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27

It is totally possible. Combustion chambers are quite small and it doesn't take much fluid to fill one up. As the piston goes down during the intake cycle, a vacuum is created and anything in the intake will be sucked in. During the compression cycle, if fluid has been injected it has to go somewhere since it can't be compressed. A little bit of it will ...


25

tl dr: Cylinder heads (commonly just called "heads") are the big piece of metal which caps and seals the end of the cylinder bore. Types of Cylinder Heads: There are three basic types of cylinder heads: Flathead Cylinder Head - These cylinder heads were used on older engines such as the flat-head Ford engines (like seen below). The oval protrusion at the ...


20

Yes. If the engine ingests water, you have a big problem: water is incompressible. When water gets into a cylinder, it will be forced out through the path of least resistance: the head gasket. And that's if you're lucky. If the water isn't squeezed out, you get hydraulic lock and the piston rod will bend or break.


10

A head gasket is a piece of material which is located between the head and the block inside an engine. It is usually made of a material which is softer than the head and block to allow for sealing of imperfections between the two mating surfaces. It also seals ports which transfer oil or coolant between the two parts. Here is a picture of a typical head ...


10

I don't think there's any reason to suspect a head gasket right off the bat like that. The first thing that comes to mind is the electric cooling fans. They are on the car specifically to keep it cool at slow speeds since you don't have natural air flow. Get the car up to temperature, open the hood and wait for the fans to come on. If they come on you ...


10

I've had some cars where simply changing the head gasket was a complete solution, on other cars there has been cylinder head damage which required skimming. On one, I had a melted piston and two bores full of water. The only way to find out is to take the head(s) off.


9

To add to Anarach's answer... There are 4 things around a head gasket - combustion chambers (cylinders), oilways, coolant-ways and the outside air. They can fail between any two (or more) of these, and each has different symptoms. oil-coolant failures will result in one or both being contaminated - look for a mayonnaise-like substance in the oil (though ...


9

with all other factors held constant, is it true that a thicker head gasket is likely to fail? Yes. A thicker head gasket impacts how headbolt torque is distributed between the block and the heads. Take two pieces of bread. Squash them with your hand. Now put cheese and ham inside and squash it again. The first thing to move under the pressure is an ...


9

If it has an engine oil cooler, that is most likely the problem, a faulty oil cooler, some are made into the radiator, others have heater hoses running to a remote oil cooler, and a few I have seen are where the oil filter screws on, the oil cooler has a leak into the coolant side. The reason no coolant is in the oil is because it is a high pressure leak, ...


9

If this is a car you are planning on keeping, I'd highly suggest just paying the money to get it fixed. A stop leak may work for a period of time, but it's only temporary. A couple of things to consider with a stop leak is, it usually works great for keeping the coolant from flowing places it shouldn't, but it doesn't work too good at keeping the exhaust ...


7

Yes, it's possible. Also, the bit you lost that you think may be a leaking pipe is actually being turned to steam and blown out your exhaust. The car runs fine until the engine gets hot enough for the thermostat to open up, at which point exhaust gases are let into the radiator. The details of how/why is a bit long, but this is what happens. How do I know ...


7

Being that I'm mostly done with the job, here are some additional tools that have come in handy, beyond what I originally mentioned: Adjustable (or large, maybe 1-inch) wrenches to grab the hex on the cams and lock in place to break the cam sprocket bolts. 17mm open-end wrench (other people say screwdriver, but the wrench works much better!) to wedge in the ...


7

A few of the main things I can think of.... Higher cylinder pressures put more strain on the combustion ring. Detonation/pre-ignition/pinging, especially on high compression or forced induction engines, can blow out the combustion ring. Warped cylinder head, typically due to overheating. Close proximity ports. There isn't enough gasket material between ...


7

Coolant can definitely leak into the combustion chamber with a blown head gasket. Whether or not this is the cause of your power loss is hard to say. The amount of coolant going into the cylinder varies due to the severity of the head gasket leak. The head gasket itself is an integral part of the compression system in your engine. With a faulty head gasket, ...


7

It would be good to ask the mechanic to explain to you how they are sure that it is the head gasket – head gasket problems often share symptoms with other problems. One way that a head gasket failure could cause overheating would be if the gasket failed between a combustion chamber and the cooling system. Combustion gasses could leak into the water jacket ...


6

The Mercedes M103 engine in your 300CE is a proven design, old enough to demonstrate its longevity—lots of them are running around still with 300,000+ miles on them. The head gaskets are pretty much the only serious weak point. If the engine was not burning excessive oil (more than a quart every 5,000 miles) or showing other signs of extreme wear before ...


6

No, you've got everything you'll need. A head gasket replacement isn't a job that requires lots of specialist equipment. It's mainly a set of wrenches (including a torque wrench) and something to scrape the old gasket off. But it's a long and tedious job. And I can't stress that last bit enough, especially if it's the first time you do it. If you want to ...


6

There are a lot of Quick methods to check the Head Gasket. Coolant leaking externally from bellow the exhaust manifold White smoke from the exhaust pipe Overheating engine Bubbles in the radiator or coolant overflow tank White milky oil Significant loss of coolant with no visible leaks These are usually important points to notice while buying a Used Car.


6

On top of the other 2 answers... To test a head gasket blown between the cylinder and another port, do a leak down test. This pumps air into the cylinder and measures how much is lost. You can listen and look for the source of where the air is exiting. To test the coolant system, do a coolant system pressure test. This is similar to the leak down test. ...


6

It turns out that multi-layer head gaskets can be OEM as well. In this Hot Rod Garage video the presenter makes mention of the LS9 head gasket, which consists of 5 layers. This would seem to indicate that it is possible to have a reliable multi-layer head gasket, so thicker doesn't necessarily mean more failure-prone.


6

There are so many things that could explain slow overheating A compromised head gasket is just one of them. Other (less involved) reasons include: a radiator fan that doesn't turn on when it should low coolant flow (e.g. failing water pump) debris inside or in front of the radiator Without knowing the specifics of your vehicle, you should see loss of ...


6

Welcome to Mechanics SE! A white milky, mayonnaise like substance is indicative of oil and water mixing. This could be down to a failed cylinder head gasket or a failed oil cooler. I'm not sure if your car has an oil cooler but the first thing I'd do would be to have the engine either compression or leak down tested. Either of these tests ought to ...


5

If you are losing coolant (you say you have to add coolant daily), then there are only two places it can go. Either on the ground or in the engine. Check your oil to see if it's a milky color. If it is, then the oil and coolant are mixing and you will need the engine rebuilt. If not, then you probably won't need to replace the engine. Next, does the exhaust ...


5

I figure I'll post my own answer to the question today since it's the end of my 60 day window to request a refund. After all the things I tried, considering the Blue Devil attempt a failure, and starting the process to request a refund, I finally had success; the seal has held for over a month now. What it took in the end was driving 4 hours at 70 mph on a ...


5

In direct answer to your question... no, there's probably nothing you can try before you invest in a head gasket. There are two possibilities here. No, there are three. First is that your motor oil is entering the water jacket through a breach in the head gasket - the motor oil is under higher pressure than the coolant should ever be, so it'd pressurize ...


5

There is nothing wrong, water is a byproduct of gasoline combustion. 2 C8H18 + 25 O2 → 16 CO2 + 18 H2O where C8H18 is the gasoline reacting with oxygen (O2) and giving Carbon-dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) as the byproduct. So, this simply is: 2 * Gas molecules + 25 * Oxygen Molecules → 16 * Carbon Dioxide Molecules + 18 * Water Molecules So the ...


5

Auto Zone's online vehicle repair guides can be found here: http://www.autozone.com/repairinfo/repairguide/repairGuideMain.jsp You'll have to create an account, enter your vehicle and drill down. Curiously it's not found directly under "Engine" but once there, if you look in the left pane you'll see a bullet for "Cylinder Head". A complete list of ...


5

It's not really a complicated job, but it needs a bit of care and attention. This is more of a general guide, as I don't know the details of the Ram engine... Tools Basic Socket set Clicking Torque wrench Workshop manual for your truck (mainly for the torque wrench settings) Assorted spanners, screwdrivers etc. Process Disconnect the battery. Begin by ...


5

Cools at speed, but not at slow vehicle speed. Definitely an engine cooling fan issue. It's either the fan itself or the sending units that tell the fan when to come on. Best bet is to pick up a Multimeter and a manual that tells you the right signals from all the sending units involved (normally an engine temp sender.) I'd recommend either a Haynes or ...


5

You want to back off the valves so you don't damage the head when you pull the head bolts. If you have tension on the valves, you run the risk of warping the head. Likewise, when you put the head on, you want to ensure there aren't any valves which will be causing interference. If there is interference from the valves, this will affect the torque values ...


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