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10

I believe your clutch safety switch has been damaged You have a switch underneath your clutch lever. It forces you to pull the clutch in to start the bike. There is a small phillips head #2 screw that holds in place. It can be adjusted and slid back and forth to engage properly with the clutch lever. You can see where the switch hits the lever if you ...


6

Two Possibilities Off the top of my head I would look at the following: The clutch start switch - a broken wire or switch will prevent you from starting the bike. It disables the starter relay by grounding it out unless you pull in the clutch. It's located on the handlebar and is integrated into the clutch lever landing. Side Stand Switch - See if the ...


5

Start from the beginning. Check your battery. Then check your fried cables. Try to fix as much as possible. Make sure nothing is short-circuited. If all looks good, pull out the electric wiring diagram and identify all the items which prevents it from starting. Measure all these points and make sure there is no short/open circuits. The obvious would be: ...


5

Background So there is a grounding switch on your clutch lever, hence the need to pull in the clutch to start the motorcycle. Troubleshooting You can disconnect that switch and get a piece of wire and complete the circuit at the connector. Once that's done, make sure you're in neutral and then try to start the bike. The switch is labeled 10 in the ...


4

I got this advice from this website: Go to your rear sprocket and pull straight back on the chain. If your chain pulls away from the sprockets by much, it is probably stretched out. If the chain does not pull away and stays right on the sprocket, then the chain is not stretched out yet. Also, if your sprockets no longer look like points but a bunch of ...


3

Make sure to check all of the safety features that were included on the bike. Kickstand up, in neutral, clutch in, kill switch set to run, and key on.


3

There is a sidestand switch that kills the motor if you attempt to put it into gear with the sidestand down, it's a safety measure. Check that switch at the top of your sidestand to see if the a mount bolt or nut has fallen out thereby loosening the switch and making the vehicle inoperable when you put it into gear.


3

tommyo is correct. that is generally the rule of thumb when it comes to replacing your chain. just place your motorcycle in its center stand then gently pull it away from the back sprocket between your thumb and pointing finger. if it pulls away by half the roller as he says or halfway on the tooth of the sprocket then please do replace it. otherwise you'll ...


3

According to both the Chilton workshop manual and the Clymer workshop manual for Norton 750 and 850 twins, remove the chain from the motorcycle. (I temporarily connect a spare chain to the rear chain to make reinstalling the chain easier.) Lay the chain on a flat surface and compress all the links together. Measure the length of the chain and write that ...


3

The rule-of-thumb I was taught is to pull the chain away from the back of the sprocket. If the chain pulls away by more than half a roller it's time to replace it.


3

Your description was really vague, but here is some thoughts. From what I gather, engine does turn over (i.e. it actually spins), just does not start. For the engine to start, you need two major ingredients: fuel and spark. Obvious first things is to check if fuel is in the tank, and pet-cock is open (if available). Spark can be checked by taking the spark ...


3

The Katana has a fuse for the starter located on the starter relay underneath the rear of the banana seat. Under the passenger. There is a plastic cover over it, so it's not easily seen. The plastic cover is white. Pop that off and check the 30amp fuse. When you jump start a bike, do not have the car engine running, just use the battery. The amperage ...


2

I have a Suzuki Katana that was having the same problem. It would cut out at the stop light or wouldn't start at times. I checked plugs, wires, and fuel. It turned out to be just a defective battery. Now she runs like brand new! PS: Get the expensive battery with high amperage because Katana's are picky when it comes to the power supply. Duralast batteries ...


2

You should place the old battery back in and check if it starts there.. If it does, then there could possible be something faulty about the battery you replaced it with (Try getting a brand new battery instead). After the bike fell to the side, was there any damage? Check if anything was broken (e.g. power cables etc.). That could be one thing to do, just ...


1

Had problem like this before, it turned out to be the coil, once it got hot it separated an internal contact. I fitted a new coil and it was fine. If you can get a known good spare that would be a good test.


1

Bought a used clutch lever with cable that you just pull off old & bolt this replacement. Diassembled old assembly & found someone previously changed out clutch lever only so all broken safety switch was still installed. Diassembled sidestand switch. It was corroded beyond repair, so will buy new one.


1

To do any sort of bench testing would need a rig to mount the carbs and a method of driving the airflow : one person that did cover how to do this was David Vizzard for Minis, see here as I remember he was porting cylinder heads - he built it himself... Not for the faint-hearted.


1

First thing you do is check the battery with a multi-meter (as mkaatman said). If the battery is good, it will have a reading well over 12.5vdc. If it is below this, put it on a charger and get it to 100%, which while sitting should be around 13.1vdc or more. I suspect the power level of the battery is going to be much lower than this and believe your ...


1

Put a multimeter on the battery or take it to an auto parts store and have it tested. If it's dead, charge it. If it's not dead, start tracing the power. A wire could have burnt up at a switch or perhaps there is a fuse that has died.


1

I realize this question is old, but despite good intentions, none of the answers provided are correct. Simply measuring slack in the chain (between or at the sprocket) is not sufficient as chain tension can be adjusted easily on these bikes. You need to measure how much the chain can stretch when tight. According to Suzuki's service manual, you should put ...


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