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4

If it was sealed when you opened it up you should seal it when you close it. Automotive manufacturers don't ad unnecessary steps or materials to their car building processes, so I'd trust their judgment. You want to clean the old sealant off of the cover and rim, then apply a bead of fuel resistant automotive silicone sealant like Hylomar Blue or Loctite ...


4

It's perfectly fine if you leave the cover as is with slightly imperfect sealing. Even if some water would get to it again (which is not an ordinary event itself) the only bad thing it could potentially do is falling through the seal and getting into the fuel pump electrical connection causing it to rust over time. But this scenario is highly unlikely. There'...


4

The fluid you're seeing is pure water. The purpose of at least one of the hoses (which, I can't tell) is to let the water condensed in the AC system fall to ground. An air conditioner reduces the temperature of air, which has moisture. Colder air can hold less moisture, and therefore, it reaches its saturation point when cooled, and the water condenses. ...


3

Because the coolant system is pressurized what you tend to find is that if you fix one leak the resulting increase in pressure in the system leads to another weaker spot failing - as @Solar Mike said in a comment this could easily be down to age. Coolant hoses are typically rubber and as rubber ages it grows less flexible, since the hoses are likely the same ...


3

Judging by the quality of repair it looks like an failed attempt of an DIY fix. Generally leakages in tanks are fixed by welding, which requires the tank to be drained completely. Epoxy or putty to cover up fuel tank damages is fairly an amateur and dangerous attempt.


2

The short answer is no, there isn't any leak stopper formula that will stop all the possible leaks. Your car is oozing, which is very normal after 200k miles! The longer answer is that the leaks could be coming from many systems: Engine seals Transmission/gearbox seals Power steering unit Cooling system Leaks can come from seals, loose or degraded hoses. ...


2

Half the system is built for gas and half the system is built for liquid. In order to effectively find the leak is to have liquid on the liquid side and gas on the gas side. Refrigerant is the only way to complete this condition. The only way to properly do this is to have the proper equipment or hire someone who does.


1

I'm not seeing any issues here ... at all. It looks absolutely immaculate considering it is going on eight years old. Remember, no gasket or seal does its job completely. You might get a little bit of seepage from them, especially after they get a little bit old. Head gaskets, as long as you don't overheat the engine or disturb the seal will continue to do ...


1

That's the high-pressure fuel supply hose to the fuel rail. You can see the fastening studs on the left, and the last few mm of the rubber tube not covered. It looks as if the fuel pipe has been wrapped with electrical tape and wiring harness wrap. Maybe the leaking fuel has dissolved the plastic tape. Fuel leaks are obviously dangerous and could ignite at ...


1

Looks like motor oil, but one look under the car is worth a hundred guesses. Likely to be drops somewhere on the car bottom that will indicate where or at least the general location of the car that is leaking.


1

Exhaust leaks can only be found if it's bad enough for the Oxygen sensor to detect it - which is unlikely. Investing in a $30 code scanner for your glove box is a great thing, but it's unlikely you have a pending DTC to tell you what's up. Since this is a 5.7 Hemi, I would recommend changing your oil before you do anything. As the owner of one, I've learned ...


1

There are no gaskets or seals in the area you circled. The adapter into the injector is a tapered thread connection, and the connection to the hard injector line is accomplished by a compression flare. I would take every connection apart, clean everything carefully, and reassemble with the upper end of a proper torque value. It may just the compression ...


1

It could be from underneath the seat from accumulation of water originating from a rusted section of the wheel well . If there is a hole in the wheel well a spinning tire on a rainy day would propel water inside. It then accumulates and wicks up in the seat and exiting the seat belt hole. A body shop technician would confirm this and offer a repair solution....


1

duh---its not that simple. 134A is very corrosive and the schrader valve is STUCK. Obviously if it were not- he could and would have been able to get it off. I would put a few drops of the correct oil on top of the valve core- and heat up the area from the outside- where the schrader valve is. Then keep making an effort to remove it----Dont do it so hard ...


1

There is a MUCH easier way to resolve this issue. I know this post is older, but admins, please advise future repairs to give this much easier method a try. Drop the exhaust on the truck/van, and access to the top of the fuel tank is a breeze. It took me about an hour, and I’m no mechanic, to replace my fuel evap hose on my 2006 Ford F-150. Once the ...


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