Hot answers tagged

12

There is a screw behind the pop out cover, used to remove the door panel. This may not be exact match to your car, for example only. Image thanks to Jason C.


12

There are sockets designed specifically for this job. Here is an example of one; they have a reverse thread on them and are made of hardened material so as you turn them anti-clockwise, they tighten themselves over the locked wheel nut until they are fully tight and the nut begins to loosen. They are made by most tool manufacturers and available from most ...


10

On the 2003 Corolla the release for rear seats is in the trunk. There are two knobs close to the hinges of the trunk. Those are the rear seat back releases. If you push them toward the rear of the car they will pop and release the rear seat backs and you can fold them down and access the trunk. This assumes of course that you have access to the inside of ...


10

Well, here's what ended up working. From inside the car, roll down the window. There's a piece of rubber weatherstripping along the outside bottom edge of the window, pry it out gently with a flat head screwdriver. It's only held by little tabs. Remove the inside door handle. It's 1 screw, then you need to slide the handle assembly forward (there are 4 L-...


9

This is quite easy, but you need to do yourself a favor and get a factory wiring diagram. It will save you hours of frustration and confusion. The factory wiring diagrams will tell you exactly when the circuits are active and when they aren't. On top of that they will tell you the colors and sometimes the current flow. You really don't want to hook up a ...


8

I have had a similar issue with remote controls before. Just for completeness, I've already listed two things you've already tried -- they're primarily for anyone who reads this some time in the future. Replace the battery You already know this one, but it's the easiest and most typical fix. It's also pretty inexpensive, so a good thing to try. If you get ...


7

The fact that you can hear some noise from the door with the inoperational lock is an indication that the wiring is fine. There is a good chance that the door lock actuator has gone bad and needs to be replaced.


6

I strongly recommend a greaseless lubricant (LPS makes a good one, as do other companies). Graphite is technically better, but is very messy and hard to be effective with. I discourage WD-40 / oils as they tend to attract dirt that causes you to need to clean/relube it sooner. I strongly discourage grease and silicone lubes, those make a big mess and lead ...


6

Unfortunately, I think this is simply a consequence of living in colder climates. The only long term solution to this problem would be to somehow seal off the locking cylinder from condensation and the elements, which would be nearly impossible to do if the only method of unlocking the door is by physically inserting and turning a key. A word of advice for ...


6

PROBLEM As you can see in the photo, on the lock actuator replacement part for my car door there is a plastic part (left) and a metal part (right). The two parts, metal and plastic, are supposed to move as one unit. If the unit is rotated anti-clockwise then the door lock will be in the locked position. If the door is rotated clockwise then the door would ...


6

With difficulty ;) Remove the door card (interior trim) if it's not off already - this should reveal a number of holes in the inner skin of the door. Using a small mirror and a torch, try to work out where the wire has gone - it'll probably be in the most inconvenient place possible! You'll then need to use something to try and grab it - I'd recommend a ...


5

What you are wanting to do is possible. I've had similar experience and desire for my 2010 Camry. From my experience, reading messages from the OBD-II port wasn't getting me anywhere. It was like the CAN messages were only a response to me manually manipulating the the car. I would get a message response from locking or unlocking the doors with the key ...


5

All Honda's have this feature starting in 1988. Its a device that makes it difficult to lock your keys in the car. To lock the door from inside, you have to hold the door opener latch while locking the door and the lock will go all the way down. Read your owners manual. It will be in there.


5

For those trying to use graphite, a little trick I learned of in a camera repair manual is to use a liquid to carry the graphite into the areas you're trying to lubricate. The liquid they used in the book was lighter fluid as it evaporates completely leaving no residue, so it will carry or wick the graphite you have mixed into the lighter fluid and then the ...


5

It sounds like the lock on your driver's door is stuck (leading to the first symptom), which has led to it constantly sending the "lock" signal to the central locking, causing the second symptom. If you can get the door open, you should be able to disconnect the central locking wiring from the lock to stop it locking the other doors, then investigate why ...


5

I've had central locking refusing to stay locked with several cars when any of the door sensors (or boot lid sensor, or even engine cover sensor) thinks its door is open - whether it's actually the case, or the sensor has jammed for some reason. This hypothesis can be checked by setting the interior lighting to the setting where it lights upon open doors. In ...


5

You can use a wheel lock removing set. I believe most automotive stores will sell them. They can also easily be found online. Or you can drill the nut and stud. Which takes a long time. It would be faster & cheaper to pay a mechanic for a half hour labor to remove your wheel locks.


4

Usually the OBD CAN bus is 'bridged' onto the other CAN buses of the vehicle, in order to facilitate diagnostics of ECUs on the other buses. However, the bridge may only pass diagnostic messages onwards :( It's different on every platform. In terms of the protocol - it's a classic reverse engineering problem. You need to capture a few traces of the CAN ...


4

We had the same problem on a late 2005 W169. Note you do not need to remove the door card if you just want to remove the door lock cylinder and exterior handle. Once you've loosened the bolt holding the cylinder accessed from the side of the door (On ours it was a T20 - T15 would work but there's a chance of rounding off the head) there is a catch above the ...


4

Try using some graphite lube on the lock cylinder before you give up on it. If you remove the lock cylinder, disassemble it, and clean it, you may improve it's function. You should also be able to get the lock cylinder re-keyed at the dealer or a locksmith prior to installation.


4

The principle is the same as if you've left a door ajar ... the system will not lock the door. I've had this happen many times in my truck where one door or the other doesn't close all the way. The system recognizes this and won't lock the doors. I will click on the remote twice to lock and then acknowledge (through a horn beep) the locking of the doors. The ...


4

You need to find a way to open the door, slim jim or other tool. Once the door is open you need to remove the lock cylinder to get the broken key out. Depending on the vehicle how hard or easy this is. The cylinder may have been damaged and would need replaced and re-pinned to your key, this would require a locksmith. If you can remove the lock cylinder ...


4

You could take the screw out of the center of the knob. Remove it, then put it on only to shut off or turn on the fuel.


3

There is de-icer you can use. Here is an example from Loctite. Spray it in the lock. It will keep it from sticking as well as ease how much torque it takes to turn the key. If this doesn't help you, there is a mechanical problem with the door linkage.


3

Even if you connect to the correct bus and broadcast the correct CAN message you still run into the issue, of transmitting a CAN message that is already being transmitted by another ECU. The way CAN works, every can message has an Arbitration ID also referred to as the message id. Under normal operation, no ECU will ever broadcast a message with the same ID ...


3

If I were the guy who designed the electronics, I would make it impossible to do this via CAN-Bus simply because you get bluetooth adapters for OBD2 that someone standing outside the car could pair with and send the unlock instruction to. It's a safety hazard, so I wouldn't support it.


3

Professional locksmiths (my best friend is a CML) will tell you to never use grease, oil, WD-40 or the like inside a lock cylinder. That stuff collects dust and dirt, gumming up the pins in the lock cylinder. Graphite is the way to go, and your local locksmith should carry a plastic tube or rubber squeeze bottle which has a very small tubular opening about ...


3

A tiny shot of WD40 injected with the attached straw does a decent job for me.


3

On my 2004 Mazda3, turning the key and holding it unlocks all doors.


3

The problem persist and I remove the door card yesterday. I figured that the reason is the mis-aligned rod connected to manual lever used to open the door from the inside. It somehow gotten loose from the guide and blocks the spring/switch (it looks like a spring) connected to the actuator. So there is no way for the actuator to work on-off. I also figured ...


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