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4

If it was sealed when you opened it up you should seal it when you close it. Automotive manufacturers don't ad unnecessary steps or materials to their car building processes, so I'd trust their judgment. You want to clean the old sealant off of the cover and rim, then apply a bead of fuel resistant automotive silicone sealant like Hylomar Blue or Loctite ...


4

It's perfectly fine if you leave the cover as is with slightly imperfect sealing. Even if some water would get to it again (which is not an ordinary event itself) the only bad thing it could potentially do is falling through the seal and getting into the fuel pump electrical connection causing it to rust over time. But this scenario is highly unlikely. There'...


4

The fluid you're seeing is pure water. The purpose of at least one of the hoses (which, I can't tell) is to let the water condensed in the AC system fall to ground. An air conditioner reduces the temperature of air, which has moisture. Colder air can hold less moisture, and therefore, it reaches its saturation point when cooled, and the water condenses. ...


3

Because the coolant system is pressurized what you tend to find is that if you fix one leak the resulting increase in pressure in the system leads to another weaker spot failing - as @Solar Mike said in a comment this could easily be down to age. Coolant hoses are typically rubber and as rubber ages it grows less flexible, since the hoses are likely the same ...


3

Judging by the quality of repair it looks like an failed attempt of an DIY fix. Generally leakages in tanks are fixed by welding, which requires the tank to be drained completely. Epoxy or putty to cover up fuel tank damages is fairly an amateur and dangerous attempt.


1

Exhaust leaks can only be found if it's bad enough for the Oxygen sensor to detect it - which is unlikely. Investing in a $30 code scanner for your glove box is a great thing, but it's unlikely you have a pending DTC to tell you what's up. Since this is a 5.7 Hemi, I would recommend changing your oil before you do anything. As the owner of one, I've learned ...


1

There are no gaskets or seals in the area you circled. The adapter into the injector is a tapered thread connection, and the connection to the hard injector line is accomplished by a compression flare. I would take every connection apart, clean everything carefully, and reassemble with the upper end of a proper torque value. It may just the compression ...


1

That could be from either of two sources: most likely, this is from the oil that is in the incoming air to the turbo, from the crankcase ventilation system. The outer housing is bolted to the backing plate and the clamping force may not be even around the periphery. the high pressure oil feed - that banjo bolt is usually sealed with copper washers and may ...


1

I've had diffs that leaked until I got around to sorting the gasket... But if the pinion seal is pouring the oil out then it needs to be done as soon as.. So, should be fine until the 17th but get them to sort it.


1

In the process of building a car, you take a whole bunch of stamped sheet metal components, fixture those sheet metal parts into to a precise location then spot weld the components together to form the shape of the car's autobody. The easiest way to fixture parts accurately is to use punched holes and slots as locators for pins in the weld fixtures. ...


1

That "black goo" is from the failed hub or bearing seal. It needs replacing and most likely the bearing as well. This should be done asap, as it will breakdown.


1

It could be from underneath the seat from accumulation of water originating from a rusted section of the wheel well . If there is a hole in the wheel well a spinning tire on a rainy day would propel water inside. It then accumulates and wicks up in the seat and exiting the seat belt hole. A body shop technician would confirm this and offer a repair solution....


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duh---its not that simple. 134A is very corrosive and the schrader valve is STUCK. Obviously if it were not- he could and would have been able to get it off. I would put a few drops of the correct oil on top of the valve core- and heat up the area from the outside- where the schrader valve is. Then keep making an effort to remove it----Dont do it so hard ...


1

Had the same problem, Coolant going everywhere. changed the plastic thermostat neck, changed the water pump. Still coolant going everywhere. Took the timing chain cover off to reseal and discovered that the chamber inside the motor mount that is bolted thru the timing chain cover has a hole in the top for ventilation I guess. Well over the years it sealed ...


1

There is a MUCH easier way to resolve this issue. I know this post is older, but admins, please advise future repairs to give this much easier method a try. Drop the exhaust on the truck/van, and access to the top of the fuel tank is a breeze. It took me about an hour, and I’m no mechanic, to replace my fuel evap hose on my 2006 Ford F-150. Once the ...


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