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I'm assuming that model has a simple 4WD transfer case and not one with a front-to-rear differential. That means that there is no "slip" in the driveline. Generally you feel this when you try to turn at low speeds as a "binding" often accompanied by creaking or popping. For a vehicle in normal condition, this causes no damage other than slipping the ...


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From the Yukon PDF Link to PDF


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Where did the replacement engine come from? Look up a VIN decoder for the Jeep online. That'll tell you which engine it came with. Then check the engine serial number (it's on the block). More google-fu will tell you if it's the same model of engine that the car came with. If not, you then need to use Google again to match the ECU to the Engine. If you ...


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No problems with that - the "4WD" button on the Patriot just locks the torque split at 50/50 between front and rear, normally the AWD system distributes power as slip is detected. Driving on a dry highway at 50 you'll have used (slightly) more fuel with it engaged than not but that's about it. To quote the operators manual: This can be done on the fly, ...


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There are several patterns of rotation for vehicles. When a vehicle has a space saver spare then patterns of side to side, cross or front to rear are applicable. As you have a full size spare then that can be included in the rotation and is what I would consider normal. See The patterns for all these with details can be found here : Tire swapping ...


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The conversion is a do-able DIY project. The easiest method is a donor vehicle or purchasing a kit. Most of the off road on-line suppliers offer kits. You will need to read some user reviews to determine which kit best fits your needs. The price range is from $300 to $700. Some kits are more complete than others. The Parking brake will work in the same ...


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Judging from the fact that there are no rear brake rotors available for a 1998 Jeep Wrangler 2.5, I'd have to say that you must have drum brakes in the rear.


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Yes Bevan go to the link below To page 21-528 about half way down the page it shows Engine stalls when shifting into r or d It will show no codes the techs need to read the manual not there tester as usual http://www.lx.abodiesonline.com/Manuals/NAG1%20Manual.pdf


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Looks fairly normal perhaps slightly high of the tooth centreline. What are the issues that make you think you have a problem...


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It doesn't sound like it's likely you have any lasting damage as you didn't run out of coolant, it just got low and you caught it fairly early. It could be a straightforward coolant leak from a hose or a lose connection, however, since you said it's near the idler pulley it's very possible it's the water pump. The pump may have failed or it may be the gasket,...


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Two things come to mind: The cabin air filter is faulty and causing the noise. Something has fallen into the defroster vents and is now causing an issue. You can probably pull the fan out and take a look, but it will take a little digging to get to it. Something is interfering with it, that's for sure. The bottom of the blower motor looks something like ...


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They're not going to be compatible. Look at the code on the PCM, and then look it up on an interchange site; you'll find that Jeep and Dodge 6.1 engines never come up in the same list. Also, to make the PCM work in another car - even one where the PCM is a direct replacement - it needs to be programmed to the cars VIN and Mileage, and the keys need to be ...


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There are a couple of things which I believe would make it so I wouldn't do that: More than likely, even though they are the same base engine (6.1L Hemi), they are still tuned differently. The variance in the tunes could introduce unforeseen problems. If it is a bad PCM, how do you know if whatever caused it to happen might not do that to the swapped in PCM?...


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Whether you will be able to repair this depends on the part. If this is a stud that is inserted into the part and has sheared, you can likely drill it out and use a Screw Extractor to remove the left in part (use lots of penetrating fluid too). This would require you to then find an appropriate stud to replace it with. If it is not a stud, you will have ...


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