13

If the oil is unused, and unopened, there is nothing wrong with using it. ExxonMobil recommends a five-year maximum shelf life for engine oils, including Mobil 1™ synthetic motor oil. Opened oil can vary in shelf life due to extreme temperature, humidity and other conditions like dusty environments. These things will shorten the life.


12

tl dr - Have no fear of Vaseline and o-rings O-rings are made out of many different materials. I would suggest that those o-rings which are made to work in the automotive realm are made to be resistant to things such as oil, gasoline, and other petroleum products. This would include Vaseline. While Vaseline and other petroleum products may degrade real ...


11

Yes, as Charlie says, as long as it has been stored correctly it should be fine. I generally use the leftovers from one change when I do the next so that it's not sitting around for too long - e.g. if I need 4L and I have 5L cans, I'll have 1L left, so next time I'll use that 1L, plus 3L from the next can.


10

tl;dr: Ambient air temperature should generally not interfere with engine efficiency or fuel consumption, but will affect overall power output. Do not confuse efficiency with power output. These are two separate things. When your intake charge is more dense, you can throw more fuel at it and creates more power. (NOTE: The idea for the engine management ...


10

Mixing new with the old will cause you absolutely no issues. As long as you are using the same weight oil, it will mix up and you'd never know it. Continue to change your oil at the specified interval and you should be golden.


9

Yes you need to replace the grease when you replace the boot. That grease lubricates the joint, if you don't have enough inside the boot the joint can fail prematurely. On a side note don't use one of the quick boots (the ones designed to be put on without taking the CV joint off of the car), in my experience they are worthless. Here is an example of a ...


8

I'm not sure how long any sort of grease would last before it worked its way out? I'd be tempted to go for a more mechanical solution (if you have access to appropriate tools, or a frielndly machine shop) - drill a small hole in the socket and tap it to a suitable thread, then insert a grub screw to bear onto the side of the ball and stop it moving. That ...


8

No. As far as I can tell, there is no reason that Vaseline might gradually degrade the rubber O-ring on which it has been applied. O-rings that are manufactured for automotive purposes do tend to be made in a rather durable fashion so as to be able to withstand whatever sort of fluids that might accidentally get spilt during car maintenance. If you are ...


8

Engine oil is normally kept inside a light-proof steel box (your engine), so you might not find much information on how it's affected by sunlight. However, other industries use lubricating oil that can be exposed to the sun, and I found this report: Sunlight Degradation of Lubricants UV light is the enemy, and it can affect oil: On a molecular level, ...


7

The oil pan never gets hot enough in normal operation to soften the metal of the oil pan or the drain plug, and any thermal expansion at that temperature also shouldn't be much of a concern. For me the ideal temperature is maybe about 20-30 minutes after a drive, or when I can safely put my hand on the drain plug for a few seconds. The oil is still warm ...


7

Two lubes are needed to properly lubricate caliper type brakes. Silicone is used on the slider pins and anything that touches rubber. A generous amount that completely coats the pin, hole wall and rubber expansion boot is needed. Be sure to coat the boot lips that fit in the grooves that hold them in place, this act as a sealant. This lube will not swell ...


7

http://www.jalopyjournal.com/forum/threads/best-penetrating-oil-for-stuck-nuts-bolts.773380/ There was a study done on penetrating oils. Here's the highlights - The break out torque required for: Nothing = 516 ft. lbs. WD-40 = 238 ft. lbs. PB Blaster = 214 ft. lbs. Liquid Wrench = 127 ft. lbs. Kano Kroil = 106 ft. lbs. 50/50 blend of ...


6

The piston rings prevent the two from mixing freely. Note that it isn't possible to have the two perfectly isolated from each other. There will be a little bit of oil that gets burned during consumption, and some exhaust gases will find their way into the crankcase. As these rings wear, the amount of oil lost to the combustion chamber increases. If a four-...


6

Specifically a foam filter for a lawn mower needs oiled, but just lightly. A foam filter lacks the ability to stop small particles as compared to a paper filter. The oil is added to make the filter "sticky" to these small particles giving the foam filter better filtering capability. As far as major engine damage, probably not. Worst case scenario the engine ...


6

Lower "cold side" of the Carnot cycle leads to better theoretical efficiency, sure, but have you calculated how much? 10-20 K colder intake with the same 1000 K combustion temperature affect final efficiency by 1%. And that efficiency is 70% in any case, so you can guess that there are so many more parameters lowering the final efficiency to 25%, that the ...


6

Use the lithium or silicone grease! Copper grease is primarily used to prevent the seizing of parts which become extremely hot, like the exhaust system. But it is not a lubricant in first place. The grease bounds the copper powder, but isn't made for lubrication, an copper powder in a moving bearing can't be good, even though copper is a rather soft metal. ...


6

WD40 is not a penetrant, and as far as lubricants go, it's a poor one. Get a legit penetrating oil at the car parts store. They come in spray cans and range from $7 to $15.


5

I would not use assembly lube with the valves (in the valve guides), but just oil there. The reason for this is because there is no way to flush the assembly lube out of this orifice like there is in other places throughout the engine. My preference is to use assembly lube for the rest of the parts. Assembly lube will keep the parts from chafing (wearing ...


5

Remove the shaft, and throw the boot away. Clean out the old dirty grease, after cleaning the part of course, and replace both the grease and boot. This gives you a chance to inspect the joint, and clean up any dirt residue that will speed up the deterioration of the CV joint.


5

Oil Scavenging Rings There are several rings on a piston. Depending on the application and use of the piston it may have up to five ring grooves near the crown. Here are some points of interest. The top ring is always the compression ring. It does prevent some oil from getting involved in the combustion process but it is not it's primary duty. The ...


5

A bit of a late answer here, but I would agree with the answers already posted: Yes, you can definitely use it. That being said, I would not recommend storing engine oil for more than a few years, since the additives in the oil can begin to settle out of the oil. Store it, as already said, in a dry location with fairly stable temperature and humidity, but ...


5

Don't try greasing anything inside the bell housing. Grease will get thrown onto the friction plate and cause you problems. If the pressure plate is faulty or a previous owner had a heavier plate fitted then the only cure is to change the plate for a "normal" one.


5

In the seldom cases I saw them the manual advised to use soapy water to install them as petroleum based lubes degrade rubber. Normally grease is included on items that need it. Make sure to torque down the bushings carrier as the stabilizer bar is in the "work" position, that is the position the stabilizer bar has when the loaded (normally only the driver) ...


4

Too many either overthink the problem at hand, or have a perverse tendency to distrust "the man," i.e. whoever is determining the current paradigm. Hence, any variety of satisfactory answers are invariably met with alternative/contrarian advise overruling the current best practice. Antiseize compounds are designed for use between contact surfaces during ...


4

By the time you need a fuel filter change it is time to replace the hoses also. Simply cut the hose off the fuel line and replace it using new clamps. When you get you filter ask the person at the counter for a foot of high pressure fuel hose. There was a time when they actually included the hose section and clamps in the box with the filter.


4

You state the mirrors are anodized aluminum, but if the ball or socket are steel, you might try (gasp) intentionally rusting one of the surfaces. Here's one technique for accomplishing that.


4

Yes it might, if it's made from Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) like what is used on some MAF sensors. It might make your o- ring swell larger so it won't fit correctly anymore.


4

Piston rings are first to wear out most of the time. They are under much mechanical and friction stress, poorly oiled, and subjected to combustion particulates. Valve stems seals are under no particular stress and the oil tends to preserve them.


4

I always use anti-seize whenever I'm installing spark plugs of whatever type for several reasons: If installing spark plugs into aluminum heads, it helps prevent pulling the threads out with the spark plug during removal. It seals the threads to help keep the combustion gasses inside the cylinder. It helps conduct heat. It better grounds the spark plug to ...


4

If the transmission is in neutral and the clutch engaged, then if the input or primary shaft of the gearbox drives a pump the box will get lubrication, if the box relies on splash lubrication then it will also get lubrication. However, if the clutch is dis-engaged ie you hold the clutch pedal down then the input shaft won't turn and there won't be direct ...


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