33

You can use either jack you want For safety sake, don't get under the car unless you have some jackstands. It isn't the jack failing that kills you. It's the fact that you only used a jack and didn't have any backup. You NEVER use a jack alone if you are getting underneath the car. You ONLY use a jack to change a tire on the side of the road and you ...


26

You could always look into jack stands that are typically used for heavy duty trucks and semis. One time I had a lifted truck I had to go to Northern Tool and purchase high reaction jack stands: Item link That said I wouldn't recommend using anything other than the jack stand. Even if you are using a block that block could still break from the pressure ...


19

Wood. It's plenty strong. Cut some 2x6 or 2x8 and stack them accordingly. This is the most cost effective way to solve your problem. The only danger you will encounter is if you used rotten wood. I realize the picture is not 2x6's, etc, but, it displays the idea.


16

Hydraulic car ramps are a great option if you can source them. They give oodles of clearance by lifting the wheels themselves. You have to drive the wheels into them before using the hydraulic pump to lift the ramp. Drive-on ramps operate on a similar principle - just drive onto them


13

Adding this as an additional answer since I was reminded of it after seeing Zaid's answer. Hydraulic lift jacks are fairly pricey so I always wondered of an alternative and there is an item that has come out that is on my wish list called My Lift Stand. It is great if you do not need to access the brakes or require a wheel to be off and it adds additional ...


13

The safest method to increase the jack height without purchasing more equipment is to work in a level surface that provides a natural "grease pit" environment. Assuming you only need more room to maneuver yourself under the car: parking LEVEL/FLAT over a steep curb, gutter, sidewalk, gulley, etc. will give you that extra room to move. From there you can ...


11

This is a good recommendation The wood will compress a bit when you lower your car down onto it. The jack stand will dig into the wood as well. The benefits related to this related to the vehicle slipping on the jack stands. I've never had a piece of wood fail doing this, although soft white pine sometimes comes out looking pretty beat up. To answer ...


10

You're not likely to be able to get inches by over inflating the tires, and if you try you're likely to exceed the design pressure and run the risk of popping the tire off of the rim. That would be dramatic. Things you don't want to do: Trust a jack of any kind when you're working underneath the car. Trust concrete (cinder) blocks (they may be ok if they ...


8

It is ABSOLUTELY safe. I do this all the time. Mind you I usually use a piece of 2x4, though. It spreads the load over more of the frame or body and keeps the jack stand from doing any damage. The jack stand does dig into the wood, which is much better than digging into your vehicle. The wood can crack. The wood can do a lot of things. But once the wood is ...


6

I'm going to take a different approach to this. As pictured, it's perfectly safe, and sometimes recommended to spread out the pressure to avoid damage. However, I've also seen a pile of wood used to extend a jack's height...and then fall over. Don't do that! (The car in question landed on the freshly-unpadded jack with the oil pan...messy.)


6

It partly depends on the car you are using them with - in the photo you've added, the pad on the stand has a slot in - so I'd guess it's being used with a car that has a lip on the sill - that lip would sit in the slot and the top of the pad would be against the sill of the car - thus avoiding damaging the lip. The most important thing is to make sure the ...


6

For most situations if you're putting the SUV up on 4 stands @JPhi1618 is correct, only 1/3 to 1/4 of the vehicles weight is sitting on each stand. I have put a Toyota Sequoia on 3 ton stands and they are steady as a rock. The Sequoia has a curb weight of up to 6,000 pounds. At that I was still no where near the rating for each stand. Even putting just the ...


6

You have a great answer but more to add than just a comment Have jack stands and a plan Position the car on a flat surface solid surface and give yourself work room Lay out the tools and parts Emergency brake, park or reverse, and chock(s) Have a plan for exactly where you are going to jack and place the stands The owner's manual should have in ...


6

I have in the past used the spare wheel laid flat to support a car after lifting it with the jack. especially when working on a dirt surface. another trick is to drive one wheel up onto the curb, or park the car over some other natural hollow.


5

Jackstand points on that car should be placed on the pinch welds near the door. underneath the car toward the front. Where to properly jack up and support a car In that video he explains how to do it. NEVER under any circumstances should you place jackstands underneath suspension components, or anything that has the capacity to move around in any axial ...


5

Ramps, like these; it's what they're made for. Just be sure to block the wheels to keep the car from rolling back down. I think the top platform has a small lip/depression to keep the wheel in place, but I wouldn't trust it.


4

This is most readily left up to user preference. As for me, it depends on what I'm asking the jack stand to do. The rubber pad is there to protect the underside of the vehicle. As you can tell with the jack stand you have shown on the left, the metal top alone concentrates a lot of weight in a small area. The rubber topped one spreads this out some. This ...


4

No, I do not think your setup looks safe. Practical recommendations first, though: I think that ramps are a good idea. I have some that I like very much made of very heavy duty plastic. They have a large footprint so I'm not concerned about a point failure tipping over my support. I think I got mine from Amazon and I certainly didn't pay big money for ...


4

What I do if I'm not sure about the vehicle being stable way up there is: gently nudge the vehicle side to side using only the strength from your wrists. Kind of like when you're checking if a door in your house is actually latched or just resting against the door jam without the door knob's latch actually holding. Or like when you come home late, the wife'...


3

Here are the places that you can place the jack on: Happy Motoring!!


3

Perhaps I will get some heat for my opinion but I do not like the shown jack stands. I have a (totally unfounded) fear that I could hit the lever with my feet and the stand collapses, that the locking mechanism isn't really engaged or that the cast iron extension shatters because some guy in an far-eastern foundry wanted to safe on precious alloy materials. (...


3

When I was doing drag racing, one guy on our bulletin board died because his jack failed. This stuff does happen and the risk is real. As everyone said before: Use jack stands, and if you don't have any: go buy some. They're cheap and your life is worth a lot more.


3

Generally you put the block on top of the jack - This means the weight of the engine is spread of the relatively large area of the block, rather than the much smaller area of the head of the jack, which helps to protect the rather fragile, thin metal of the sump.


3

It depends. It is not safe to assume that jack stands/axle stands are rated one way or another in all cases. There are cases where the weight rating is for the pair, such as these Craftsman jack stands or these Pittsburgh jack stands. Alternatively, some jack stand sets are rated per-stand, like these Duralast ones. There are a few ways to check. As a ...


2

There's no issue with doing this as long as you place the jack stands in supporting places on the side of the car and the car is on flat, firm, level ground. Your statement about "... this should be safer than jack stand all four wheels..." is a bad premise. As long as the jack stands are at supporting places on the car and you are on flat ground, there ...


2

I'm not seeing an issue here. I'd have no issues crawling under this vehicle the way it's setup to do work. I've done it under a lot more sketchy looking situations (stupid sketchy, which I'd never do again), but what you've got going on looks solid, especially since you've given it the jiggle test and it hasn't budged. Obviously, none of us are there to ...


2

For the Cobalt I would say that the jacking points are where the jack stands need to be placed, as per the image found here for a 2005 Cobalt. My recommendation would be to: raise the front up with using a jack on the subframe (engine cradle) place the jack stands at the jacking points, with jack stand pads or (blocks of wood)


2

If you want to use something other than a Pantomime Jack ("Widowmaker") at the factory pinch-weld Jacking/Support locations, you should use a high-quality Pinch Weld Adapter (Link only for reference, not brand suggestion) for Jacking, and a Flat-Top Jackstand with a Pinch-Weld Adapter for Supporting the vehicle.


2

Each axle stand will be rated for 2 tons - but I would not use them at full capacity, (half or 3/4 only) just a habit of mine especially if they are "cheaper" ones.


2

Because many people don't check the stands capacity when they do jobs - they just grab the nearest... Also, some vehicles may be loaded and heavier than what some think. Also, the heavier rated stands tend to have a wider base increasing the stability when the vehicle load is on them.


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