Hot answers tagged

11

If so, how do you measure the effect? tl;dr: by measuring the tension between the unbraced mount points. Today, I installed a Whiteline rear strut bar on my 2004 WRX wagon. The car has 162K miles on the odometer and has always seemed in need of a little more stiffness in the area of the rear seats. There's a large volume back there without any sort of ...


10

They likely do hold some liability, since they should have known that an AWD should have matching tire diameters across all tires. They may argue that you hold some responsibility since the Impreza owners manual makes this pretty clear: . You must install four tires that are of the same size, circumference, construction, manufacturer, brand (tread ...


9

It sounds like to me this is the general noise an engine makes when being "lugged" or run at a low RPM under heavy load ... basically, it makes this noise because there is a big boom in the cylinder and no place for the energy to go. This really is not good for your engine at all. You should try to be a little more gentle on your engine and drive train.


7

Yes, you have to do that. Your turbo heats up to around 900 degrees Celsius under hard driving conditions. When you shut off the car, You suddenly take away the heat source and the ambient temperature falls to around 95 degrees Celsius (the normal operating temperature for a Subaru that has been driven hard). This causes the turbine housing to experience ...


7

If it hit directly under the front seats, there shouldn't be much to worry about - most of the important bits are further forward or further back. as @spicetraders says, try to have a look underneath and see if there are any scrapes or signs of leaks - a good torch/flashlight is essential. No noises is a good sign, as the most vulnerable part in the middle ...


7

Your car is ten years younger (and has 1/10th the miles) but I suspect I know exactly where you hit. Most likely, the scrape you heard was the plastic under tray. This piece does what it says on the tin: it sits under the engine and catches drips, spills and leaks. It has the side benefit of sitting lower than critical pieces (like the front differential)...


6

Here are the instructions per your owners manual. If all else fails, go back to the manual ... you can almost never go wrong by doing so, especially if you still have warranty left on your vehicle. NOTE: I'll throw some descriptive stuff in along the way to clarify things a little. What @rviertel has written is fairly good, but I have some contention with a ...


5

Assuming you have tested the window switch and wiring to ensure it is the motor, there really is only one way to replace it, but it is fairly simple. You can find detailed directions with pictures here. 1) Remove the front door trim. *Caution, Do not apply excessive force to the clips. Otherwise the clip may be broken. Pull up the inner remote cover ...


5

Sounds like you have the right idea, at least for a temporary repair. You'll have to remove the entire bumber assembly to do this right, and you'll need to go slow as to not break the platic clips and geegaws that hold the whole thing together like a jigsaw puzzle. Because of the special poyurethane type polymers that are used in these bumpers, one ...


5

One tire with a months usage more than the other three will not be a cause of any issues. If you have a tire that is substantially different in circumference to the others, that's bad (which is why all four are generally changed at the same time) - but the damage is usually related to the differentials, not to the wheel bearings. Your tire did NOT cause the ...


4

If it is the same as a Forester, There is a much simpler method than that listed in poisson's answer. Remove door card and seal cover, and unscrew and remove the switch panel. Slacken off the 4 bolts holding the regulator assembly to the door. Unplug the motor from the loom Reach into the door, and undo the three bolts holding the motor in. You will have to ...


4

That's the engine "Lugging". Basically, the expansion is still happening in the cylinder, and it is doing one of two things: 1) The crank is being violently cranked forwards. This is usually when you get the 'pulsing' feeling in the car. 2) The expansion is happening, but the piston isn't moving at the right time. It is not good for any part of your ...


3

What's the best course of action? Figure out where the coolant is going. Here are some ideas: Drain your oil and change it, and the oil filter too. Look for signs of coolant in the old oil. If you see coolant there, good chance it's the head gasket. Check your exhaust for white smoke. If the engine is burning coolant, good chance it's the head gasket. If ...


3

There are companies that specialize in doing this sort of repair. Many are mobile and can repair it in your driveway. A Google search of "plastic bumper repair" of the Bay area showed a listing for a company called "Dent Crew". They specialize in paintless dent and plastic bumper repair. This is not an endorsement for this particular company but an example ...


3

The wiring diagram looks correct when comparing against another wiring diagram. I only did a cursory look over comparing random pin colors. Pin 32 should be Light Green/Black. This may be easier to read... for the 2.2.


3

Sounds like a position switch is failing due to oxidation on the contacts. Typically there is a park or neutral position switch at the shifter and possibly one at the transmission. In a manual transmission, which does not have park, they may be called a neutral safety switch. Next time you have this problem, instead of letting the car roll, I would move the ...


3

The cooling fan and water pump are usual suspects that you did not mention yet. A bad water pump will overheat an engine really quickly because there is insufficient coolant flow, a broken cooling fan usually only becomes a problem when a car is stationary or in slow traffic.


3

If it looks like a duck... Without physically seeing the car I'd be 99% certain that this is to do with the automatic starter. I've never see a car without auto-start technology do this (OEM or otherwise) and aftermarket tech that affects when a car is running, be it an auto-start, or turbo timer can be a bit temperemental. It could be a case of moisture ...


3

Seeing it in place answers the question. It's a Stopper. https://parts.subaru.com/p/Subaru__/STOPPER-PEDAL-B/49247380/36036AA031.html All it does it stop the accelerator pedal from going too far to the floor.


2

Poor acceleration is sometimes caused by dirty spark plugs or clogged air filters. Keep in mind that the spark plugs are probably more difficult to reach on a 99 Subaru than most other cars since the Subaru has a boxer engine. But, if you feel up to it, you could try replacing the spark plugs ( and/or air filter if necessary ) and see if that helps the issue....


2

Should the procedure for this car be same as a 2004 Impreza? I think I would use this video for direction. Should the axle nut be loosened before or after lifting the car? If you are not replacing the wheel bearing, then no. I saw on your video where it says that you can cause damage to the wheel bearing by doing it with the car on the ground. ...


2

You can check the rear toe in exactly the same way you check the front toe -- using the same string setup, parallel to the car's centerline, measure the distance from the string to the leading and trailing edges of the wheel. One thing to be careful of is that the rear tread (a.k.a. track) may be different than the front. When you're lining up your string, ...


2

tl;dr: It sounds like an O-ring failed. Funnily enough, I just solved an almost identical set of problems on my 2004 WRX. Here's how things played out for me: Checked AC on the first hot day in a while - sadly, a whole lot of nothing happened. No cool air, no compressor-caused dip on the voltmeter guage. Purchased two seriously overpriced cans of R134A. ...


2

As they say, you need to let the turbo spool down as it spins excess of 100,000 RPM while doing this oil is used to lubricate it, if you shut it down immediately there are high chances of oil residue forming on the turbo lines and clogging it up. That said, most modern turbochargers do not need(while driving in the city) such cooling down period as such ...


2

Post repair answers to On my SOHC model, there is a left-side timing belt cover that can be removed without taking any other components out, so you can easily take a look at the camshaft sprocket and with a flashlight you can see back to the seal. The sprocket is definitely in the way (and definitely cannot be removed at this point), but you can see ...


2

Because it's hard to get in there and see the camshaft seal, I'm skeptical that it can be diagnosed properly without taking the car apart. Could an apparent oil leak (there's some drippage on a hose underneath the left head) be caused by anything else? How should I go about independently diagnosing this leak? Should I bring this somewhere else for another ...


2

Following the answer from Poison Fish, do these: Use a short No. 2 or 3 Philips bit on a small rachet. Most other Philips with spin and damage the screw. The chunky square kind like from an impact screwdriver works best. Replace the screw with a small M6 10mm head bolt. Try tightening the screw first and then loosen as some of these have locktite on them. ...


2

It looks like you got most of the steps there but not all in the right order. Allow car to cool sufficiently so that the oil is not hot. This will make the rest of the job easier. Drive car onto low profile ramps and then block the rear tires so that it does not roll back. Put the car in park or in gear and apply the parking brake. Turn the car off. If you ...


2

This is typical of a fuel delivery issue. The only advice I could give you is test, exhaust back pressure, fuel pressure and intake vacuum. Make sure those numbers are correct. If they are all within acceptance, you need to look into testing the head gasket and the engine block itself for leaks. although those cars are great and rarely have problems. They ...


2

There's 2 things you need to know: the damaged item in your picture is a bumper cover, it's plastic, it's only job is to make the back of your car look pretty. If you take it off, you can bend it and twist it with your bare hands. the actual bumper is a horizontal steel beam behind it, usually with styrofoam/polystyrene on it. It's heavy, it's job is to ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible