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9

No, you cannot. You state that " I would only have to scrape a little bit to get there safely", however this is not correct - you should clear ALL essential windows before you move the car - the first mile or so as you get out of your neighbourhood are probably the most dangerous, as you will be more likely to encounter pedestrians, cyclists, etc, who you ...


7

Does the air conditioner work? If so, you can blow COLD and DRY air onto the windshield from inside by setting the controls to: A/C, WINDSHIELD, OUTSIDE AIR. The cold/dry/outside air from the A/C will prevent the warm/most/inside air from you from getting to the windshield and condensing/freezing. Even if you don't have A/C, you can try with just cold/...


7

You are correct to assume that this happens because of moisture in the car vaporizing, condensing on the inside of the (colder than the environment) windshield and freezing when the temperature inside drops enough. People bring a lot of water into the car by breathing and bearing snow/rain with their clothing. To avoid this you need to remove as much ...


6

Here's a parts explosion The hose #9 you could drain through. I like the coolant idea. pour coolant in the reservoir, it might take a bit but it will turn the slush into liquid. There a glycerin in it and it's alcohol based so it's miscible with any alcohol in your wiper fluid. Nothing bad will happen. Others chime in if this is ridiculous to you for ...


6

The anti-lock system already monitors the individual speed of all wheels and reduces braking power of individual wheels when it detects it locking. From there, it is just a small step to the traction control systems, which applies the brake to individual wheels when they start to slip. In addition, motor power can be reduced. The Tesla has this system, ...


6

If it's cold enough to have ice covering your windshield, the leftover water will ice up your doors and locks. Depending how soon and how much you use your brakes, you could have some ice forming on the pads and rotors. Daily carwashes will fade your paint real quick. If you do not want to brave the elements, get your car warmed up and use the defrost ...


4

That's an unfortunate scenario. While it's not the end of the world to use 4wd on pavement in your case, you would want to keep the speed low, and avoid tight turns--turn off 4wd if you are going to be going fast or turning tight. But yeah, you are going to be wearing our parts of your drive train (I think transfer case in particular) using it like this. ...


4

The easiest thing you could use right now is a de-fogging agent. Anything which will keep the humidity off of the windshield. What I'm talking about is something like Rain-X. At least this should keep the inside from getting frosted over. Wipers are about the only thing on the outside which is going to work. If you are wondering, the physics behind it are ...


4

First: how to fix. You can take a scraper to the inside of the car window. The windows are definitely hardy enough to withstand having a scraper used on it. I do it all the time, and have never had a problem. However, if you are concerned about it, there is an easy work-around: heat up your car for a few minutes and turn on the heat full blast pointed ...


4

I'm not convinced this would even work. The car has been cold-soaked to a temperature below 0. When you spray water on that cold surface, at least some of it will freeze. If the car wash used warm water you'd be okay, but I don't think that's done in practice (there's no need to use warm water, and it'd cost a lot to warm up the water). If there's any ice ...


3

Your question about being plugged into a charger is an important one. Most (all?) EVs today permit "pre-climate" control in which the vehicle remains connected to the EVSE and will run the air conditioner or heater to accomplish the desired result without draining the traction battery. We had a pair of 200x Rav4EVs which did this, so it's not a ...


3

I would apply a silicone grease or silicone spray lubricant into the opening regardless of your freezing issue, this will definitely help with displacing and preventing moisture build-up. Plus, it will operate more smoothly. To address the problem, I assume this is happening during storage? Can you store it such that it doesn't get wet or snowed on? If it'...


3

When you park at work, try to orient your car towards the south, which will help solar heating of the front of the car. With any luck your ice will sublimate, and when you run the heater in the car the fresh but dry air will further get moisture out of the inside compartment. Outside, polymer coatings such as Rain-X on glass, and wax on painted surfaces ...


2

According to the Data sheet I viewed on line it should do no harm. How effective it will be, will depend on how much it is diluted by the water in the washer tank. The formula may also evaporate quickly in the tank. In short it is better than straight water, but likely not as effective as a product designed to be added directly to the windscreen washer tank.


2

You really need to get the car sufficiently warm that the ice melts. the real danger with using any other method is that any residual film of water can re-freeze very quickly, especially once the car starts moving through cold air. This is quite a dangerous situation as you can very quickly lose all visibility. Note that in many countries it is illegal to ...


2

Another thing that you might have luck with is to run the fan at low speed with the defroster on (assuming you can control the airflow). That will keep air moving over the windscreen and will help both to evaporate moisture and to prevent the windscreen from getting (too much) colder than the rest of the car. You might also try looking for some of the ...


2

You can prevent frost on the inside of the windshield in 2 ways. use a blanket. Make sure the air inside the car is not moist enough to condense into an ice layer. Frost inside the car is unusual, so you may have a leak somewhere, with rainwater coming into the car (check under your carpets). Find the leak, dry out the car (a long drive with the heat ...


2

I would make sure the rubber covers don't have splits in them. then use a water dispersant, WD40 is one example, in copious amounts to get any moisture out. Then re-treat as often as necessary. I had this happen with a throttle cable on a commercial van - the moisture froze and the engine could not shut down - my Dad was swearing a lot about that!!


2

Clean your windshield with a special sponge (most bigger gas stations should have those). Apart from removing dust particles from your windshield (which contribute to fog buildup), they are also treated with something that will further prevent the windshield from building up. If you can’t find any of those, you can make a substitute at home: pour liquid ...


2

The absolute easiest way to keep the windshield clear is to drive with the window open. This will remove the humidity from the car very quickly. FYI, the humidity comes from your breath, so opening the window periodically should work. The only problem is that it might be brutally cold. So maybe instead you can find a way to direct the airflow by cracking ...


1

You hire a breakdown wagon that can lift your vehicle and put it back on the hardtop... safest and probaly best. Dragging it may cause or at least add to any damage underneath. Cheap probably not, but if it falls then cost of replacement plus cost of whatever else it damages on the way down...


1

Yes, defrosting works like with any vehicle - it just uses the battery instead of gas. With the Teslas this happens automatically. If you ask it to start from the app and the outside temps are low, it'll defrost, preheat seats and steering wheel. https://insideevs.com/tesla-updates-mobile-app-cold-weather-features/


1

Running the A/C (with the heat on full) will help to reduce humidity in the car, which in turn will reduce the amount of frost on the inside. This works because chilling the air reduces its ability to hold moisture and causes the water vapor in the air to condense out. If you do this for a few minutes before parking, it will help prevent frost on the inside. ...


1

I do commend you for asking before trying. I heard of one person who tried boiling water on his windscreen: not a good idea. :) As others have already stated, washer fluid will not solve your problem. I agree with @Hobbes: if the temperature is cold enough, trying will result in the fluid freezing to the window. What I do usually is to start the car, ...


1

Try metholated spirits. that should do the trick.


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