Hot answers tagged

19

Heat and thermal stress, even at engine bay temperatures, is not generally the cause of copper wire failure. There is "hydrogen embrittlement" for copper but that only really comes into play at 400C+ in hydrogen-rich environments, usually during annealing. Also, the 20-30C higher range from your hotter climate is pretty negligible from copper's point of view....


16

It sounds like the approach to solving your problem so far hasn't been very systematic or "evidence based" – at least the list of parts replaces suggests that the people working on it have been using a "shotgun" approaching, replacing parts in hopes that one (or more) of them will solve the problem. Start off by doing basic checks: Is there hot water ...


12

If your guide pins are stuck, the caliper won't be able to slide properly. With a sliding caliper, when you apply the brake, the piston pushes one pad against the disc (rotor), and simultaneously pushes back against the caliper (Newton's equal and opposite reactions), causing the caliper to slide along the guide pins, and pull the other pad against the ...


10

When you say "embrittlement", are you talking about this? This is a common issue with PVC used as insulation: PVC is brittle by nature an needs plasticizers to be added to it when making cable insulation. Over time, plasticizers evaporate (remember that "new car smell" which gradually goes away?), brittling the PVC. Is there anything that one can do to ...


9

For the majority of brakes, they should be fine after a track day, but the real risks come from significantly overheating the brake fluid, or from stopping with hot brakes and having them cool while parked. This is why at track days it is always recommended that you stop after ten or so laps, if you have standard brake systems, to allow your brake fluid and ...


8

Short answer: It gets REALLY hot - like, way over 100C (decimal). And, as @SolarMike's answer states, the water that the fluid absorbs from the atmosphere likes to vaporize under those conditions. Brake systems are technically closed, sealed systems, but no seal is perfect. Put another way: Heat in the engine bay is a non-issue for brake fluid. All of the ...


8

Sounds like your pads sticking to me. The pad should slide in smoothly ideally they should be so annoyingly smooth so that they fall out if your are not careful. I have had stuck pin and stuck piston before, both resulted in extreme pad wear on one side of the pad, or the back pad in the caliper. I have also had stuck pad, mild uneven wear, noise. In my ...


7

The very short answer is that heat isn't a significant problem for the wire. Heat is a problem for the insulation. So if you have wires failing I think there is something else going on. The problem with dealing with failing insulation is that there isn't much you can do about it – short of rewiring the affected parts. In a modern car that could be a non-...


6

It looks an awful lot like you have diagnosed all of the really hard problems and come up negative. I wonder if you have a simple mechanical problem: is the linkage sound between the hot / cold selector and the flapper valve that forces air past the heater core. From what I hear, the foam around the flapper is also prone to disintegration in humid climates:...


6

My experience, limited to a few very specific configurations is: I've never had rotor warping issues even after a LOT of heat in the brakes (both from track days and also stuck brakes while driving on the express way). I've used generic NAPA rotors, OEM rotors, and fancy heat/cryo treated ones. I can't tell any difference between any of them. They all ...


6

Modern engine preheaters are usually made of flexible heater mats, similar to those used in seat heaters. These are glued to the bottom of the oil pan. This heats the engine oil. This thins the oil allowing it to pump much more quickly which has two effects. 1) The crankshaft spins faster allowing faster start. 2) The oil reaches the bearings much faster....


6

Likely a sticking caliper, if you're ok doing your own maintenance and comfortable with brakes.. Firstly just check your brake fluid level is ok and not too low (NO need to top it up!) we just don't want it to get too low during the next proceedure. If its at least half full that's fine for now. Pull one pad out from troublesome caliper and pump the brake a ...


5

Possible Causes: Coolant Level Thermostat stuck open Heater Control Valve Temperature blend door Plugged heater core Coolant Level Coolant level that's even a little low can affect heater performance. It's near the top of the system so there could be enough coolant to prevent the engine from overheating but not enough to make it through the heater core. ...


5

The cheapest way to do so, would be to add something like this aftermarket accessory. Looking for any in-dash options would likely be more expensive.


5

Ice by itself can have a decent amount of friction. The lack of friction is caused by a thin layer of water that develops between the sliding device and the surface of the ice. As the device slides over the ice it melts the top layer and a thin layer of water comes about. A fast moving tire spins the melted water off the ice faster than it than it can be ...


5

There won't be a fault with the windscreen. If it was drawing excessive current, then the fuse for this circuit would blow. There could possibly be a fault with you alternator, in that it is not able to provide the current being drawn by the windscreen, this will then cause the battery to discharge. Another possibility is that the idle speed control valve ...


5

Any chance the coolant wasn't filled completely and burped? The heater core is the last thing in the system getting coolant as it sits the highest. Also make sure there isn't any air trapped in the system. Use the bleeder screws (open them slightly) and squish the hoses. As has been suggested elsewhere, you told us all the repairs that were done, but not ...


5

I live in a very hot climate. There is no issue in turning on a properly-functioning A/C to its maximum setting at startup. Turning the A/C on activates the refrigeration cycle, which at startup will have the same load on the compressor regardless of the temperature setting selected. This is part of the reason why the cooling effect isn't instantaneous, ...


4

Where is the water leaking from? If it is from any part of the cooling system then yes, your engine's cooling system will not work as efficiently so it will heat up faster. My guess is that clearing out the rust also exposed a leak somewhere in the radiator.


4

If the engine is warm, the air flow through the heater core is off, and one side of the heater core isn't burning hot like the other, then there's a good chance your heater core has debris in it causing it to block. If your thermostat was stuck open, there's a good chance the engine wouldn't be able to come up to temperature especially on a cold day. If it'...


4

A thermocouple merely generates voltage according to the temperature, while an automotive thermostat is basically an autonomous temperature sensitive coolant valve. You can't replace a thermostat with a thermocouple because their functions are completely different. You could replace a coolant sensor with a thermocouple, but resistive sensors are more ...


4

There is no need to continue to run a naturally aspirated car after hard driving. Just shut it off an let it cool down. It is suggested you do this with turbocharged vehicles to give the turbo a chance to spin down and cool down which will help with its longevity. There's nothing in a naturally aspirated engine which needs this type of care.


4

If there is a small amount of water in the brake fluid in the caliper and the brakes are used severely for an extended period the heating can cause the water to change to vapour. The issue is that brake fluid (except dot5) is hygroscopic - that is it absorbs moisture. This happens slowly over time as the brake fluid reservoir has a small vent in it to allow ...


4

As well as the items mentioned in @Orb and @Chris answers, it's also worth checking the flexi hose to the brake for any signs of swelling - sometimes the rubber can perish and swell, causing the hose to behave like a one-way valve - as you press the pedal, there's enough pressure to force the fluid through to apply the brake, but when you release, the fluid ...


3

If the heater hose is hot going into the core, this means there is flow through it. If it wasn't getting flow through it, it wouldn't get very hot ... warm, maybe, but not hot. My suggestion here is it may be the blend door which is not functioning correctly. If you are unsure what the blend door is, it's the piece inside next to the HVAC unit which directs ...


3

Another option that you could look into is getting an engine block heater fitted. Essentially, you plug those into a wall outlet and they warm up the coolant which both helps with cold starts if you're in a cold climate, and you should get warm air out of the heater fairly quickly compared to a car without a block heater.


3

When replacing break pads it is incorrect and bad practice to simply push the piston back in, this will force brake back up into the master cylinder and sometimes even cause it to overflow. Just about everyone disregards this but it is very possible to damage the Master Cylinder this way. The "correct" way to do it is to open the bleeder screw, push the ...


3

Sounds like a failing A/C compressor. Assuming the car has A/C... A/C compressor is used with the defroster to dry the air.


3

I'm thinking @SteveMatthews may be onto something - If the HVAC system is vacuum operated, one of the vacuum actuators is having an issue (ie: leaking). It may be getting adjusted without you having to do anything. When you shift gears, you take your foot off of the "go pedal" (not a gas pedal in this instance because it's diesel power ;-)), which causes a ...


3

First thing to do is check the coolant level, low coolant, even slightly low can affect heater performance. Thermostat stuck open would make the heater air cooler once you started down the road as the increased air flow across the radiator would cool the engine down even more. You could have poor coolant flow through the heater core that gets better when ...


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