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4

What's a quick-and-dirty DIY solution for detecting slow air leaks? If you take the tire off and just visually inspect it prior to putting soap on it, you'll most likely find the culprit (ie: nail, screw, etc). If you don't find a "smoking gun", mix a solution of a small amount of dish washing liquid into water. Maybe 20-30:1 (water to liquid)? It doesn't ...


4

The fluid you're seeing is pure water. The purpose of at least one of the hoses (which, I can't tell) is to let the water condensed in the AC system fall to ground. An air conditioner reduces the temperature of air, which has moisture. Colder air can hold less moisture, and therefore, it reaches its saturation point when cooled, and the water condenses. ...


3

Because the coolant system is pressurized what you tend to find is that if you fix one leak the resulting increase in pressure in the system leads to another weaker spot failing - as @Solar Mike said in a comment this could easily be down to age. Coolant hoses are typically rubber and as rubber ages it grows less flexible, since the hoses are likely the same ...


2

No, they are not connected in any way. The EGR deals with exhaust gasses. They can, over time, get plugged with soot or possibly have a mechanical failure (depending on design). The EGR only comes into play after power generation, and has no connection to the raw fuel or fuel delivery system. Unless the leak was directly spraying on the EGR, there's no way ...


2

There are 3 methods I would use. 1 - Visual inspection for foreign objects or physical damage 2 - Use a large tub, fill it up with water. Pump up your tire with air. You may want to go above what you would normally use on your car, but be sure to stay below the maximum pressure rating written on the sidewall. Higher pressure usually means a faster ...


2

You can't prevent it.. Cars aren't remotely airtight (which is a good thing if you think about it), closing windows and setting HVAC to recirc may reduce it slightly but at the same time will reduce your supply of "fresh" air. The cabin air intake is unlikely to be the main source of fume ingress to be honest (depending on exactly where the leaks in the ...


1

There are no gaskets or seals in the area you circled. The adapter into the injector is a tapered thread connection, and the connection to the hard injector line is accomplished by a compression flare. I would take every connection apart, clean everything carefully, and reassemble with the upper end of a proper torque value. It may just the compression ...


1

That could be from either of two sources: most likely, this is from the oil that is in the incoming air to the turbo, from the crankcase ventilation system. The outer housing is bolted to the backing plate and the clamping force may not be even around the periphery. the high pressure oil feed - that banjo bolt is usually sealed with copper washers and may ...


1

In the process of building a car, you take a whole bunch of stamped sheet metal components, fixture those sheet metal parts into to a precise location then spot weld the components together to form the shape of the car's autobody. The easiest way to fixture parts accurately is to use punched holes and slots as locators for pins in the weld fixtures. ...


1

That "black goo" is from the failed hub or bearing seal. It needs replacing and most likely the bearing as well. This should be done asap, as it will breakdown.


1

Generally: Oil leaks are sometimes hard to find: wind, vibration an temperature can distribute oil pretty good. If you are not sure where it comes from, clean and let the motor run until it appears again. Sometimes a piece of cardboard under the motor to drip on, over night, can help too. In your case: Most likely place it the Oil-filter. Look if the O-ring ...


1

As other answers have said it is possible to weld manifolds but it's not easy nor guaranteed to be successful. A lot will depend upon where the hole is and how good the guy is doing the welding. Some just can't be salvaged. Nine times out of ten you're going to be much better off just replacing the affected part - unfortunately as you've already discovered ...


1

duh---its not that simple. 134A is very corrosive and the schrader valve is STUCK. Obviously if it were not- he could and would have been able to get it off. I would put a few drops of the correct oil on top of the valve core- and heat up the area from the outside- where the schrader valve is. Then keep making an effort to remove it----Dont do it so hard ...


1

There is a MUCH easier way to resolve this issue. I know this post is older, but admins, please advise future repairs to give this much easier method a try. Drop the exhaust on the truck/van, and access to the top of the fuel tank is a breeze. It took me about an hour, and I’m no mechanic, to replace my fuel evap hose on my 2006 Ford F-150. Once the ...


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