Hot answers tagged

10

Allowing for the answer that the screw threads into sheet metal, a helicoil will not provide sufficient grip as suggested in Plan B above. One option that is likely to work reasonably well is to use a product called a rivnut. It is similar to a pop-rivet in that it is installed from only one side and also distorts upon installation. One would exercise ...


8

If you have a welder. Weld a metal rod to the top of the drill bit at a 90 degree angle from the drill bit. You can then use the rod as a lever to turn out the drill bit in reverse. You may want to take a hammer and punch and hammer on the end of the drill bit a few times to loosen it. How much of that drill bit sticking out? IMO opinion, even if it a ...


8

The drill bit has flutes (grooves in the sides). Try driving nails into both flutes, then grab with locking pliers and turn. Lubricate with penetrating oil first to help. On second thought- instead of nails, which are generally very soft steel, use tougher steel pins... the easiest of which to find is the shank of a dull drill bit, everyone has some dull 1/...


8

If building for a street vehicle, according to this forum post, they say that for 2x3, 2x4, and 2x5, 0.120" wall rectangular tubing is more than adequate for car frames. If you have to go a bit thicker to find what you want, even better. If you are building for competition use, you'll have to look up what their regulations state. Every sanctioning body will ...


7

An English wheel is a tool for bending flat metal sheets into curved surfaces. (Thanks to @vini-i for a much better, succinct summary!) As for what you can do with one, it's probably about the same as what I can do with one which is "not much" at the moment. :) But here's a video of an expert. Note that this guy makes it look easy, but it's actually ...


6

seat rail of my car I'm just going to stop you right there and hopefully help you understand that this is a critical safety fastener, and you should not consider this lightly. During a vehicle crash your seat must stay fastened to this location for the entirely of the crash for the rest of the vehicle's safety systems to have their full intended effect. ...


4

Plan A Disassemble nearby parts, remove them (including carpet, cabling etc) Cut out the part containing the damaged hole Read about stick, TIG and MIG welding Go on a welding course Buy large amounts of welding equipment Upgrade the power supply to your garage Weld in new steel Grind welds flat Drill a new hole at correct location Tap hole for correct ...


4

Cars and vans tend to have holes left in the body after the production process, and these are usually filled in with rubber grommits. It could be that your van is missing one of these, or as Mark mentioned in the comment on your question, it could be missing something like a screw (or something used to be screwed in there). As there is rust, your best bet ...


3

What you were breathing in was a mixture of rust and dust that had accumulated on your panels. These particles can cause irritation in your nasal passages short term, longer term buildup can cause lung problems. They can also cause eye irritation. A one-off isn't likely to hurt you, the cilia in your lungs will remove the dust, but a particle mask and eye ...


3

For go the previous answers! I used to do it all the time as a Big truck Mechanic. use two lite hammers and two punches half the diameter of the drill flutes(grooves on side of the "drill bit"). Ask a friend to operate one set of hammer and punch you the other set. using the drill flutes You both set punch at opposite directions,close to 90degree angle to ...


2

If the bit isn't well jammed into the hole you might be able to get the tips of some needle nose pliers down the flutes and grab hold of it with that. If you can get hold of it, unscrew it out of the hole. This has worked for me but the bit in question wasn't tight in the hole.


2

Ideally, with a heavy duty screw/bolt extractor. If that does not work, here is a helpful walk through I recently came across about how to remove a broken but from an engine block: http://m.lowes.com/pd/SpeedOut-4-Piece-Screw-Extractor-Set/50217437 http://thegarage.jalopnik.com/heres-how-to-remove-a-broken-bolt-without-losing-your-m-1702042621


2

It's hard to say exactly from your picture as it's a bit out of focus for that area, so this will a bit more general than I prefer. Adhesives are not a substitute for material strength. If a piece of plastic/wood/breaks because of some sort of force that's routinely active on it then adhesives are rarely as strong as the material itself. If the material ...


2

"brown or dark colored spot" that could be a spot-weld... in which case epoxy won't do it as you may need electrical contact... Better pictures of the detail may help, but if it is a spot-weld then most good body shops will have a spot welder & machine who can do that for you. If you know what you are doing then you could make one, but I don't want to ...


1

Just remove the crud, dust, dirt and grease then fit it. The stainless will be fine. Trying to get it to a poloished mirror type finish is not worth the effort, especially as it is an exhaust heat shield. Do make sure it does not have any stress cracks in or around the fixing points.


1

Personally I would make a collar ie a piece of tube with a slit and slide it over the damage, then probably braze around the top, bottom and the join... I would braze as the parent metal seems thin with lots of surface corrosion "dimples", so the collar should add some strength. If your welding is really good then you can weld it - but given the hole you ...


1

There are two routes I'm aware of you could take. First, you could weld the hole shut. You'd need to clean the area of rust/corrosion with a sander, then get a small circular punch out of the same size (diameter/thickness) of metal as the hole, hold it in place, tack weld it, then finish weld it, then paint match it to keep rust at bay. (General description ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible