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11

The reason for this is LEDs don't draw as much power as regular incandescent lights do. By putting the LEDs into the vehicle, you are making the vehicle believe the lights are out because of the lower draw. The indicators blink faster to indicate to you, the driver, there is a bulb out which needs to be changed. One way to fix this is to put a resistor in ...


5

After hours of tracing cables, removing panels and taking apart more of the car than I'd like to admit, I figured the issue out. Apparently there's a cable for control current (or something like that). The control current had gone out. The car still kept thinking the lights were on, as the LED control circuitry was apparently using the power the car was ...


4

The pictured tape, or any double sided tape for that matter, will fail quickly. Even the industrial 3M VHB tape isn't worth spit, under the hood. Zip tie or find a natural crevice for it if possible and the leads are long enough.


4

As far as I know, automotive-class "blinkers" work as self-timed "multi-vibrator", where the blink time is (somehow) determined by impedance of light bulb. It is very frequent to see on a car when one of its turn bulb (front or rear) is broken, the blinker goes about twice as fast. Your observation also indicates that the blinking speed likely depends on ...


4

The color of light, expressed in degrees Kelvins (K). The sun is about 5800 K. This is called a "temperature," because the hotter a flame or a lamp filament gets, the more it changes from a warm yellow glow to white. The lower the color temperature such as the common incandescent/tungsten bulb, the warmer, softer and more yellow the light. The higher the K ...


4

Yes, there is a deeper meaning behind the wide input voltage range detailed in the specifications you're working from. In general, all electrical components, especially integrated circuits, have some specific range of voltages they operate under. Although a professional electrical engineer would have no issues designing a stable power supply with very ...


3

You'll need a double-throw switch, i.e. one that can switch one output to either of two inputs. I'd get one with an off position as well (often labelled on-off-on in shops). Before wiring it up, you'll need to check your car's wiring diagram to see how the existing interior lights are wired - you'll need to do yours the same way. It will depend if the ...


3

Bulb resistance is your problem, but physics aside, you have a few options: 1) Purchase an LED specific blinker relay. Google will help. 2) Wire a resistor in parallel with your LED. 3) Purchase LEDs or LED blinker assembly that is labeled as "error free" or CANBUS compatible. These come packaged as the same resistance as a typical bulb. Edit: My 2c... #...


3

More than likely, the leds in the light assembly are being over driven for reasonable light output. Typical 5mm and smaller leds, including the typical 5050 or 0805 SMD leds used in these assemblies are only rated for 20mA at their typical forward voltage, and at 12V for the assembly are already over driven. I bought many different models to replace car ...


3

Assuming the LED pods are at most 12W that's 1A. For lots of margin you could use 1N540x (where X is 4, 5, or 6) 3A diodes, two for each of the rear lights. The front ones just get wired directly. That's super conservative and will withstand worst-case automotive electrical system transients according to JAE/SAE standards and a fair bit of heat. ...


2

I would separate the supply to the rear lights from the front and use a relay - the two inputs being from either battery, the output to the lights, then there would be no issue of the batteries being connected together. However, you need to charge the auxiliary battery so check out split charge systems - usually some relay that only connects when the engine ...


2

Credit to @Andrew Morton for this answer; which he is happy for me to submit. I simply used PA Soft to disable the checks in the Light Control Module (LCM) by going into "module coding" (or similar?) and unchecking the checks, then writing the coding data to the module. Make sure you read the coding data from the module first! Consequentially, this means ...


2

LED bulbs will not give the light output (lumens) needed for good vision at night. The "ordinary" halogen bulbs you replaced are better than LED for lighting up the road at distance at the moment, however this could, and probably will, change in the not too distant future. Stick to replacing the HID with another HID or go back to halogen.


1

If you want them "always on", why would you connect the new strips to the headlight/DRL circuits at all? Just connect them directly to the switched 12V accessory bus, through a fuse.


1

The power rating of a resistor is how much it can dissipate continuously, and being a "power resistor" that would be at a surface temperature of perhaps 150 °C. To find out how much power it is actually dissipating, you would need to know the current through it, or, more easily, the voltage across it, when the lamp is on. To calculate the power ...


1

After searching around I try to cut it open this weekend and the result was a complex circuit for my understanding. I'm post it here if someone is interested to see or explain how it works. So I ended up removing the whole circuit and creating a simple circuit with resistors and 2 diode the classic old way and hope that the LED want burn quickly.


1

As has been pointed out the fitting of leds is not an issue; they fit and electricity use is lower. What is a problem in some countries is that led lights are required to have an automatic headlight aim levelling system to aviod dazzling oncoming drivers. If the car has leds retro fitted, then the car may fail a subsequent “fitness test” (MOT, roadworthy ...


1

Replacing halogen bulbs with LEDs will not have a negative effect on the electrical system. Some cars have a lamp testing system that will alert you if the bulb isn't drawing the correct power (burned out) and LEDs, due to their lower current draw sometimes cause these to alert. However this isn't an issue with your car. As a matter of fact, the bulbs ...


1

you wired your relay wrong. see pic.


1

It may require some experimentation to get it right, but perhaps a small reed relay will do what you want. Connect the coil in series with the LED, and connect the contacts in parallel with the switch.


1

Absolutely. A few caveats. Ensure the lights you are powering are 12v ready (assuming the jumper pack is 12v as well). Then you just need to worry about two things. First, where to safely house/keep the battery while the bike is in use. You want to ensure the leads coming off the battery pack do not come in contact with anything metal on the bike. If ...


1

You can use a mix of both yes. Just remember that if they are for indicators to either add inline resistors to the led bulbs as these draw much less energy than the incandescent bulbs and will flash too fast or not at all. Or instead of resistors change the relay. Hope this helps


1

For most part they are water proof or at least water resistant depending on brand. Make sure your connectors or socket is also insulated and preferably heat shrink installed to keep water to minimum if placed in a wet area. As for installation location is best choice where first protected from water, dirt, and physical damage. But you also want install ...


1

With long wires you have an inductive coupling to stray noise. Put capacitors across each switch such as 0.01 -1uF ceramic.


1

There are two things here that sound like possible culprits: When the bike is running the voltage seen by the LEDs will be the output of the alternator or generator, which will be around 14.2 V, depending on the LED you're using that might be enough to cause problems. The sparks. They are not a good thing. They imply that there was a sudden rush of current. ...


1

Did you factor in the resistance supplied by the fuse? Fuses will add resistance (of some level or another) and smaller fuses (smaller conductors) will supply more resistance. But, as noted in the comments, check the voltages at various points (before and after each element). Also, where is the fuse on your diagram? UPDATES Occasionally when wiring I'...


1

Some cars have timers that keep the lights on for so many seconds after you close the door, this is done with an electronic timer and the timer may not be compatible with led's, leaking voltage. Only solution is to locate the timer and wiring diagram for it and bypass the timer, this would require some skill.


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