25

You've got several things wrong, as you've made a lot of assumptions. First, in an engine if the ignition isn't turned on (ie: if it doesn't have power), you cannot push start it. You can turn that engine all day long and it isn't going to start. Just won't happen. It takes fire to make it run, which in this case is a spark (we're not talking about diesel ...


16

The parking brake should hold the vehicle, otherwise it can be difficult to achieve a hill start. When parking, the front wheels should be turned into the kerb so if it rolls it runs into the kerb and stops.


12

It isn't normal that the car moves downhill with the parking brake applied, if it does it shows that the parking brake isn't working properly. It should fully stop the car even when on a steep hill. This can be caused by worn brake shoes, the cable could be stretched out or the mechanisms are worn, all are (generally) straightforward to fix. It's a safety ...


8

The gear ratios in most manual transmissions are such that first gear has a lower ratio than reverse (actually a higher numerical ratio is a better way to express this but I'll follow the convention of this discussion). Often the reverse ratio is about halfway between first and second gear. I guess the reasoning is to allow a bit faster speed when backing up ...


5

Don't try greasing anything inside the bell housing. Grease will get thrown onto the friction plate and cause you problems. If the pressure plate is faulty or a previous owner had a heavier plate fitted then the only cure is to change the plate for a "normal" one.


4

David's comment is correct. It's either the linkage, a damaged or bent shift fork, or something wrong with a synchronizer or internal transmission component. Try shifting into 5th with the engine off, vehicle not moving, and the clutched pressed in. If you still can't get into 5th easily, it's most likely mechanical linkage or a shift fork. If you can ...


4

I don't think you'll have much luck trying to use other cars' brake systems. Here's what a parking brake system generally consists of: Handle A splitter to split the one handle into two cables The cables that attach to the splitter, and run all the way back to the rear wheels (separately). A drum brake system inside each rear rotor (connects to the wires,...


3

It depends when you do it and how quickly you do it. If your engine was under a lot of load at the time, then the load would be briefly passed onto the synchronising clutches which could cause wear. If the engine was not under load and you did it quickly, then it wouldn't be much different to doing the shift with the clutch pedal pressed.


3

TL;DR: As Rory said in the comments, it doesn't sound too out of the ordinary. In addition to that, I will say that spinning your clutch this gradiently will wear it out faster because of the amount of time the plates are rubbing against each other. It's ideal to traverse from bite point to full engagement as quickly as you can while maintaining smooth ...


3

Your vehicle may be equipped with a "hill-holder" feature which will hold brake pressure when on an incline, even with your foot off the brake. It's a Subaru trademark for many years. If the situation you describe is not happening on a sloped surface, the sensors involved in actuating the hill-holder may be failing/failed.


3

Assuming that the clutch is fully releasing when you press the clutch pedal, the roughness you feel moving into first or second gear indicates the synchromesh for those gears has worn. Shifting requires that adjacent gears in the gearbox mesh together; this meshing is challenging because the gears rotate at different speeds. Synchromesh is a mechanical ...


3

The way I was taught in driving school is this: Pull the handbrake (this is obvious) Put the car into gear (1st or reverse are recommended) in case the handbrake fails. The gear does not matter that much though and any would work in the end, because compression is what keeps the car from moving. When the wheels start rolling, the gearbox transfers that ...


2

The metal in your oil is not there because you didn't use a flush agent, it's there because your transmission is making metal. The question is whether it's just normal wear or whether you've got gears stripping. The lab message was: Action: Drain oil from unit if not already done and evaluate wear metal debris. This is good advice which you should follow:...


2

The reasoning behind leaving in gear is that first and reverse gear are both low ratio gears, this provides enough resistance against the car moving should the brakes fail. If you consider how engine braking works to slow a vehicle and how quickly, you will see that using low ratio gears is also an effective brake method to prevent movement from standstill.


2

With skill and lots of practice you can change gear without the clutch at all. Move to neutral as you come off the accelerator (reducing the load on the gear teeth), match the engine speed for the next gear and slide it in. Warning, you need a good "feel" otherwise earplugs as the sound of grating teeth... Which means you don't have to damage the box at ...


2

Under "normal" driving conditions, the synchromesh should need only a fraction of a second to allow an upshift to engage. Under hard acceleration, you will rev the engine higher before initiating your upshift, so there is a higher speed difference for the synchro to take up, so it can take a bit longer. Downshifts can take longer; for upshifts, the input ...


2

Having had a clutch failure in my early driving days, I can attest that one can change gears or disengage without use of the clutch pedal, but not without the use of the accelerator pedal. The answer is in the difference of force being applied. When you are accelerating, you have a substantial amount of force being transmitted from the engine. In order to ...


2

9V is still enough to operate the relay, but not enough to operate the starter. It's not just a matter of voltage but the internal resistance of the battery, which if high enough will just bring the terminal voltage down to the point that nothing, including the speedo and ignition, will work. A good 12V battery will not fall below about 11.5V even when ...


2

Those are shift cables, there are 2. I suggest replacing both. . .


1

With the belts removed, spin each pulley by hand. If they have end play (jiggle when you pull them towards and away from the engine) then they need to be replaced. If they make a grinding noise or appear to wobble, they need to be replaced. Your situation makes me think that your belt tensioner may not be working correctly.


1

If it doesn't make any sound with the belts off, it could be one of the following: A/C bearing - To check, turn the A/C on. If the noise quits, this is the culprit. I'm talking about the bearing which the pulley rides on when the A/C clutch is disengaged and allows the pulley to free spin. Idler pulley - This would be the stationary pulley (not on tensioner ...


1

Can putting a car which has a broken clutch system into gear with the engine off cause damage to the clutch or flywheel? No. Without strain on the drivetrain (ie: engine running or car moving), there's nothing there to cause it any damage. Without power going through the system, there's virtually no way for damage to occur to the clutch. Can a ...


1

That's part of the gear linkage, either the selector cable end or the shifter cable end, it's impossible to tell which from the picture.


1

Well, you have diagnosed a broken front left driveshaft, once that is fixed then it should work as normal from your description.


1

Replace your clutch as it is worn out. The gearbox is fine, if there was a problem with it, it would be either not transferring power at all, or not engaging in gear...


1

They exist, albeit not commonly. Honda have made 3 - the Insight, the Civic Hybrid and the CR-Z were all available with manual transmission.


1

That sounds like the clutch and, yes, while it is apart do all the bits, but not the flywheel unless it needs it or it is a DMF.


1

I would take a look at the slave cylinder. If you are wearing out master cylinders something is not right. It may be the slave cylinder has worn away a pocket in the release lever. This is supposed to be lubricated with special grease. It's not easy to get to, but it is external to the transmission. Check the interface to see if there is rust or ...


1

It is possible that you have a warped pressure plate which prevents smooth engagement of the driven plate. It is also possible that your driven plate is exceptionally hard, or lacks all the springs in it that it was designed to have. (That is it is not as soft as it should be.) Those are just theories, and if the problem bothers you enough, you get to ...


1

The short version: nothing would happen, everything is fine. Turning the wrong way for a short time is not causing any measurable wear or damage. Long version: 1.) How would this affect the engine? Car in first, rolls backwards. The engine would turn backwards. Every moving part of an engine is typically only loaded in the "forward" direction, if you ...


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