Hot answers tagged

31

According to wikpedia, the volumetric constant of thermal expansion for gasoline is av=950*10^-6/K For example, if the temperature changes by 20K (20°C; 36°F), the volume changes by a factor of 950*10^-6/K * 20K = 0.0192 The warmer fuel has a volume increased by about 2%, and since energy content depends on the mass, the energy per volume decreases by ...


17

tl dr: No. Over the lifespan of your vehicle, 230 miles is absolutely nothing (especially on Hondas, lol). At most, this starts to get you to the break in point of the engine. You'll still need to keep the regular maintenance on the car at the given points, but overall it really means nothing. As far as warranty goes, it doesn't start until the car is ...


11

When shopping for tires, some of them will have a mileage warranty, normally in the range of 40,000-70,000 miles. When a mileage number is listed, it is a pro-rated tread life warranty. When the tires are kept properly inflated, and rotated on a strict, verifiable schedule, they should give you the listed number of miles before the tread reaches the ...


7

Many countries (but notably not US) actually have regulations regarding temperature compensation of fuel volume. For example, UK has Standard temperature accounting for fuel dispensers, which allows the volumetric measurements to be corrected for the standard temperature of 15°C. Needless to say, it makes no difference when to tank in this case, as you ...


6

I wouldn't worry about it - "new" cars quite often accumulate a few miles pre-delivery. Usually this is the vehicle being moved between lots (as the dealer said) and various movements around storage facilities. A friend of mine has worked for some time at the main Jaguar Landrover factory here in the UK and from what he has described cars get moved around ...


6

Maintenance records are key. Look for a large book of receipts, going back as far as possible. Make sure you know what the main maintenance issues are on the car; e.g for Subaru, they need a timing belt service at 105,000miles (in the US); if the car is around that mileage, and there's no record of it being done, then walk away or negotiate a $1,500 ...


5

I would assume it's a calculated estimate, based on an "average" wear rate for the compound used - I'd expect that they would run the tyre in controlled conditions for a certain mileage, measure the wear, and extrapolate out to give a full wear life. As with all these things, the controlled conditions of the test means it's unlikely that many people would ...


5

I would bet the engine in your car is drive-by-wire, which means the computer is controlling the throttle, not you. In doing so, it is going to look at the load put on the engine and a bunch of other factors and give it only the throttle it can use as well as the gas ... at least in high gear. By going WOT in this instance, you'll not be causing your engine ...


5

Searching the number under the image leads me to believe this is "Royalty-free stock photo ID: 1465044698 Novosibirsk, Russia – July 09, 2019: Citroen C4, close-up of the dashboard, speedometer and tachometer with orange backlight. modern car interior" Took a look through a manual on manualslib but didn't see anything conclusive. To be honest given that a ...


4

As @sweber said, the tanks are usually underground, which keeps their temperature constant. However, if you are filling a smaller bottle with gasoline (ex: for a small engine), the first few gallons (litres) that come out of the nozzle will be a slightly different temperature. This is because the pumps are above ground, and if they are sitting in the sun, ...


4

Here are some generic tips for increasing mileage: clean filters: air and fuel filters become restrictive when they get dirty. Clean them or replace them, depending on your engine's design. clean fluids: a happy engine is an efficient engine. Frequent oil changes help. spark plugs: inspect them and replace them when necessary. They set your fuel on fire, ...


4

One cause can be head gasket failure as you say, but another cause is continuous short trips where the engine does not get properly hot - the 8 mile city trips can be an example of the type of use to cause condensation in the engine leading to the mayonnaise you have found. Solution give it a good run where the engine has to work hard and get properly hot - ...


4

Note that whatever hydrogen you produce will contain energy from the car battery. The car battery is charged by the alternator, which gives you energy obtained from fuel. What you describe aims to be a perpetual motion machine but isn't. The inefficiency of the electrolysis (less than 100%) and the inefficiency of the alternator mean your overall scheme ...


3

My answer is - yes, gas engines are affected in the same ways by hills and wind... but that doesn't mean surface streets are the better option. When you look at the question as a raw physics question you find the answer that all resistive forces do not discriminate between drive type. Doesn't matter if you all electric, hybrid, gasoline, diesel, car, truck ,...


3

It depends whether the EGR valve is stuck open or shut. Stuck open would cause drivability issues and decrease MPG. Stuck shut would cause no adverse affected apart from the check engine light (in some vehicles it may go into limp mode). The reason is that a engine to run most efficient it needs cold, clean and dry air; the EGR valve lets the hot, dirty, ...


3

It sounds like it isn't being driven enough and there is condensation in the crankcase that isn't being burned off. You should probably follow the recommendations for harsh driving conditions


3

Well its not a bad thing getting a pre-owned vehicle but some factors are to be kept in mind before spending your cash for the same. Kilometers or miles it ran Parts to be renewed or parts to be reworked upon without replacing -Check the fuel tank for damage. -Check the engine belt. -Check the gear box etc. Total budget structure for maintenance If ...


3

There's probably something somebody can do to restore the glass on a windshield to pristine condition, but the cost would be close to a new windshield, if not more. For example, when I bought my first car, I was nuts about having rock ships filled. At $10 a pop, I thought it was reasonable. I filled maybe 10 or 12 stone chips over the course of 2 or 3 years, ...


3

tl dr: Move along; nothing to see here. 396,000km (246k miles) is a lot of use even for LSx engines. Unless you are getting this for free, I'd pass. There are several reasons for this. Even though this is a 5.3L engine, it isn't the same as what comes out of the trucks. It's nomenclatured as an LS4 engine. According to this Wikipedia Article, the ...


3

It is absolutely plausible the mileage would roll back (or, would that be forward?). I've seen news casts of "investigative journalism" where the journalists have looked into whether the odometers can even be rolled back. There are tools out there which can do exactly that. As with any tools, there are some which are better than others. Inside car ...


3

The basic answer is, you need to gap it to spec. The reasoning here is the ignition system is designed to run at the spec'd gap. Running it narrower will cause it to get poorer fuel burn and thus poorer power and fuel mileage. If wider, it becomes harder on the ignition system. Considering most, if not all of the ignition parts, are as old as the car itself, ...


2

Its almost Impossible to determine the mileage of a pre digital era vehicle. There is No way you can ascertain that the odo has not been tampered with, for instance the local mechanics in our suburbs have dedicated machines that will tamper with your odo for a given price, for example to go back 15,000 miles you have to pay around $100(converting , I am not ...


2

The way to calculate the gallons per mile is as follows: Fill your tank to full and note the mileage Drive till the tank is down to about 1/3 Keep the driving to the kind you would normally do, or you will effect the results. Go back and fill the car up to full again, and note the mileage and how many gallons were put into the tank. To make your final ...


2

Well, since you already paid for the thing and there's not typically a huge window of time to return it, the answer to your stated question, according to the Serenity Prayer, is to accept with serenity the things you cannot change. What you may also be asking however, is "is there a legitimate reason to have so many miles on a car that hasn't been owned ...


2

The testing for tires has components in them which I find nefarious and not realistic. I've never had a 60,000 mile tire last the anticipated distances. My driving 'style' is most probably the delta between the testing regiment and what I actually get out of a 60,000 mile tire.


2

There is no great answer to this question. This is because you're wondering about the short-term and this is more of a long-term type answer. Even the long-term type answer depends on the area you live in. For cold or humid environments highway is better. During the minimum 40 minute drive, the car can achieve the full operating temperature for some time. ...


2

Multiple tests have shown that fuel octane level has no role in mileage and maintenance. Octane level only says something about detonation resistance, the caloric value (amount of energy) in the fuel does not increase with a higher octane level. It could however infuence the amount of power that an engine can produce. If you have a high-performance engine ...


2

Here's an article explaining a basic generic Drive Cycle Since you'll want to be as efficient as possible, you should follow the procedure provided by the Manufacturer. That procedure is listed below. Mazda Drive Cycle Pre-requisites: MIL off and no DTCs present (this is where clearing your codes comes in); fuel level between 15 and 85%; all accessories ...


2

small engines don't need the extra octane and the extra octane won't produce any higher efficiency. However, non-ethanol gas doesn't attract water link ethanol gas, so it doesn't corrode the inside of the carb. That's why it's preferred. But you still need to add fuel stabilizer if you're going to keep it in the tank more than a month.


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