48

It is a turbo timer. The theory is that an engine with hot turbocharger shouldn't be immediately turned off. The turbocharger may be damaged because there will be no oil flow. The timer ensures that the turbocharger has managed to cool down enough by idling. Now, do you actually need the turbo timer? Probably not. The turbocharger is hot only after hard ...


6

Basically, your car has several circuits: Always On - Connected directly to the battery and is not affected by the ignition switch. This includes: alarm, interior lights, brake lights, headlights, computer memory (radio, ecu, tcm, bcm) Accessory - Items that the driver needs, but are not necessary for the vehicle to run. These include: radio, HVAC, ...


6

The brakes should still work, but without power assist so they take more force. Same for steering. I would shift to N and then brake while heading to the shoulder. I had a K1500 Blazer of about this vintage, and the steering wheel would not lock until the key was rotated all the way back to the "Lock" position, where you can take the key out. If the ...


5

Courtesy of a SNAPON document If the scan tool does not receive data from an OBD II vehicle TEST 1: Connect the positive DMM lead to DLC pin 4 and the negative DMM lead to the negative battery terminal, using jumper wires if necessary. Do not connect to body or chassis ground but to the battery terminal directly With the ignition on, voltage drop across ...


4

Wires carry electricity. Switches are mechanical contacts that disrupt / allow the flow of electricity. In all cases where wires and switches are involved, the wires allow current to flow from one place to another, and switches allow that to be controlled (off / on). This is a general and fundamental idea. Check out this primer on how electricity works, it ...


4

On the front of the aluminium body of the ignition switch, it looks like there is a small screw that will need removing. Looking at the photo of an ignition switch for your car on amazon - http://www.amazon.com/Ignition-Switch-Daewoo-Cielo-Part/dp/B013XF3P1E It looks like there will also be a similar screw on the back of the body that will also need ...


4

can I switch that electronic ignition starting with an old-school key? No. At least, not anywhere near 'easily'. That ignition switch, from what I can see, has about 13 low-current wires. At least a few of them are data lines (CAN bus!). It also directly controls the steering wheel lock (ESA lines). And another snippet: That's very different from an old-...


4

In nearly all situations, the way you stop if the ignition switch is the way you stop if the ignition switch is working: you stop pressing the gas, and hit the brakes. It's literally that easy. Power steering and power breaks will continue to work for a little while because they have built up a charge (as rpmerf points out, you usually get about 1-3 good ...


3

Yes it can be done. There are various options depending on the fault. I have got around every fault the ignition module can give someway or another. If the key turns and but the steering lock doesn't unlock you can buy a emulator for this and wire it to ignition live or have it on a switch. If the key turns, the ignition turns on and the starter turns over ...


3

Most ignition switches consist of two components: a rotary switch, and a lock cylinder (the part you removed the wafers from) that serves as the "knob" that turns the switch – but only if you have the right key. Broadly speaking there seem to be three possibilities here: After removing the wafers the key is free to turn, but the motion is not transferred ...


3

The brake booster will support a few pumps so use 'em sparingly if in such a situation. After that it'll get harder depending on the weight of your car. An MPV will barely slow down without booster, but a standard grocery getter doesn't take much muscle. The steering will get hard only when the car is slowed down to <15km/h. You're probably out of most ...


2

Based upon the information you've provided it sounds like the issue revolves around the ignition switch. It's inconsistent in it's operation and seems like it would be the root cause. If the ignition switch is the issue then part of the steering column and facade around the switch would need to be removed.


2

It is common for the ignition switch on this model to fail. It was the subject of a US federal government recall. The way this switch is wired, if it fails, it can supply power to some systems and not to others. It has one power wire in and four out. In the on position it powers many systems with the black/yellow wire, the heater controls are powered ...


2

This depends partially on the make/model of the car, but there are several different ways depending on what your goal is. With some newer cars, it's possible to feed data to the computer - although I really would not do that. The best way is going to be adding a relay to one of your circuits and having the Arduino control the relay. There are several ...


2

Look for corrosion at your battery cables and especially at the starter connection, and all electrical grounds. Clean off the corrosion with a steel brush if you can, replace the ends and lengths of wires if the corrosion is too invasive.


2

You'll need to check how your inverter/shore power is set up - some systems will only charge the leisure battery and not the vehicle's starter battery. Personally, I'd get a bigger 12v house-type fan and run that - you won't get a lot of airflow from the cabin fan, and it'll be noisier. I'd also look at getting insect screens for the doors/windows so you ...


1

Your tech was correct - pairing a new key to an S40 involves turning the ignition. If it won't turn you can't pair the key to the car. You can't reprogram the key itself (to imitate the old one) as it's they car that programs to the key not the other way around. From what you describe about the sequence of events and how it not won't turn I think there's a ...


1

Why not a magnetic switch on the upper bonnet shroud below the windscreen? Use a black thing that you just put a magnet on as you get up to the car and the magnet is easily removed as well... For the wires just take the fuel pump relay control wire or possibly the ecu feed wire (that may confuse it though if you forget to put the magnet before turning on ...


1

If you are hooked up to mains power, then a possible solution is to use a small inverter (approx 10A) or an "old" battery charger (newer chargers are "smart' and recognize the battery, so may not start to charge) to power the fan directly - otherwise the vehicle battery will get drained.


1

To replace the cylinder, you need to pull the horn button, then unscrew the nut holding the steering wheel on. Once removed, wiggle the steering wheel back and forth (one side to the other) with some force and the wheel should pop off. Make sure to be careful as the steering wheel can pop off unexpectedly and you'll end up smacking yourself in the face. It ...


1

This sounds like a poor or loose connection for the wires from or to the ignition switch or the fuse box. These are the places where those items will have common points of connection - ignition supply, fuses etc so that is where you need to start looking. Do note, finding intermittent problems like this can make finding a needle in a haystack easy in ...


1

While it is possible for the ignition switch to cause your problem. I would suggest taking it to a shop unless you a comfortable diagnosing it your self. When the problem is happening check the S terminal at the starter. If you have battery power then it's the starter. If no power work your way back to the ignition switch. Be aware it could also be a ...


1

You can easily with a system of switches to replace the ignition switch or work in tandem with the ignition switch. These switches will act as your kill switch and can be controlled remotely through your Arduino. You will need the service manual for your vehicle and to examine the wiring diagram for the ignition switch. You will add switches that allow you ...


1

I had exactly this issue with my work transit and it turned out to be a faulty airflow meter and pressure regulator, at times it would take up to five minutes just to get it started again! Don't take that as gospel but definitely make a request to the garage to check everything airflow wise out as the constant need to turn the motor over again and again can ...


1

Yes you can use the ignition cylinder you bought, but you'll need to get a key with the correct resistor in it, then cut it to match the key which came from O'Reilly's. To get the correct resistor, just measure the resistance to your original key. This will match what's in the security system. Put the new cylinder in your column, get the new key with the ...


1

Adding to rpmerf's answer, in cars equipped with an immobilizer they are an integral part of the ignition switch and electronics, so probably worth a mention. There's a few different types but the general idea is: A key with an RFID tag or something more advanced in it. A ring around the ignition switch, or other sensor at the switch, that can read the ...


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