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54

The first thing I'd establish is to work out if the hub can be removed from the car with the wheel still attached. I encountered a similar scenario some years ago working on a car with locking wheel lugs and no key. I was able to remove the hub cap, dust cover and large castle bolt which allowed me to put the wheel and hub assembly on the bench. Doing ...


22

Do exactly what the manufacturer of the vehicle states in service information. Why do I say this? The nut rotational friction and bolt clamping force are both affected by the choice of lubricant used or lack thereof. Almost all OEM's specify no lube. This is done for several reasons. Dry results in the most thread rotational friction, a most desirable ...


13

As long as the rest are tight (and torqued to spec), I would put a new nut on and torque it to spec. Given that there isn't and left over metal on the stud, like the nut stripped out, I would say it wasn't torqued to spec and worked itself loose. The bang you heard might had been the wheel flinging the nut.


12

There are sockets designed specifically for this job. Here is an example of one; they have a reverse thread on them and are made of hardened material so as you turn them anti-clockwise, they tighten themselves over the locked wheel nut until they are fully tight and the nut begins to loosen. They are made by most tool manufacturers and available from most ...


12

That would be correct. There should be no issue of using the impact with the wheel off the ground. You are exactly right in that the tire should be on the ground when using a breaker bar or tire iron. The reason for this, besides the wheel spinning and you never getting the lug loosened, is because you could torque the car over and cause it to fall off of ...


12

Nope, doing it with the wheels on the ground if fine, no need to lift the weight of the wheels. It's easier that way because the wheels can't turn while you are torquing the lugs.


11

Being as it's only 0.05mm larger in diameter, you shouldn't have a problem unless you're using that socket on a rattle-gun every day. If it's a 6-point socket, the wear on the nut should be minimal (12-point sockets have more of a chance at 'rounding' the nut). Ideally, however, you should go down to the shop and spend two dollars on the correct sized ...


10

I can see where your mechanic is coming from. The reason being that, although like Steve Cross notes, the impact wrench applies a lot of force suddenly, it applies the force in an evenly rotational direction. ANY wiggle in the socket (Which there will always be or you wouldn't be able to get it on the nut) and the breaker bar will be putting lateral force ...


10

tl;dr: No. An impact wrench isn't a cure-all. The mechanic explained that sometimes lug nuts are much over torque because all shops use impact gun to tighten them. That does not cause any problem as long as they are opened using an impact wrench. Well, that's not quite true. Over-torque is bad in and of itself. At a very high level, it damages ...


8

Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately, depending on your viewpoint), that is not a broken lug nut, but the nut which is formed into the plastic hub cap. Take the hub cap off and you'll see the lug nuts. If you notice, there are seven lugs on the hub cap. When you take that off, there will be eight lugs on the wheel itself. This is a standard hub cap for the ...


8

It's just a double check to ensure the wheel hasn't settled onto the rim. If it has, even just a little, lugs can come loose over time. By re-torquing the lugs, you greatly reduce the possibility of it ever happening. If you have a torque wrench and the proper socket, you could do this yourself. To be honest with you, I don't trust the torque the guys at ...


7

This is NOT a good idea.... You must use the correct size/shank of wheel nuts for the type of wheels you're using. An ill fitting nut/nuts will loosen off as the vehicles wheel flexes under load. As a technician I have seen the severe damage to other peoples vehicles, and unfortunately the people themselves from wheel nuts that have come off whilst on the ...


7

The really simple option is to loosen the nuts while the wheel is resting on the ground, and only raise it up on the jack once they are loose (not removed, just loose) Otherwise, if you don't have brakes you will need to look at wedging the wheel or axle somehow. You can use a strap, or wooden wedges, or as @SolarMike suggested, if the wheel has holes in it,...


6

Camber is the angle of the wheel on it's vertical axis - If you have wear on the outside of the tyre, then you have too much positive camber, i.e. the top of the wheel is further out than the bottom - the opposite of the diagram below (from Wikipedia), which shows negative camber. For it to be far enough out to cause such serious problems, I would surmise ...


6

In F1 each wheel has a crew of 3 men to change it. Each wheel has a single precision machined magnesium alloy nut. It and the stub axle have a very coarse thread machined into them to minimise the number of turns it takes to tighten the nut. The nut locking mechanism these days is a sprung auto locking type. Pins in the stub axle spring outwards and ...


6

For stubborn nuts , heat the nut with a torch, then move the flame away and immediately apply WD-40 or any other penetrating oil against the heated bolt threads. The quick change from high heat to to the cool oil will cause the nut to retract and expand, allowing the penetrating oil deeper into the threads to create a slippery surface. You can do this ...


5

These would appear to be "McGard 8-spline" lugs. I don't have direct experience with them, but they appear to come in two sizes: Image from BrandSport Auto Accessories. Never used them, but they had a good diagram. These lugs are commonly called "spline" or "tuner" lugs. They are sold to look sporty (because they are different and cool), provide better ...


5

I agree wholeheartedly with both Ben and Paulster. However, I use a high-power air impact for to tighten, on it's lowest setting, and also have a selection of color "torque stix" with a minimum of three passes (snug, torque, final) while in the air. While not perfect, I think this is a reasonable compromise between my efficiency needs and returning a safe ...


5

Learn from my mistake!! I attempted to use four different chisels to 'counter rotate' the stuck nut. NEVER do this. What happens is that the chisel force drives the annular ring of the lower portion of the nut into the well where the curved face normally sits. You get the rest of the nut finaly chisseled off and you are STUCK with the measley shxxty annular ...


5

I found this good video of how to do it without removing the hub/knuckle assembly from the vehicle. This is definitely one of those vehicles which engineers did not plan very well. Here's the video on YouTube. In case it is ever removed, here are the steps involved (follow safety protocols): Remove the tire, brake caliper, caliper bracket, and rotor. Clock ...


5

Engineers typically design parts to withstand a greater load than they are actually expected to see. This is known as a "factor of safety" and assures the parts won't fail when extenuating circumstances are encountered where the product is stressed beyond the design calculations considered. Given that NASCAR is a very specific type of racing with (...


5

It should not be an issue driving with one lug missing, as long as the other lug nuts are torqued as they are supposed to be. 4km is not a long distance, and especially one you shouldn't be worried about. It would behoove you to get it replaced as soon as possible to prevent further issues, though. As long as you aren't speeding or taking corners at high ...


5

Getting a nut off in this case can be done, how you would attack it depends on access to it. If the nut sticks out you could use a nut breaker to crack it off, or get a big pair of locking pliers, tightening the damn thing down as much as you can. If you can't get a pliers or nut breaker on then I'd try to use a rotary tool and a metal cutting disk to cut ...


5

It was untightened lug nuts, period .Unfortunately , I have done that. Miraculously , I can tell about it. Just as your photo ; all my nuts were missing, 2 studs had broken by fatigue. I had a Nissan Titan , 6 lug aluminium wheel. I rotated tires for a trip, forgot to torque one front wheel. Drove about 1100 miles on interstate, 60 to 75 mph. I felt a ...


4

Quite simply, no it is not safe. If a car manufacturers specifications say 5 studs, that's because they've done their homework on the forces involved. Think of the worst case: braking hard while turning sharply on a rough surface. The mass of the car, acting at an acute angle to the rim, comes down on the wheel lugs with a g-force proportional to the ...


4

In my experience, garages always tighten wheelnuts so much that you have a major challenge getting them undone if you have a puncture. While they shouldn't do this, it obviously gets them in less trouble than it would if your wheel fell off, so they will continue to do it. Using excessive force on a short bar will damage your wheel nuts. Force will not undo ...


4

I'm pretty sure the wheels will not fit. If my research is correct, Nissan's use a 5x114.3 bolt pattern, while the Jetta uses 5x112. Not knowing which vehicle the Nissan rim came off of does not help much. Two other things you need to consider besides the bolt pattern is the offset of the wheel (how it is oriented in regards to the hub mounting point - ...


4

tl dr: No. Not a driver/drill as you've described. Usually, hand tools are used for the tightening of lugs, then followed with a torque wrench to ensure accuracy in getting the wheels onto a vehicle. This is not only the preferred method, but how it should be done. There is one caveat ... if you use torque sticks, you can use an impact gun. A torque stick ...


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