37

With the handbrake on, the rear wheel is not able to rotate. When the foot brake is released the car will try to move forward. This will cause a rotational force on the rear tire. Since the rear tire cannot turn, the rotational force will be transferred to the axle mounting point 'A' which will cause the road spring to compress, hence lowering the car body....


33

No, its up to you No No Assuming it is an automatic transmission using park is safe, there is a park pawl in the transmission that mechanically locks the output shaft, actually better than a parking brake. The slight roll forward (or backward depending on incline direction) is normal for an automatic park pawl, the movement of the car rotates the output ...


32

You are not likely to have caused any damage in this situation. If you had driven 25 or 30 km with the handbrake on then yes there would be damage.


21

I'm assuming »conking the car« means that the motor stalled? You should be fine. The usual risks from driving with the handbrake are to leave it on for longer so that it overheats (which can cause a fire). Just getting out of a parking spot and starting to drive should not have any lasting effects on the handbrake or your clutch (the latter of which may be ...


19

According to Wikipedia, this is not advisable: Most vehicle manufacturers and auto mechanics do not recommend using the transmission's parking pawl as the sole means of securing a parked vehicle, instead recommending it should only be engaged after first applying the vehicle's parking brake. Constant use of only the parking pawl, especially when parking ...


19

When you stop the car using the footbrake, all four wheels are held stationary by the brake. When you apply the handbrake, this locks the rear wheels only (in most cars) - as you then release the footbrake, this releases the front wheels, allowing them to turn ever so slightly. Gravity is still trying to pull the whole car downwards, and so it settles down ...


13

Putting the transmission into "Park" engages the "parking pawl" - essentially a metal pin that locks the output shaft of transmission (and thus the driven wheels) in place. As to why it exists - it is intended as additional roll-away protection that complements (rather than replaces) the handbrake (which, as the name implies applies actual brakes - usually ...


9

Pulling the hand brake without pushing the button has no effect on the service life of the parking brake. The only thing that will wear is the ratcheting lock mechanism, and I doubt you could wear it out. The purpose of the button is to release the locking mechanism. These are typically simple tooth and claw ratchets.


8

If you live in the UK, this will fail your annual MoT test. (For the benefit of non-Brits, the Ministry of Transport requires a standard annual roadworthiness test for all vehicles.) Other countries may have similar legislation - YMMV depending on where you are.


7

If the handbrake was on well enough to stop the rotation of a rear tire(s), you may have created a flat spot on them due to wear. If the tires were able to spin, either adjustment of the brakes need to occur, or possibly replacement of friction material may be needed. If enough heat or wear was generated, replacement of the rotor/drum may also be required.


7

I would advise you have the brakes checked over.. Depending on how hard the handbrake was on and how hot everything has been.. You may just have worn down the pads/shoes a little, however a bigger issue is that the braking surfaces themselves have likely been very hot indeed. This can not only glaze the braking surfaces making them less effective, but it can ...


6

All you might be doing is putting the cable under more stress than it needs. The cable will stretch over time. This is normal. It will take a long time for the life of the cable to expire. I remember learning that automobiles automatically adjust for this stretch whenever you back up. Basically, don't hammer the thing unless you really feel you need to. ...


6

It sounds like the parking brake is siezed on, hence no resistance when pulling the lever. It looks like these cars use the same calliper to apply both the foot brake and the parking brake. A common fault with these designs is that the lever on the calliper that the parking brake cable connects to siezes and so the brake doesn't release. It is sometimes ...


6

Simple answer - because that would be a very bad thing! As Chenmunka says, look at Newton's Laws of Motion. Or, if you don't believe them, look at videos of crash-testing - you'll see what happens to the occupants of a car in a very rapid deceleration - it isn't nice... The car stops, quite quickly, but you don't, until you hit a solid thing (like the ...


6

No significant damage has been done. There are two potential areas that can be damaged by extended driving with the park brake on. The park brake shoes/pads will wear prematurely if the vehicle is driven with the brake engaged. The clutch will also suffer some wear as the brake being on will require slipping/riding the clutch on every start. In your case you ...


6

Yes, driving with the handbrake on will cause brake overheating and a burning smell. If done for a long enough period of time it can cause damage to the seals in the caliper, which may require a caliper overhaul or replacement. In most cases though, simply letting it cool off will restore it to normal operation. You'll want to check it for over heating on ...


6

Generally speaking, keeping the parking brake engaged while driving the vehicle will heat your brake pads and potentially wear them down rapidly. If you're not hearing any grinding or squeaking on your brake pads it is PROBABLY not a problem. However, for peace of mind I'd suggest having someone inspect the brake pads for deformity or cracking, just if you ...


5

As you say that the handbrake mechanism is working, perhaps the shoes have just become hard and glazed due to their age and thus less effective. If this is the case there will be far less braking friction if the shoes and drums are not binding against each other as they should during operation. If you're doing the work yourself, and if possible, remove ...


4

So, definitely not a stupid question. As was stated in the previous answer, this does not apply to BMW's alone, but to automobiles in general. In a vehicle equipped with an automatic transmission, it is not really needed to apply the parking brake. The parking pin within the transmission will keep your vehicle in place without issue. Even on slight ...


4

So here's what I've learned in the past couple of days. Apparently there is a simple way of assessing the condition of brake discs/rotors. For every car there is a minimum thickness for the brake discs. Once they get below that thickness it's safe to say that they're past their lifetime. For my specific model (Fiat Punto 2001 Sporting) that thickness is 10....


4

Yes, your parking brake has a return spring. You should be able to goto a local auto parts store to get that and the arm replaced. I also recommend you find another mechanic as most of this information is available on the Internet. Hope this helpful.


4

If the vehicle is an automatic and the transmission is left in park then yes it will be ok. However it is advised that the handbrake is used when the vehicle is parked. If its a manual vehicle, then you should apply the handbrake even if the car is left in gear. Not just when you're around hilly areas either, as strong winds can cause a vehicle to start ...


3

You may find that you have to replace your rear brake friction material sooner than you would otherwise have had to but there should be no adverse or lasting effects so don't worry.


3

Visual Inspection CABLE HOUSING/SHEATH You can follow the brake cable back to the rear of the car. I'm not sure if it goes to the right or left rear. In so doing you can see if it has any damage. A bad kink in it, torn cable housing (if you can see the actual cable in the housing due to damage....that's not good) Parking Break Mechanism The cable ...


3

I want to know if I have done any damage to my car. No, you're fine. In this question, a user asked if driving 1000 meters with the handbrake on had caused permanent damage: I drove with the handbrake on for 1000 metres Our assessment then was that that driver had probably caused plenty of wear to the handbrake but not damage. Since you barely moved, ...


3

This is not BMW specific, but rather automatic car specific. Yes, it is always a good idea to use the handbrake, especially when parking on hills. This is because when you put an automatic transmission in park, the only thing really keeping the vehicle from rolling is the parking pin. Over time, or with enough force in an instance, this could eventually ...


3

The first port of call should be your brake fluid reservoir. The emergency brake light will stay on if the brake fluid level is low (which could happen if your brake pads are wearing thin).


3

There is an adjuster behind the handbrake lever - if you look on the back of the centre console there should be a small removable cover at floor level (I have a feeling this varies by trim level - you might have to remove the console completely), pop this off with a small screwdriver and you should see the adjuster behind it. It consists of a nut on a ...


3

The checks to be performed on a vehicle's handbrake are defined in section 3.1 of the VOSA MOT Inspection Manual. They are pretty rudimentary, essentially checking that there is one, it works on two wheels and doesn't disengage spontaneously. The additional checks for electronic handbrakes above manual handbrakes simply state: 7. On vehicles with an ...


3

If the handbrake sticks on after the car has been in the rain, you need to get the brakes serviced. One reason would be that the rear brake drums are corroded. This should not happen. My car (in the UK) has kept outside all the time, in all types of weather, for nearly 10 years, and the brakes never stick. Even if the brakes do "stick", they usually free ...


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