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You have no problem when you can park the car in a garage. Therefore the problem is 100% related to parking outside in the open. My boy's car was outside for months, and suffered from bad condensation on the inside of windscreen. Turned out the car faced south (away from sun) and the windscreen got coldest. There was water pooling in the spare tyre well, ...


5

The trick is to get rid of the moisture when your car is nice and warm. When you park at the end of the day, open the doors (or windows, but doors are faster) for a minute and let the warm moist air escape, otherwise all that moisture will condense on your windshield as it cools down. Source: Live in a cold climate


4

Cover it Cover the windscreen on the outside with a small tarpaulin, or an old bedsheet. Weight it down on the roof, and on the scuttle. Do not trap it with the wipers. The idea is to keep subzero draughts away from the outside so that it doesn't chill the glass. This prevents condensation from forming on the inside. Used reliably in Northern England for ...


-1

When the car is in motion, all occupants are breathing warm moist air into the car. When you park and close it, most of that air is still there and can’t escape. The cold outside then chills the glass, which chills the air closest to it, causing it to release the moisture it contains—onto the glass. That's why opening the window a tiny bit helps. If wind ...


7

We had a Ford Ka that constantly fogged up as you describe. It turned out to be a badly fitted windscreen that leaked water in slowly. We tried to patch this by putting in the sealant around leaking areas but in the end, a new windscreen was the solution for us. Finding that there was water getting in was very hard and took weeks of effort. We could ...


2

Some certified tips from someone used to living north of the polar circle. Avoid all sources of water into the car. Are the mats wet? Take them out when you exit. The fluff you scrape off the windows in the morning? wipe it up, get it out. Ensure that you and your breath is the only source of water. (that is still too much, but unavoidable) Clean your ...


15

If you can't find the source of the moisture, you can use a work around. You say there isn't a problem if you leave the windows open a little to ventilate the car, but it lets in the rain. A solution to that is to fit wind deflectors. Although intended to deflect wind, you can leave the windows open an inch without rain getting in. The stick-on kind aren't ...


3

The condensation occurs because there is a difference between the temperature of the air inside the car which has enough humidity in it that when the temperature of the air outside drops, and the wind blows, the windshield temperature drops faster than the air inside the car. When the windshield temperature drops to the dew point, the water condenses. When ...


12

You say that when you close the car, the air inside is dry. This might be the case, but cold air can hold significantly less water vapour than warm air. That is, the same air which was "dry" when you have closed the warm car will become oversaturated with water once it gets cold. And this extra moisture will condensate on those parts of your car which cool ...


2

If my understanding of water is correct, this is happening because the moisture in the air is condensing on the (relatively) cold window. Try putting up a reflective sunscreen on the front window. This will do 2 things. It will make it more difficult for moisture in the air to get to the window. It will also reflect heat back towards the window, keeping it ...


16

I think the point everyone else (and you) are missing here is if the weather is cold enough the temperature of the windscreen is below the dew point, your breath has enough moisture in it to do exactly what you're talking about. If the windscreen is below freezing, then your breath will first condensate there and then freeze. This lends perfectly well with ...


31

Check the A/C drains are not blocked. The A/C condensates moisture from the air at the evaporator behind the dashboard. If the drains are blocked you will have a pool of water there ready to evaporate. The moisture will go up through the vents and condensate on the front windscreen. You will need to look under the car approximately under the dashboard. ...


0

If the a/c is working then it collects the moisture inside the car and deposits it outside. As that is not happening you need to check why. And the a/c on my car runs winter and summer 365 /365... keeps the interior dry.


2

This points to moisture being in the car interior. It may not feel wet, or have obvious visible water but when you have moisture buildup in the car like that it's rarely anything else. You need to start looking at your seals to find the ingress point.


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