Hot answers tagged

18

It sounds like your alternator has not been tightened enough and the serpentine belt is slipping because of it. Since you have new belts on your engine, this is probably about the only thing which it can be. If you press on the belt with your thumb at the center of the long portion of the belt (between pulleys), you should get no more than about 1/2" inch of ...


18

Since you lost power to your 12v accessory socket at the same time as the other systems, I can’t see this as being an computer malfunction. This sounds to me like you have a fault in your main fuse box which is taking out a number of circuits. There may be a bad connection of one of the main fusible links. Unbolting them and cleaning may fix it. You may ...


10

You may have a loose or corroded engine ground connection. The next time you have the electrical failure, leave the ignition switch ON and, using a voltmeter, measure voltage between the negative post on the battery and any shiny clean metal part that is bolted to the engine block. This should always read zero volts, or nearly zero. If it reads something ...


8

Most likely the second latch just needs to be lubed. Of course, you need to get the hood open in order to do that! Depending on the shape of your front grille, though, you may be able to get some penetrating oil or some kind of tool in to the latch mechanism (the lever you need to press is on the very front of the assembly). Failing that, with the hood ...


5

I would have it towed to a repair shop. But it sounds like the master cylinder is bad. If the reservoir is full and there are no signs of leaks, its most likely the master. But you do need to have this checked by a qualified mechanic.


4

According to this site (and another site I saw), the change interval for your Subie should be at 105k miles.


4

There are 3 areas to focus on: Battery: Make sure your battery can still hold a charge well as cold is going to show problems first. Double check that your battery cables are tight and not overly corroded. Starter: As Bob asked, if the starter is the original it could be going bad and struggling under only tough conditions Electrical/Ignition Switch: If ...


4

What you describe sounds the cooling system failing to hold pressure. There are two obvious causes of this: A failed pressure cap or its gasket. This would cause low pressure in the cooling system and allow the coolant to boil. A leak between the combustion chamber(s) and the cooling system, the most likely place for this to happen is at the head gasket. ...


4

I don't like those "preprinted" marks anyway. You are much better off following the sprocket alignment pictures below. After the belt is installed and the tensioner properly set, crank the engine over BY HAND (in the running direction) at least four full revolutions, and check that all marks come back to perfect alignment. I've done dozens of these, and ...


3

On page 5-69 of the 2017 Subaru Forester Owner's manual, there are instructions for enabling Bluetooth and connecting devices. Function no. 5 enables/disables Bluetooth. I recommend procuring the exact manual for your vehicle from the Subaru Vehicle Resources page, which should contain a full description of the exact function of your vehicle.


3

That green terminal thing looks like a battery terminal designed to provide an easy disconnect : when parking at an airport for a 2 week holiday for example. It needs either removing, cleaning thoroughly and re-fitting or removing and replacing with a quality new one.


3

When the rear diff fails, one of two things can occur which will let you know it's gone south: Noise: - When driving, you'll be hearing a lot of noise from the rear, especially when going around a corner. It could start out by it having a lot of whining, with it continuing to get louder over time. This usually happens when the bearings start going bad, ...


3

Until you have ALL the bolts for engine and transmission threaded don't tighten ANY of them.


3

Subarus are very picky about thermostats; you need the OEM one. I'd start there, and then bleed the system; again, Subaru's are picky, and there is a bleed procedure to follow. If both of those are done correctly and the problem persists, I'd still be looking at the head gaskets - especially if I didn't know who did them. If a JDM (Japanese Domestic Market) ...


3

The brownish color of the coolant means that oil and coolant circuits mix. This is most probably a symptom of a leaking head gasket. If this is the case you should have it repaired asap, as it typically affects not only heating but also lubrication, and this can seriously damage the engine over time.


3

Welcome to the site, and thanks for putting in a good amount of details. The fact that you have replaced the battery and your seat motors still work when you have the issue eliminates a bad battery or main battery connection. The symptoms sound a lot like a computer issue to me because the computers control the dash lights, ignition, either the computer isn'...


2

Sounds like an Air Passage issue to me. This could mean: a bad Mas Air Flow Sensor or maybe a poor Throttle Body Sensor, and maybe even a clogged EGR Valve or a dirty Throttle body Unit. These items can clog with carbon and need to be cleaned or replaced after time. These items cah each be checked with a Probe Light Tester first to make sure you're ...


2

Got the damn thing out finally. Had to use a rotary tool to cut the head.


2

If you are talking about this: It appears to be a captured bolt ... you won't get the bolt itself out by itself. Look on the back side for a nut to take off, then the whole thing should come out. The hole just below it and the thing protruding through it appear to be an alignment nib.


2

One of two things happened: While you were attaching the jumpers to the Legacy, you dislodged the connection and caused it to go black. You attached one side or the other backwards on the initial attempt, causing a short, rather than a jumper circuit. I'd suggest your issue was actually #2. Since there was a lot less juice in the Legacy battery than what ...


2

Turned out it was the driveshaft.


1

My guess would be electrical connection loss due to heat. Remember that the "engine temperature" you're reading is the coolant temperature, and something farther away from the engine that isn't directly in contact with the block will take longer to heat up. Perhaps some form of wiring is breaking or otherwise losing contact due to thermal expansion, but ...


1

From what you describe the stability control should have kicked in. Check the VDC/ESC light is on when the igntion is first turned on. That tells you the system is operation. If you suspect a problem then take it the dealer. Sounds like you should be under warranty still.


1

The transmission is out of position - usually when the transmission mount is a little worn. The best solution? once the engine is mated to the transmission, put a block of wood on a solid part of the engine (the crank is good), and use a crowbar to push the engine back while an assistant lowers the engine slowly. Once it's in the slots, use a similar method ...


1

There is a piece often referred to as a dog bone in the engine compartment. It's actually the pitch stop mount, bolted to the firewall and the engine (mount? I don't have the car in front of me right now). Unbolt this from the engine, and the engine will slide right in.


1

Cold air indicates no coolant. You might have a simple problem of a leaking coolant bottle or broken radiator. You may have the dreaded Subaru Head Gasket issue. I'd get a sniff test done, to see if the coolant is getting into the engine, and a pressure test to see if the cylinders are all around the same pressure. Do you have a Turbo, or is it the NA ...


1

Low coolant can cause there to be no cabin heat because the coolant is not able to be circulated thru the heater core. I am surprised the mechanic did not check the coolant level. Obviously, when the coolant level gets low enough (empty in your case) it can not be circulated thru the system properly, causing the engine to overheat. The system will need ...


1

Turns out it was the accessory belt. It was a small enough problem that I just ignored it until one day I heard a snap, and no longer had power steering (belt broke). Replaced the belt, tightened it up, and it's been good ever since.


1

The first thing to check is all the fuses. find your fusebox find which fuse is for the AC (usually labeled HVAC) remove it and inspect the tiny S-shaped filament in the middle, from the side (compare it to other fuses if you're not sure). It needs to be 1-piece AC controls sometimes have their own fuse, so remove your AC control panel and look for a fuse (...


1

As it turned out, the car needed a new thermostat and a new pressure cap. So, these respondents were on the right track for my particular problem.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible