down of the starter relay terminals. If you pull the relay you'll see it's labeled on the bottom and has a diagram on the side. 85 - ECM sends power to ...


6

Take a look at the wiring on the starter the S terminal wire may have come off. Pull the starter relay. Terminal 30 is fused battery power. Terminal 87 is output to the starter S terminal. Terminal 85 is power from the ignition switch in the start position. Terminal 86 is PCM controlled ground with the neutral switch in between. If you don't have power at ...


6

Looking at the video, it appears to be an electrical problem. It looks like the main power leads are losing their continuity when you turn the key to activate the starter. This issue could be ANYWHERE along the main lines of your power cables. Mainly four points to look at: (+) connection at battery and at starter; (-) connection at the battery and grounding ...


4

By using an non-programmed key to start the vehicle, it has triggered the anti-theft system. According to the Owner's Manual; To disarm the system: Press the UNLOCK button on the keyless entry transmitter. Also, using a valid sentry key and moving the ignition switch to the ON/START position will disarm the system. If none of this works, you will ...


3

Sounds like a position switch is failing due to oxidation on the contacts. Typically there is a park or neutral position switch at the shifter and possibly one at the transmission. In a manual transmission, which does not have park, they may be called a neutral safety switch. Next time you have this problem, instead of letting the car roll, I would move the ...


3

Most ignition switches consist of two components: a rotary switch, and a lock cylinder (the part you removed the wafers from) that serves as the "knob" that turns the switch – but only if you have the right key. Broadly speaking there seem to be three possibilities here: After removing the wafers the key is free to turn, but the motion is not transferred ...


3

Two key observations (no pun intended): jumping the solenoid starts the engine dashboard lights stay on even with the key out This tells me that the ignition circuitry is not following the key position in the ignition barrel. This could be due to a bad ignition switch or break in the associated wiring.


3

When you put the key into the ON (not start) position, do you hear the fuel pump? Have someone stand at the back of the car, or better yet with their head under the rear bumper, turn the key to ON and listen for the pump. You should hear a whirring noise. Your vehicle doesn't seem old enough, but the ethanol was killing the fuel pumps of a lot of late 90's ...


3

I would replace the ground to the battery , they are known for corroding internally , it will cause same issues but will not do it all the time, that's where I would start , good luck hope this helps


3

For me the first step would be to connect a booster cable between the engine and the battery earth terminal - to test if any of the grounding cables / straps have failed. You should then do the same for the supply cable to the starter... Only then could you consider the starter at fault.


2

Your Tundra should have a Starter Relay, and it's likely in the main fuse block under the hood. I checked your Owners Manual but it doesn't look like they put the information in there. Fuse Locations are likely molded on the underside of the Main Fuse Block Cover. As @SolarMike said, you should remove, clean, and tighten grounds and battery terminals. ...


2

Thinking more, you turn the key, massive voltage drop as the starter tries, 1) bad earth to the engine: connect the battery's black wire to a good metal part of the engine, as it is trying to earth through your wiring system. 2)try if you can to turn the engine backward or forwards by hand with a spanner on the bottom pulley, the starter motor could be ...


2

Clean all of the battery connections and ensure they are tight. This includes the batter and terminal connectors, wire ends at the solenoid, wires to the starter, and wherever else you can find they run. If it connects somehow to the battery, clean and tighten. Also check to ensure there are no bulges in the battery cables. This indicates corrosion, which ...


2

Don't think we can get a good diagnosis based on this info unfortunately, just due to the number of things that could cause an issue like this. So I'll start with the basics. Do you have fuel? (check gas tank rather than relying on fuel gauge in-case its broken) Check the fuses box in the car, are there any broken fuses. Since you have no dash lights/...


2

It sounds a lot like your ESM is bad (electric shifter module) or EGS (transmissiom control module). When you move the shifter does the PRNDL on intrument cluster display properly? It will not crank unless it knows it is in P or N. The EGS around this year have a bad problem of transmission fluid wicking up the wiring and filling the module with fluid. If ...


2

This answer assumes there's a fault in the electrical system somewhere. With the bike off, remove the cable from one terminal of your battery and put a multimeter (IN CURRENT MODE!) in series with the battery terminal and cable. You should see zero amps flowing through the meter. If there is current flow, even in the milliamps range, you've got some kind ...


2

My bet is, your battery is too dead to run the engine, which could be caused from a bad alternator. You can check the voltage at the battery using a digital multimeter (DMM). It should be around 12.5vdc or better. If it is less than this, try charging it and seeing if that allows you to start and run the engine. If it doesn't take a charge, then you'll need ...


1

Check the starter motor is it well attached to the bell housing i once experienced the same problem but on a Mercedes Benz and later found out i had loose starter bolts. If it bolted nice and tight then the problem might be within the starter motor maybe a faulty starter solenoid . Then check all the wiring harness


1

Your immobilizer is active. After flashing the replacement ECU with proper VIN and calibrations you need to also program the immobilizer to store the sync codes in the replacement ECU. It needs to be done while connected with your immobilizer module and key so can not be done remotely like your supplier did for flashing the VIN and calibrations. Turn your ...


1

If it's the battery that came with the car from the factory, five years is beyond the expected end of life period. Have the battery health checked at your local auto parts store (Autozone, etc.).


1

Measure voltage drop when key is cranked at battery Compare battery voltage at starter wire (not signal wire) when cranked Anything less than 9.5-10v is a dead battery Also comparing voltage at battery and starter lead post will tell you if voltage drop is caused by corroded/loose cable-also check earth connection to starter


1

This sounds like a dead or dying battery - jump start or replace battery, but if you jump start it won't start the next time.. And then have the charging system checked just in case. Edit: so if jumping and it still does not start then it could be the starter or the cable feeding the starter. One way to check is to put the jump lead directly on the ...


1

Even if the motor turns, that does not mean it hasn't seized as it could have been a soft seize, in which the rings do damage to the cylinder walls without getting stuck. There are three parts needed for combustion in an engine: fuel, spark, and compression. Fuel and spark aren't likely to have changed from overheating, but compression definitely could. Do ...


1

Well guess what, I ended up paying 200$ for an auto place to ridicule me. As I stated in the OP, I had changed the huge ground on the passenger side motor mounting bracket, but I put a subwoofer ground cable: 6mm enveloppe, 4mm wire diameter, which is wayyy too thin! Therefore, not enough amperage was passing through. I feel like an idiot now. Never replace ...


1

First test is the battery voltage. A simple multi-meter that you can get almost anywhere for less than $20.00 is sufficient. You should be somewhere close to 12.6 volts. If so, then the battery isn't the issue. If it's low, then yes try the parasitic draw test next then. The next step would be to clean the battery terminals and all battery connections....


1

I've seen this problem before on an older Golf where there was a hairline crack in the fuse board and going over bumps or turning left caused the electrical power to disappear causing the car to temporarily stop. My first suggestion would be to check all of the wiring to the battery terminals paying particular attention to the fused wiring that sits above ...


1

A seized engine is when the oil has become thin due to excessive heat or lack of oil resulting in metal upon metal contact. This can cause items such as the piston rings, bearings, or rods, basically everything the oil touches to experience increased wear to the point the engine "locks up" or seizes. A compression tool can be had easily enough. It may be ...


1

See if the battery disconnect switch needs resetting. Look on top of the + terminal of the battery. If it has red showing in the window then press the yellow button to reset. WIS: "The battery disconnector cuts off voltage from components of the front engine harness, i.e. generator, starter motor and the front relay and fuse box relay, in the event of a ...


1

After diagnosis it looks like the ignition switch, when it does the no crank I can hold the key in the start position and wobble the key-lock cylinder around and it will crank, its like it does not quite engage the switch when the interior temps get to a certain point, strange issue I have never run into before but think I found the problem or least narrowed ...


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