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26

Being a auto locksmith, I can 100% recommend that you have your door lock rekeyed to match your current ignition key. Cost will depend on location and if you remove the the lock yourself and take it to a shop or if you call a reputable mobile smith to come out. I charge about $90 for mobile service and a simple rekey like this. The lock is simple to remove, ...


13

Installing an aftermarket security system (possibly even two-way or with cellular communications and a GPS-tracker) would be your best bet if you are concerned about car being stolen. Locks are often model-specific and I don't believe it would be an easy task to retrofit a newer lock into an older car. Generally, any car lock, new or old, can be opened very ...


10

@Enot has an excellent answer but I still want to contribute a little as well. Specific to your questions, Auto locks made in the 90's I would argue are BETTER in many cases than their newer after market counterparts these days. Many older locks used side bar designs (like the GM door locks, Ford ignitions, Chrysler locks) where the newer replacements are ...


4

With older cars, the value of the securing the vehicle is not in preventing it from being stolen, but rather preventing the contents of the vehicle from being stolen. Other than joyriding, most cars from the 1990s would have little value to a thief. There are almost no demands for parts for vehicles from that era, unless someone just happens to have a ...


2

Your cheapest option might be to leave everything keyed the way that it is and simply have separate keys for the door and for the ignition. You'd have to get a key made for the door, but that should be cheaper than rekeying the lock. This is what I do with my house, which has two different locks on different doors. One of those keys only gets used on very ...


2

It makes no sense to change the locks in your car, because it isn't locks that prevent a car from being stolen. Door locks can be bypassed with a slim-jim, or a good old-fashioned brick will smash a window. If you want to prevent your car from being broken into don't have anything valuable within sight, if you want to make your car hard to steal then invest ...


2

They are packed with grease to reduce wear and provide many years of life - key cylinders, cable mechanisms, shifters, actuators, levers of all kinds, . All that grease does not interfere with electrical conductivity. If you remove it, you will reduce the life expectancy of the part.


1

Ironically for the OP's question, the 90s is where cars started to be harder to steal because of the widespread addition of immobilisers. These were required by law in Europe from 1998, but most cars had them before that. I know my 1993 Peugeot 309 had one. As other answers have said, with the addition of immobilisers, theft of cars became relatively rare. ...


1

You can probably retrieve that piece that jammed in there using a thin wire bent into a hook shape. Better would be lockpicking tools but those may not be available to you, a thin paper clip should work okay. You would work it into the back of the lock and then pull the debris out, as soon as a bit pokes out you grab it with a pliers and get it the rest of ...


1

Nothing says style like having external locks on your truck, but I've committed worse sins. I'm not going to comment on the legalities, external locks are common on delivery vans so I'm assuming it's not an issue. I would make sure both sides are unlocked when you drive to make sure you can be rescued in an emergency! As for what kind of lock I'd suggest a ...


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