Hot answers tagged

11

Being as it's only 0.05mm larger in diameter, you shouldn't have a problem unless you're using that socket on a rattle-gun every day. If it's a 6-point socket, the wear on the nut should be minimal (12-point sockets have more of a chance at 'rounding' the nut). Ideally, however, you should go down to the shop and spend two dollars on the correct sized ...


8

On GMs now adays the Engine Control Module controls the starter relay. It will look for a park/neutral signal from the range switch and a crank signal from the ignition switch/Body Control Module. A break down of the starter relay terminals. If you pull the relay you'll see it's labeled on the bottom and has a diagram on the side. 85 - ECM sends power to ...


8

I'm having a silimar issue with my Toyota Yaris which I'm yet to fix, but I know for sure what is causing it: rust on the ABS sensor. Every wheel has an ABS sensor which reads the wheel speed. During braking, if one of the sensors read 0 and other sensors have a different reading, the wheel is skidding, so the brake pressure must be released a little. (This ...


6

Looking at the video, it appears to be an electrical problem. It looks like the main power leads are losing their continuity when you turn the key to activate the starter. This issue could be ANYWHERE along the main lines of your power cables. Mainly four points to look at: (+) connection at battery and at starter; (-) connection at the battery and grounding ...


5

It sounds to me like the previous owner suspected an outer CV joint (which was my first thought when you described the problem) and changing it didn't fix the issue. I would double check that the outer CV joints look new and there is a good chance the problem could relate to one of the inner CV joints. Diagnosing the problem will likely be a case of ...


5

You should definitely try to extract it. Preparation: Heat the manifold with a blowtorch Jolt the bolt with a pin punch Soak the bolt with bp-blaster or another penetrating oil Removal If the bolt is protruding: Place two nuts on it, counter them against each other and try to screw the bolt out. If the bolt is protruding but not enough for the two nuts: ...


3

When this happens, the first thing to do is buy a Voltmeter. Test the battery (or lug it to the autostore where they can test it for free.) If you have the correct battery and the battery is resting at 12.6 V. The next thing to look at are the terminals and posts. Are they clean, if not buy a wire brush, baking soda wear kitchen gloves or get some ...


3

The first thing to do is too take the EGR out of circuit. A quick and easy way to do this is to cut an old metal oil can(its thin enough for scissors) so you have a piece of the can that will fit between the bolts of the EGR. Tighten the EGR bolts up with the can acting as a gasket. Now try watching the MAF sensor voltage as you rev the engine sharply and ...


3

Here's how it breaks down. The stock tires have a rolling diameter of about 24.4 inches (assuming a rolling diameter of 97 percent of the specified diameter, which is typical for passenger car tires). The 195/65 tires have a rolling diameter of about 24.23 inches, or about 3/4 of a percent less than the stock tires. Clearance-wise that's a non-issue. Your ...


3

Depending on the engine in your car, it could look differently. Below is the routing on the 4-cylinder engine. The V6 routing is just below it with the red arrow pointing to the tensioner. There should be a square hole in the end of the tensioner right at the pulley which you can place the tool. Lever it so you can loosen the belt and remove it. Here's for ...


2

When trouble shooting a cranks but won't run condition it comes down to three things Fuel, Fire, or Mechanical Fuel - Spray either or starting fluid into the air intake while trying to crank the vehicle. You may have fuel pressure but not enough, this will rule out a fuel problem. If it runs you have a fuel problem if it doesn't you don't. Fire - Check to ...


2

You may want to check with the dealer, I have 2011 cruz and have had similar issues with it. I used my scan tool and oscilloscope to find that the ECM had my coils out of time. I suspected something else must be causing this. I eventually got tired of complaining to them. They called me up and said they would put an ECM in it and see if that would fix since ...


2

After consulting some online databases (google.com), special dealer equipment is needed to program the remote for a 2012 Malibu. Some GM cars to have a manual procedure to learn remotes, but this doesn't appear to be one of them.


2

Could this really be a manufacturing defect? Could this be a defect in the part which was put on your car? Possibly, but not probable. When cars are put together they are put through a lot of different tests to ensure parts are put on correctly and are done correctly. Union people tend to take pride in their work ... at least lately they seem to be. I would ...


2

There's a few possible culprits from your description. Just to cover all the bases: test your battery voltage, it needs to be above 12.6V for a healthy battery, above 11.8V to start a car. Since you've been having trouble, give the battery a boost before testing have your ignition switch tested, it may not be making good electrical contact test your fuel ...


2

After a lot of research, I decided to start by trying a pair of vice-grips on what was left of the stud. I cranked them down real tight, and it came right out. If that didn't work I'd have been going down the route of drilling, welding, or other more terrible options.


2

Thinking more, you turn the key, massive voltage drop as the starter tries, 1) bad earth to the engine: connect the battery's black wire to a good metal part of the engine, as it is trying to earth through your wiring system. 2)try if you can to turn the engine backward or forwards by hand with a spanner on the bottom pulley, the starter motor could be ...


2

This sounds like one or more of the wheelnuts or lug nuts have come off and the remaining ones are loose. Get this checked and have new nuts fitted as necessary. The studs will need checking as well. Do contact the place that fitted the tires as they may have left them loose. It could, however, be that someone was stealing your rims and were disturbed - ...


2

Theories are correct. You have a small coolant leak into the engine, could be a head gasket or other gasket that allows coolant to lean into the engine oil area. Its hard to diagnose but can be done. Preferably done with a hot engine (some coolant leaks only occur with a hot engine): Drain oil and leave plug Out, pull all spark plugs, next connect a ...


2

The problem was that the handle on the gear-stick was loose. There is a linkage inside the shaft of the gear-stick that gets pushed down when the driver presses the button on the gear-stick (unlocks the gear-stick). The handle had become loose, due to the set-screw becoming partially unscrewed. This meant that the handle/button did not fully engage the ...


2

Edit: Having seen the added pictures, I wouldn't call any of that "heavy rust". Brakes usually look a lot worse than that around here and still work fine. This is what heavy rust looks like. So the answer below may not be much good anymore. Your brakes may still need replacement but it might be worth getting a second opinion. Orginal answer: The ...


1

The internal voltage converter (LED lights need conversion to run off of automotive voltage) is probably heating up and opening an internal circuit or opening a PCB trace. The only easy solution for this problem is to replace it. A good verification test would be to press and hold the brakes after you start for a few minutes to see if it goes out. If it ...


1

For a quick and dirty repair you can just use a threaded rod with the same thread size/pitch and cut it to size. You could also use a matching bolt and cut the head off (use a high grade bolt). Attention: automotive engineers love to use some unusual thread size/pitch, perhaps you want to measure the thread with a matching gauge. Do not forget the anti-seize ...


1

If you go to, or call, a dealer they should be able to tell you (or sell you) what you need. If you luck is good you may be able to find the information by looking at a parts diagram if you can find one.


1

It sounds like there is a wiring problem with the coolant temperature sensor. It is difficult to say whether it's a short or open but wiring none the less. When a wiring problem is detected, the car goes into a limp mode. It sets the internal temperature to 70 degrees F. This makes the gauge drop. It runs the radiator fans full blast all the time and it ...


1

Lathejockey81's comment on the other answer: .05mm < .002 in. That's less than a hair, and well within most manufacturing tolerances on precision machined surfaces... which a socket is not. No, there's no need to get a 19mm socket, and it will present no difference in performance just because the number on the side is different.


1

Try this, put the key in and leave it in the run position for half an hour. This should learn the key to the anti theft system. You may also want to hook up a battery charger. If that fails a scan tool will be required.


1

There is much to be said here; You first should have done an electrical connection probe test to know if your fuel pump is operating, your sparks are sparking, your coil is sparking, your injectors are igniting, your distributor components are working, == the vehicle timing is correct, your starter is kicking, your Fuel Injection Main Relay, Coolant ...


1

This is because bacteria live in your condition system, I'm from the EU so I can't recommend you a good cleaner for air condition systems, but I think in any good shop the salesman will recommend. And replace the air cabin filter. It's good sometimes before turn off car turn on heater to max for some seconds to dry possible condensate (where bacteria lives)....


1

Warning try this at your own risk I have heard this works on a ford motor... Spray a little penetrating oil down around the spark plug to help loosen it. Let sit for about 5 minutes or until a decent amount of the oil evaporates. Put a rag over the spark plug hole to prevent anything from falling in (or possibly fly out). Quickly crank the engine one cycle ...


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