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If your brake pedal went to the floor it means that there was not enough hydraulic pressure to apply the brake. If they were working fine before and never felt squishy then your master cylinder has probably gone out and needs to be replaced. Alternatively you may have a lot of air in the lines, enough that the pressure applied by the brake was not enough to ...


4

With that much line replaced, it's going to take some effort to bleed. Somebody has to sit and pump the brake, while somebody else works each bleeder nipple starting at the furthest from the MC (probably right rear) to the nearest. Another option is to slightly crack all nipples on all calipers (rear cylinders probably on a 98 Jimmy) and just let them ...


4

After examining your added photos, here is how I would do it: Remove the entire assembly, and clamp it well in a vice. Obtain the proper drill size for the tap you will need, from a really rough guess that looks like M6x1.0 -- but you'll need to measure the bolt (use the clean one) to be sure. Slowly and carefully drill out the stripped hole, using ...


3

Just thought I'd quickly update you on the situation. Put it simply, it's now fixed. It was indeed the ABS pump, and bought a used one on ebay for 55 dollars and I replaced it at home on my driveway. I've heard I needed to get it re programmed, but, I've drove around for a few days now and it's like new so I'm not going to bother with that. No issues at all. ...


3

1972 Flat Rate data is a bit difficult to come by, even from a fossil like myself that never throws anything away. For a 1982 Mustang 5.0 V8, book is around 2 hours labor. The engine compartment is less crowded on a 1972, and might be a tad easier.


3

A thread repair kit: helicoil, timesert, quicksert would be the correct way to repair it. Since this is a pretty low torque application, it's possible to repair with the epoxy like JB Weld or quicksteel, filling and then drilling and tapping the hole. Another repair might be to drill and tap it to a slightly larger size in a different thread system, ...


3

What the ?? For a repair like that something is definitely wrong. What exactly is causing the off kilter position? For the brake system to operate correctly the "linkage" driving the master cylinder plunger must be aligned perfectly. Smooth operation no hang ups any where. The reservoir must ALWAYS provide fluid to the inlet during normal vehicle ...


2

To check the brake fluid in your master cylinder, follow these steps: 1. Open the brake fluid reservoir on top of your master cylinder of your car: If you have the kind with a little plastic bottle on top, just unscrew the cap on the little plastic bottle that sits on top of the master cylinder of car. If you have a metal reservoir, use a screwdriver to pry ...


2

By what you describe its highly unlikely that the clutch is at fault here.. To me too it sounds like either the clutch master cylinder is sticking or the clutch pedal mechanism is at fault.. Or perhaps the clutch hydraulic system just needs bleeding. A repair to anything mentioned shouldn't be too expensive. The component you linked to could possibly also ...


2

The cause of a soft brake lever is one or more of (a) air in the brake lines, (b) tired brake lines that expand as brake fluid pressure increases when the brake lever is pulled, (c) failing master cylinder, (d) failing wheel cylinder(s), and/or (e) a physical leak in the brake system that yields a puddle on the garage floor and may allow entry of air, ...


2

If you have fluid in the brake reservoir, and have no pedal, you have a failed master cylinder. The piston that moves when you step on the brake pedal has o-ring seals that if they fail, can allow fluid to pass by them and not apply pressure to the brakes. All brake systems today have a dual circuit system where if you loss pressure to a wheel (caliper, ...


2

Because there are no external leaks and the brake pedal now doesn't go to the floor but (sometimes) is soft, either a) air is still trapped in the brake system, or b) one or more of the car's flexible brake lines has fractured internally, thus temporarily allowing brake fluid to fill the space between the line's two layers. Read the answer posted here.


2

You posted two links to images of master cylinders and then asked, This cylinder has some sort of rubber seals, whilst this one doesn't look to have them or they're a different color and hard to see. Both cylinders have the same OEM number. Actual question: Are these rubber seals swappable or can the mechanic just use some regular rubber shaped to fill ...


1

According to Pascal's law, pressure must everywhere be equal. Pressure is defined as a force on a surface. Pressure equals force devided by area P = F / a. That is, the area of the master and slave cylinders (those inside the calipers or brake drums). So, brake pressure is only affected by the area of the master- and slave cylinders and the force that's ...


1

You'll need to remove the booster from the fire wall of the vehicle, then drain it out, then use some acetone to clean it out. Let it dry, then re-install. If it continues to work correctly, you're in business. If not, you'll need to buy a new one or at the very least, one from a wrecking yard as a replacement. Unfortunately, you probably won't know if it's ...


1

$150 really isn't that much. Yes, seals can be replaced. Most brake master cylinders can be overhauled, depending on the model kits are often available with replacement seals, springs and the like. There may be sites and videos with step by step instructions as well, again depending on the model. The seals and replacement parts in the kit will be specific ...


1

reaction disk..... this took way to long to figure out


1

It's boiling.. time to change your brake fluid! Brake systems aren't completely sealed - and brake fluid is hygroscopic so over time moisture works it's way into the fluid (either through flexing on the brake lines or through the breather on the reservoir) and as the moisture level in the fluid increases the boiling point drops. Boiling brake fluid is a ...


1

you have lost fluid any number of ways such as 1) if the pads become worn, there is more space for fluid inside the caliper, and this can cause it 2) The master cylinder could be leaking or the fluid can evaporate in desert climates 3) the system is so worn it is damaged and leaking onto the ground or the car 4) There could be air in the system from an ...


1

There is a gasket that sits between the master cylinder and the brake booster. It is a thick rubber gasket that fills the space between the two parts and fits snugly around the master cylinder shaft. part #- 46185-SE0-003


1

As another user mentioned, you will need to be absolutely sure that fluid isnt leaking from any other location at all. If the hose burst caused the current cylinder to empty out, you will want to try a bench bleed, also as suggested, followed by rechecking all of the calipers for air. To check for fluid in the booster, you could try a wire hanger, or perhaps ...


1

Well, I haven't been able to find anything good. Then best advice I can give is these 2 options: Find what is "factory stock" for the '66 C10, and work your way backward from there. That's not a very viable method I think because the best you're gonna get is a group of possible vehicles. Take it to a brake specialist and see if they can tell you. They ...


1

The mentioned symptoms (no pressure on the clutch pedal) normally would indicate air in the circuit, so I would then recommend a flush. In your case the description of an oil drop on the cylinder seal leaves no other explanation than a leaky master cylinder. Since the amount of fluid in the cylinders is so small even the slightest leak in the cylinders ...


1

Theoretically what your proposing will work with two caveats. The size of the compensation port. When the master cylinder is "off" there is a port that allows brake fluid to circulate from the system to the reservoir. This port is usually pretty small and trying to push enough fluid though it for the rear calipers may be problematic. Calipers require a ...


1

I am not familiar with the setup of your mustang, but I am going to assume it is similar to other booster/master setups I've seen. Here are the approximate steps you would follow. Disconnect battery. Disconnect pedal from master/booster. Disconnect vacuum line from booster. Disconnect brake lines from master. Disconnect booster from firewall. Install is ...


1

What is described here is classic excessive water in the brake fluid. The previous application of the brakes prior to failure heated the calipers enough to boil the moisture in the brake fluid and fill the calipers with water vapour (steam), forcing the brake fluid back in to the reservoir. On the next application, the pedal forces fluid into the calipers ...


1

You need to bleed the brakes, you will have an air pocket in the system. As you stand on the pedal, the system is compressing the air pocket instead of the fluid, hence the brakes won't actuate. Here's a popular mechanics article on how you can do this yourself, or you can take it to a mechanic and they can do it pretty quickly and cheaply for you. This ...


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