Hot answers tagged

9

There are three things I do with a rubber hose to get them removed: I use a pair of pliers, monkey wrench, or vise-grips (depending on how big the hose is). With these I apply enough pressure on the rubber at the point the hose clamp was attached to hold it without deforming anything underneath, especially if what is underneath happens to be fragile or ...


9

It is quite likely the work performed has introduced a subtle air leak that only manifests itself under high boost. Pressurizing the intake tract with the car off will help you identify the source of the leak. A hose fitting that isn't honked down all the way will exhibit this kind of behavior under boost. I like how Jafro figured out the source of his car'...


7

I Believe It's a Hose Connection Point Unmetered air whether it's a negative pressure or positive pressure is bad. That being said, I find it interesting that losing some of the boost isn't detected and triggering a CEL. So that maps to your idea of a smaller leak along with the not subtle high pitched sound. You said If it were a bad gasket, I'd ...


7

Dealer Head to your dealer and grab OEM Exact parts for your vehicle. Aftermarket OEM Find out what brand(s) your manufacturer uses, and see if you can source them sold somewhere else. Often times you can use a manufacturers/dealers parts website and then look for a cross for the part number(s). For example, GM generally uses ACDelco as their OEM, so ...


6

Paulster's first option of grabbing with pliers (or your hand, if possible) and twisting is the best I know, but one option for a tool like this pick that's not made of metal is bicycle tire levers: I have these for bike work, but they come in handy with the car too, any time I need to pry or pick something that might be damaged by a metal screwdriver. ...


6

You can put a plug in the vacuum line or put a cap over the port at the other end of the line. Ask for Vacuum Caps. Note: The air injection system on my car is much more than just the smog pump. I think you should try to understand the operation of the system before you try to remove.


6

Great question. Spring clamps have several advantages from the engineers point of view. They apply even pressure around the joint, screw clamps do not. Screw clamps pull from one side and this can stretch the hose, pulling it to the screw area. In smaller sizes, screw clamps leave a flat spot under the screw fitting; this leaves low pressure areas at the ...


6

I know it sucks Lisa, but no you cannot drive it in that state or your engine will overheat and probably seize up, costing thousands to repair or replace. Don't even drive it to the mechanic, get it towed. I know you say you can't get it to a mechanic, but I'm sure you can if you try. If it really is impossible somehow get someone who's handy with cars to ...


5

I don't know exactly what it's for, but usually they'd put these in there for one of two reasons. They need a hard place to mount the hose so what's holding on to it doesn't wear on it. They are putting two pieces together for some stupid reason. I'm thinking it may be the first reason, but who knows why Honda does anything. As for your replacement hose ...


4

The one simple reason manufacturers use spring clamps instead of worm gear clamps: Cost It costs far less to mass produce spring clamps and use them than it does worm gear clamps. As far as your bonus question goes, I would agree with your gut. There is no way a spring clamp is going to clamp any better than a worm gear clamp. You would be able to get ...


4

A few comments in addition to David's answer: You can be creative with how the vacuum hose is closed off Something as simple as a bulldog clip will do - the purpose is to seal off one end. Another more permanent solution would be to remove the hose and weld the nipple shut Don't forget the other holes resulting from a smog pump delete There are other ...


4

tl dr: Could you? Probably. Should you? No. Engines with a return line need to have it intact or you will be creating over pressure on the entire fuel system. This would cause you to dump more fuel into the engine, plus cause the fuel system components to be overworked, which could lead to other failures. If any part of the system is weak, it would most ...


4

Those are heater hoses. They supply hot antifreeze to the heater core so that you have heat in the truck.


4

If you are in dire need for a replacement on the cheap, either way you suggested would work just fine. In fact, if you used fuel line (or any other rubber based line which fits over the hard plastic), you probably wouldn't even need to secure it. The right sized hose would secure it self. The hard line just has to slide into the hose, so the same inside ...


3

That cap is the Purge control. The cap will come off if you are super careful, it just snaps on. There will be a diaphragm and spring under the cap. I fix broken nipples with small hose connectors. I choose one that is smaller than the hole in the cap. Drill out the old nipple to the size into which the hose connector can be pushed in. Add a little glue and ...


3

You don't say the specific engine in your car but assuming it's one of the 1.9 TDI's, I'd say it's definitely a bad idea to run with the fuel return "to air" or blocked. I have a 2003 Bora (Jetta IV) 1.9 TDI PD130 which has a "fuel cooler" fitted in the fuel return line under the front floor pan. Doing some research on this, I discovered the reason it's ...


3

Spring style hose clamps are typically fabricated from steel alloy and plated with zinc for corrosion protection. Aluminum would not be a good choice for spring clamps due to low elastic limits and cost. Forming an aluminum spring would also require heat treat and tempering after forming then corrosion protection such as anodizing, all adding more cost. ...


3

Probably should be a comment, but I'm too long-winded: if the hose (automotive) is really difficult to get off, with corrosion "welding" the rubber to the fitting... It's time to replace the hose. Once you have the new one in hand, you don't care so much about damaging the old one. On the other hand I'm the silly cheap type that rinses and dries toilet ...


3

As GdD says, you can't drive it, at all, without coolant - it will overheat in a matter of minutes (if not less) and destroy your engine. If it is just sitting there, it does not need to have coolant in, it can sit empty. It's worth having a look underneath to see if you can see where the coolant is coming from - it may just be a loose or split hose that ...


3

Typically the only hoses which need to be special (rather, something other than just rubber) are fuel lines. These are usually reinforced with some form of fiber, like a polyamid (nylon) or sometimes steel or other metal mesh to increase their structural integrity. Fuel lines are generally under considerable pressure. Fuel lines also have special rubber in ...


3

WD-40 has 1000's of uses!! (if you listen to their marketing...) But really, it is safe for rubber and one thing they call out on their website. Keeps weather stripping and rubber car door seals soft and prevents drying and cracking. Ok, it's not specifically about hoses, but it is about being safe for rubber. WD40 is just a penetrating oil spray - it'...


2

I was fighting with a stuck rubber hose on my car when it just popped into my head that I had a heat gun in the trunk. I had loaned it out to my brother and he was just returned it to me. It was the kind of gun you would use to scrape paint. I tried it on the hose. I moved it around a lot and just tried to get it to soften the hose up. It worked great. ...


2

Boil kettle. Submerge fitting and hose end in hot water for 60 seconds, it will pull out like a greased pole from a... If you can't get the fitting submerged, simply pour over the boiled water very slowly for 1-2 mins until the hose is fully heated and softened. If you can't use water, use a heat gun on low and heat the base of the fitting. In the end the ...


2

Regular strap clamps do not work as well. It's common to get cold-flow leakage around them whereas the spring clamps work better across the wide range of temperatures. If you have a strap clamp, you end up overtightening them to try and compensate.


2

Yes to both. The top picture is just a ground to the body from wherever it starts at. You'll find many of them around the car and under the bonnet (hood). Trying to find where it started will be a chore, but shouldn't be too difficult. It's probably on the engine very near by. Use the length of it to search around. You'll know it should connect to something ...


2

I bought one of these for my boat, because marine hoses are notoriously hard to remove (seldom done, and often inaccessible). I gave it to a friend, who had to remove original scupper hoses on his 25 year old boat. He told me it worked great. I am now going to order two more.


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