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Grinding a crankshaft is a process of removing material from the journals in an effort to refurbish and reuse an expensive, yet vital component of an engine. It is usually done during the process of rebuilding an engine when needed, but also has some performance aspects which come along with the process. Let's first off describe the anatomy of a crankshaft....


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https://engineering.purdue.edu/ME463/Course%20Documents/Design%20Resources/starrett-inch-metric-tap-drill.pdf This is my favorite chart for tap drill sizes. The chart incorporates tap sizes and the drill necessary for drilling before tapping threads into the hole. There is also a metric section off to the side. 1/4 20 would be a #7 drill bit or 0.2010 ...


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A crankshaft wears with use. After a lot of miles, the play between shaft and bearing becomes too much. The more play, the lower the oil pressure, the worse the lubrication. And then it wears out even faster. You can grind a crankshaft, camshaft, or any shaft to make it round again when it's worn out. You replace the bearings with thicker/oversize ones, so ...


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There is a formula for it.... take the nominal size (.250") and the reciprocal of the threads per inch (20TPI = .05). .250 - .05 = .205, the drill size. Here's another 3/8-16.... .375 - .0625 = .3125 . Metric is even simpler you don't use the reciprocal at all... M8x1 is 8-1 = 7mm M5x.8... 5-.8 = 4.2mm. Of course, many of the SAE sizes require odd-ball ...


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what is standard DIN 874 says less than +/- 3 microns over a 300mm "sharp edged rule" If you purchase a "straight edge" from an engineering tool company, it will most likely meet this specification. for a "steel rule" DIN 874 defines four grades Flatness tolerances are Grade 00: 1+(L/150) Grade 0: 2+(L/100) Grade 1: 4+(L/60) Grade 2: 8+(L/40) E.g. ...


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First, it's not spun on a lathe to make it round again, at least not the typical machine lathe you'd think of. It's a machine which has a huge grinding wheel, thus the reason we call it grinding a crank. The setup looks something like this: (Sorry for the small image.) In the image, you can see the crankshaft is setup on a machine. In the back, there is ...


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Replace both along with the brake pads. You can probably get away with replacing one, but you replace them in pairs so that you can have brake balance between the two wheels. This is the same reason why you would replace brake pads in pairs. If one wheel brakes more than the other, it can cause your car to "steer" in one direction while hard braking. So ...


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It will almost definitely be cheaper to buy a reconditioned engine and drop that in than trying to sort out a seized engine. This is because you're going to have to pay for a lot of machining work in addition to replacing all the damaged parts. Even if you're saving some money on the labour aspect by doing the tear down and reassembly yourself.


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HSS-E steels are HSS steels alloyed with Cobalt. Cobalt makes steels harder and increase the heat resistance. Detriments are the increased breaking susceptibility and reduced toughness. Source in German Since heat resistance is of no concern in your application I would choose TiN coated HSS taps.


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for a little background, I am a Kia master tech. Hyundai and Kia are brother sister companies who share mostly the same drive-train components. both companies have had issues with the 2.0 or 2.4 litter engine installed in your vehicle. I would suggest bringing the car to the dealer (if you have not done so already) as it may still be warrant-able even with ...


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The correct drill size is also determined by the hardness of the material being tapped, and the "thread class" (tightness of the match between the mating threaded parts). Softer material generally gets a slightly smaller hole.


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if only the cams were seized the crank would not be locked solid, it'd move slightly I expect you're going to need to disassemble the seized parts, add replace or re-finish any damaged surfaces. this will almost certainly involve removing the crank and pistons. support the engine on timbers, jack up the car place ramps under the wheels and roll it off ...


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I would consider getting two. A straight edge flat steel square (machinist square) and a 36" straight edge should cover most standard applications. The steel square will be great for smaller applications like small component mating surfaces. It has two shorter surfaces for easy handling. Even being able to check squareness could be helpful. The 36" should ...


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I don't know of any official documentation, I originally started typing a comment but it became more of an answer. Firstly, You could create an imbalance in rotational mass across the axle. For example, you could weigh a resurfaced brake disc that is just about within specification and compare that to a brand new disc. This difference, no matter how ...


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Most decent machine shops have a large parts washer... best cleaning of block I know of... had several done - came back like new, but you need to oil relevant surfaces quickly.


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My suggestion is to take a Dremel tool or a angle grinder and clean out the weld, then you'll be able to back the nut off. The threads are already buggered from the welding which they were accosted with. Clean up the weld the best you can off of the shaft (and I mean really clean them up), then back the nut off, which should pull whatever debris off of them ...


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Facing is more common with higher time engines, or ones which are suspected of having a warped head after overheats. In your instance, the most likely reason for the recommendation from the shop was to reduce the probability of a disassembly caused by a head which did not seal and resulted in an unsatisfactory mating between the block and cylinder head. ...


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You can try filling the bores with diesel and letting it sit for a week. I've had success in the past using this technique coupled with a big breaker bar on the crank and rocking the bar backwards and forwards a bit at a time. This is far from the ideal way to repair a ceased engine though and assumes that isn't physical damage to the pistons, rings or ...


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But, what about when trying to machine or polish the crankpin journals? These are not concentric with the main journals and there doesn't seem to be any way to mount the crankshaft so that it is spun along the central axis of each crankpin journal Actually, yes there is. You can install the crankshaft off-center on the grinding machine: In this image, ...


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