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tl;dr To combat detonation (in SI engines) To increase power/efficiency Details There are a few important factors at play here. Engine detonation is a real concern for SI engines A spark-ignition engine is more likely to experience premature ignition (aka knocking or detonation) with hotter air. In fact, the calculations in the example below can show ...


9

It is quite likely the work performed has introduced a subtle air leak that only manifests itself under high boost. Pressurizing the intake tract with the car off will help you identify the source of the leak. A hose fitting that isn't honked down all the way will exhibit this kind of behavior under boost. I like how Jafro figured out the source of his car'...


7

I Believe It's a Hose Connection Point Unmetered air whether it's a negative pressure or positive pressure is bad. That being said, I find it interesting that losing some of the boost isn't detected and triggering a CEL. So that maps to your idea of a smaller leak along with the not subtle high pitched sound. You said If it were a bad gasket, I'd ...


4

In short, there are two reasons: Cooler air is more dense, so you get more power from the same boost pressure because you can inject more fuel at the same time. Hotter air will make the air/fuel mixture detonate prematurely (the mix needs to burn at a constant rate, at the exact right moment. It shouldn't "explode"). In the second instance this will mean ...


3

To properly answer your question, yes your car has an inter-cooler. Here is a link to Forge site to a replacement for your OEM one (this prove the existence of the stock one). I cannot find any definitive answer but as far as I can tell most (see lower) VW engines with turbos have an inter-cooler. It is generally located behind the bumper on either side of ...


3

Cooling any gas down increases its density and, therefore, inside a closed pipe, its pressure decreases. Less pressure means less gas velocity. Less velocity, in turn, means less boost. With your approach, you would be wasting the exhaust's kinetic energy instead of using it (which is what the turbocharger was meant for, originally). Therefore, if you want ...


2

If it's anything like the BMW M4 GTS, it's water. Purely and simply water atomised into the inlet tract. This link contains more information.


1

The culprit was right here: If you look closely, I made two errors: 1. I put the clamp on at an odd angle. That was dumb because that made it hard to torque down properly. I should have had the main shaft of the clamp pointing up. 2. I didn't torque it down well enough. If you look closely, you can see a hint of a gap between the metal and the hose. Guess ...


1

A water cooled intercooler is simple. The intercooler core (where the compressed hot air passes through) is submerged in water from the cooling system (sometimes a separate cooling system). That way the water absorbs the heat and lowers the air's temperature. The system has various components. For which the locations are near or in front of the radiator and ...


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