Hot answers tagged

7

No - that's all you need to test. Now drive the car to a nearby garage and get them to do a front-end alignment on it - you won't have gotten everything exactly where it needs to be, so let them fix it to specification. As an added bonus, it puts a fresh pair of mechanics eyes onto your work, so after it's been aligned, you know that everything is good.


7

In 30 years of repairing these units I have never found one to have brushes and commutators that were worn beyond the service limit. The failure in these units is the solenoid contacts. These are not shown in the supplied picture. These contacts take a beating; they generally last about 100k miles. Almost all these starters can be repaired by replacement of ...


7

The easiest way is to check is to jack the wheel up (put it on a jackstand), take the wheel off, clean off the affected areas with brake cleaner, then have a second person push on the brake pedal hard to observe where the leak is coming from. If the fluid is up onto the brake line, I'd suggest this is actually the source of your leak. It could also be ...


4

NOTICE: I've not done this work to the starter you have listed. I can tell you from watching the video and from practical experience which I've had doing similar, this is a straightforward, easily accomplished task. The hardest part of the whole procedure is pulling the starter off of the engine. While you are not replacing the brushes in the starter motor, ...


4

Using a BFH (Big F-ING Hammer), hit the steering knuckle right on the end, directly in line with the arm. Leave the jack in place and don't be afraid of it. Hit it like you mean it. The tie rod end should pop free of the knuckle arm in two or three whacks. The principle here is, the vibration from the hit travels through the arm and dislodges the tie Rod end....


4

Keep the torch pointed at the exact same spot, don't move it around. There is usually dirt or metal shaving nearby that will start to glow orange, that's your cue that it's hot enough. 30 seconds is a good reference, 2 minutes is on the long side. Splash some water on it until it stops sizzling. If it didn't sizzle, it wasn't hot enough. The idea of heat is ...


4

2 things about removing inner tie-rods: Yes, the outer tie-rod (tie-rod end) needs to come off first in order for most tie-rod removal tools to go on In my experience, tie-rod removal tools don't have the grip to handle the amount of torque needed to remove a tie-rod that is seized with rust and age. I've tried them but ended up using a pipe wrench. One ...


3

It should not take a "ridiculous amount of torque" to open up the pad spacing to fit over the rotor. First of all, before you place the new pads you should ensure that the piston is pushed back into the cylinder of the caliper so that it's flush (or nearly flush depending on the design) with the surface of the caliper. How you push the piston in ...


3

Look at the brake light switch, then look for the plastic stopper that the switch plunger contacts. If it is missing or broken the switch plunger does not get pushed in causing the lights stay on all the time. The most likely cause of this sort is failure of the brake switch stopper. An image of a typical broken stopper is seen here. broken brake stopper ...


3

Finding oil in the coolant system most often means a broken head gasket. There is a tester that you can use to see if this is a problem, which costs $35 or so. Amazon has one here: https://www.amazon.com/Lisle-75500-Combustion-Leak-Detector/dp/B0007ZDRUI But you can find a similar tester in most auto parts stores. Basically it will show if there are ...


2

I was a Service Manager for and Acura dealership. Also an ASE master tech. Put the boot in hot water for a few minutes. This will soften the boot, making it more pliable, allowing you to push/slide it in place. They are very tight so they will seal well and have a ridge to help keep them in place. You can put a little grease on he inner lip of the boot, but ...


2

Using a proper ball joint separator makes this much easier - either a pickle fork (basically a wedge that you hammer in): or threaded-type:


2

This is a transmission, not a clutch problem. The only time the clutch itself can make any noise is during engagement/disengagement. You may hear noise if the clutch is slipping, but it wouldn't be slipping (in most every circumstance) in neutral. Since it's still making noise when engaged, yet not when disengaged, the only other place to look is the ...


2

Does it show a check engine light (CEL)? Search for Integra CEL ECU Codes and you will find instructions to show any system codes and take appropriate action. If you aren't getting a CEL then replacing the ECU won't hurt. Very weird symptoms could be ignition or fuel. Difficult to imagine what else it could be based on what you've already done. The next ...


2

Disconnect the battery before doing any work. The solenoid is directly connected to the battery. Should you short it during removal/installation you will get a nice rain of sparks, a glowing hot spanner and a good chance of experiencing a extremely fast oxidizing (burning) car. Speaking from experience: Clean up your shed before disassembling the starter. ...


1

That "nut like" property is called a tapped hole. Either into a casting, through a thick stamped steel piece, or sometimes they actually weld "nuts" to the backside of a piece of stamped steel. Sometimes the holes are "blind" meaning they just end in solid metal. Usually on a piece like this it will be a "thru" hole. ...


1

Seen those "easyouts" snap off making the task even harder... The tool I use involves drilling into the bolt then hammering a hardened shaft which has special flutes cut into it into the hole. Then there are special nuts that slide onto the hardened shaft which turn the shaft and broken bolt. Two points: drill centred and use the largest below the ...


1

The standard way to remove sheared bolt would be to drill a hole in the center of the bolt at use an "easyout" bolt extractor to unscrew the bolt. If there is enough of the bolt sticking out, you might be able to grab it with a pair of vise grips and twist it out. You might also cut a slit in the edge and use a slotted screwdriver to twist it out.


1

To get the best performance from your new brake pads, you either need to resurface (if the disks are thick enough) or replace the rotors. You could run them as is, but again, you'd not be getting the best performance. My own personal preference is to replace the rotors. The reason being is simple. New rotors aren't really that expensive. If you calculate in ...


1

This is the brake fluid tank. Underneath it likely has the ABS actuators, which likely make the sound you are hearing. I'd start by diagnosing ABS (with a scanner). If you don't have the scanner that can diagnose ABS - pull the ABS fuse and start the car to see if the sound is still there.


1

A red ABS warning light has no different meaning from an orange or yellow warning light. The warninght light can turn on for a few reasons: One or more wheel speed sensors have failed One or more wheel speed sensors are covered with road grime One or more wheel speed sensors are unreachable (broken wire) A blown fuse for the system The ABS module is not ...


1

I have had experience re-building starter motors from ride-on lawnmowers right up to large heavy duty starter motors for diesel engines in tractors and Heavy good vehicles. This is, as explained by others, easy enough to do, just take pictures as you take it apart, lay all the parts out in the order they came apart - even pay attention to bolts as some are ...


1

I've been in your situation before and I referenced Carid's write up on New VS Remanufactured which states what is involved in the remanufacturing: A remanufactured part is one that has undergone a major teardown and inspection. It has had all its wear-and-tear components replaced with new ones. Remanufactured parts often distinguish themselves by ...


1

As CharlieRB noted, it is most likely your starter. If your starter is gone, you should have the following symptoms: No turning motion or engine sounds at all (other than possibly some fans and/or pumps). NO MOTOR MOTION. All lights and gauge cluster lights working and lit when the key is in the "ON" position. All lights and gauge cluster lights off when ...


1

Since it was working after the battery change, then quit, it sounds like the starter has failed. If you really want to know for sure, you will have to remove the starter and take it to the parts store to have it bench tested. Once confirmed, half your work is already done. Now install the replacement starter. Note: Check the condition of the cables and ...


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