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21

If there was ever that much water in the muffler such that it was sloshing around, it would be a sign of catastrophic failure in the engine, such as a blown head gasket and the "water" would actually be antifreeze/water mix from the engine. However, my understanding of your question is that you're interested in the normal case of a few drops of water ...


8

You will likely be annoyingly loud but otherwise fine. As always, you are liable for your own compliance with local noise ordinances. I would recommend that you drive with the windows up until you give the car to the shop in order to avoid any risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. For example, don't drive with the trunk propped open: the low pressure behind ...


6

If you don't want to weld, you can use a joint like this: NOTE: The above image is for demonstration purposes only. I couldn't readily find one which was 2" on each side. The only difference is, the inside diameter on both ends would be 2". Your outside diameter 2" pipes would fit inside. Use two muffler clamps to attach. You'll need to match the outside ...


4

Exhausts can be difficult to remove. In many cases constant heating/cooling has burned off any coatings and the bare metal has corroded or rusted the nuts and studs together. If the exhaust has cylinder head studs with exposed nuts you can try several things. Start by soaking them with a penetrant oil. Only do this when the exhaust is cool enough to touch....


4

It's possible to cause valve damage if the engine is hot and cold air is sucked up into the exhaust (by backpressure when the throttle is closed). However, you'd have to basically disconnect the exhaust right after the exhaust header, or have a cracked exhaust header, for that to happen. So it's extremely unlikely you caused any engine damage. A more real ...


4

What you are looking for can be found by googling "exhuast repair kit." It's essentially a sleeve with 2 clamps that you fit over or under (depending on the design) your affected exhaust section. Assuming there is nothing left on the muffler side, you'll only be using the 1 clamp. "Exhaust repair sealant," is the goo you are looking for to seal the whole ...


3

Wow, a lot of technical discussion here - maybe it would be quicker to physically look at the mufflers on a few vehicles. On the bottom, and usually towards the rear of the vehicle the muffler will usually have a small pinhole to allow condensed liquids to escape.


3

While I can't provide the technical details as to why, I would say your weedeater is performing as expected. With full choke and full throttle, you are flooding it when the muffler is attached. I would expect that you would smell or even see fuel coming out of the exhaust. However, with the muffler removed, the backpressure is so low that the engine can blow ...


3

You have a few possibilities Get used off Ebay. I always see those stock pipes on there. You can drill a hole through the side of your current junk pipe and rivet the baffle in place as long or short term temporary solution. You will need to get a rivet gun and rivets to get this done. You can repack your baffles, as you suggested, and then use the rivet ...


3

I agree, it is likely a hole in your exhaust. I have a 99 A4 and get an exhaust leak about once a year by the flex pipe near the front. If a CEL didn't come on, I couldn't imagine something mechanically wrong that would cause it. Easy way to check is to jack the car up or put it on a lift while running and see if you feel air being blown somewhere along ...


2

Probably a cracked/rusted out weld somewhere. Could be a hole that finally rusted through. Sometimes the bolted together joints rust through. Typically results in a cat-back exhaust replacement. Can end up being full system replacement. Rarely can be fixed in just one location.


2

The auto parts store can probably rent you a pipe expander. Once you get the pipes apart you can use the pipe expander to change the diameter of the pipes. Be sure not to rip one from expanding it too much!


2

To fix two parts of an exhaust together you use sealant or paste to help seal the gaps which are present on almost all joints. Then you fit a clamp to compress the joint and lock it together. Paste alone will not hold an exhaust together.


2

The material is the fiberglass baffling material from inside the muffler. It is an early indicator that the muffler is failing. The interior metal frame work is rusting away allowing the packing to escape.


1

It depends on what is near the hole; that is, what the exhaust blowing toward. Gas tank and lines, brake lines and electric wire would be especially vulnerable to damage. A header pipe ( manifold to first converter/muffler, etc.) is hotter than an intermediate pipe. While on vacation I got a hole in a header pipe ; I made a crude temporary patch to drive for ...


1

A fairly common cause of "rust" on stainless is contamination with carbon steel ; such as a steel brush used the prepare or clean the stainless weld, also cleaning the stainless with steel/cast iron shot as a Wheelabrator. And normal high temperature oxides on the stainless from production or welding ; with time these usually black oxides become brownish as ...


1

Depends on what you mean by "muffler". If you mean the last part of the exhaust, behind the transmission and everything than it's probably just a coincidence. But, if it happened to fall off and take the oxygen sensor, or the path upstream of the oxygen sensor with it you will have problems. It could also have leaked hot exhaust gases on the transmission, ...


1

Per Flowmaster’s own fitment checker (on the link you provided) it doesn’t list your car... so, no it doesn’t fit. If the question is “can I make it fit?” Then yes - of course you can! BUT if you fit a muffler that isn’t designed for your vehicle, you could adversely affect the performance of the motor, so I don’t recommend that. Unless you understand all ...


1

There are two potential causes. 1: sensors in the engine and exhaust may be detecting anomalies, and telling the engine to shut down in order to prevent potential damage. Those sensors don't know that the muffler fell off, they just know that something isn't right 2: the engine was designed so that there is some back pressure from the exhaust system (the ...


1

In addition to what others have mentioned, depending on your area, you may be violating noise and emission laws. You may get a ticket.


1

It's not a big deal. The worst it's going to do is dirty things up near where the exhaust is coming. Just make sure it's not near the fuel or brake lines, because of the heat. Definitely get it fixed, after your trip.


1

The job of the muffler is to reduce the noise level of the exhaust; no other damage should have occurred if the exhaust piping was disconnected there.


1

You can also keep the headers and add universal slip on mufflers.


1

This is a very subjective question in what do you mean by noticeable? It also depends on the size of the resonator itself. The general answer would be, no, it won't. Most mufflers have fiberglass matting in them which absorbs the sound which flows into the muffler. The dents usually won't affect this. The only time it would is if the muffler is completely ...


1

Your specific link says Inlet: 2" (which is one dimension you look for) and it includes Universal Fitting kit (50cm Flexi pipe, Reducer, Clamp and Strap). This means you probably wouldn't need to weld anything. It also says it fits your car. General Advice Look for inlet diameter, outlet diameter, dimensions of muffler, and position of inlet and outlet ...


1

What I did was I cleaned out the muffler with brake cleaner then blew it out with my air compressor (didn't really do much, I didn't see much carbon buildup come out). I put the muffler back on, dumped out the E10 gas that I had in the tank, replaced it with 100% gas, and now it works. Not sure which of these steps ultimately fixed it.


1

I don't think you need to worry about the fuel tank, though use good judgement here: if the trunk feels hotter than the sun, I wouldn't risk driving around. I think my main concern would be exhaust gases getting into the cabin and making you too whoozy to drive safely. Open windows and a short drive should alleviate this though.


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