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6

This, in and of itself, is nothing to be worried about. The reason I say this is, it is not part of the sealing surface for a cylinder. There is more than enough meat there to seal the cooling port, as long as there isn't a crack from there radiating out. You will most likely want to have the head resurfaced, even if it is only to clean up the mating ...


5

Classic residue from an engine not worked too hard with low oil change intervals. Stripped and re-built 3 V8's which had that residue (all had done in excess of 100K miles). Took the block and reusable parts to a machine shop to get them cleaned in a chemical hot cleaner. Re-built engine went into a v8 short wheel base land rover (160bhp and quick...)


4

No. This modification is intended for Gen I/II Small-Block Chevy engines only. What I failed to realize was that while the cylinder numbering convention stays the same across Gen I/II SBC's, the firing order is quite different: 1-8-4-3-6-5-7-2 With this firing order, there is no concern about bank imbalance when performing the 4/7 swap: 1-8-4-3-6-5-7-2 | ...


4

Yes, remove all traces of the lapping compound - it is the metal to metal joint between the mating faces that is being tested.


4

The part you don't show on this exhaust valve which is much more important is how the lapping ring looks on the valve. If the ring which shows the lapping looks even all the way around on both the valve and on the seat, there really shouldn't be much to worry about. The seal is what's truly important here. If this area looks like it varies around the ...


4

This valve can absolutely be salvaged. You just need a valve job. You can have a look at what's entailed in a valve job by watching this Jafromobile video. To the uninitiated, I won't go through all of the steps involved, but I'll go over some of the pertinent points so you'll understand why this will work for you. During a valve job, there's two basic ...


4

Not only should it be cleaned off, you want to ensure you don't get/leave any on the valve stems. You'll wear out the valve guide in short order if you don't. Remember in engine building, cleanliness is next to godliness. You want to ensure everything remains as clean as possible and this means removing all of the lapping compound. Clean it all and don't ...


3

Yes it must absolutely cleaned off. The compound is an abrasive paste, as such on initial start up it will be ingested into the engine. The outcome would be the same as leaving some fine sand on the top off the piston while assembling the motor.


2

Yes, ATF is highly effective at cleaning carbon, but Marvel Mystery Oil is even better (it's ATF mixed with dry cleaning fluid). If cold, allow the fluid to sit for at least two days, then spray with carb cleaner. The longer, the better -- many guys have freed frozen piston rings without disassembly by letting the fluid sit for weeks. The warmer you make ...


2

Do not try to lap this (or any of your valves which may look like this) without getting them cleaned up first. You must know carbon is a very tough substance (remember what diamonds are made of, right??). Given that, if you tried to start lapping this you will cause some major scoring on both the valve lip and the seat. It will be just plain ugly. I'd ...


1

Used it a lot back in the early 70's, seemed to be common knowledge in all the Dealerships and was Very effective at removing carbon deposits on the pistons and cyl. Head areas.


1

I have an LS2 that makes a sound similar to that sound but it was an upper valve tap so i put some Seafoam in the oil before the oil change and now the sound is gone. It also could be the exhaust manifold bolts are broken causing a noise that sounds like an upper valve tap. Speaking form experience it's probably the manifold bolts are broken. Good luck ...


1

Unfortunately, there aren't any terrific ways of testing these things with a meter because of the internal electronics. In addition, at least one measurement you make might (will probably) be polarity-sensitive, especially if you use the "diode check" function on your multimeter - that's the A-D reading. Using "diode check", reading one way your meter should ...


1

I drive a genesis coupe for some time now I have been experiencing the same sort of issue- though through forums I have somewhat come across it being normal. I have had my spark plugs replace have had a major emissions clean done on my vehicle as well as other maintenance things. Engine wise its bone stock-exhaust included I changed out an idler pulley ...


1

Does it make the vibration when in park? If not, I'd suggest you may have a vacuum leak after the throttle body or possibly your Idle Air Control (IAC) valve is not functioning correctly. If you are not experiencing any rough running at off idle, it has to be something which would only affect it at idle, or it could be slight enough that you are not feeling ...


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