Hot answers tagged

12

You could do this, but you would not want to. By running current through the surface of the boat, you will induce a voltage potential across it. This voltage potential will cause current to flow from one part of the boat, through the water, to another part of the boat. This will cause electrolytic corrosion, which you definitely don't want.


7

Some sensitive electronic devices need a dedicated ground directly to the battery to cut down on DC line noise, in other words they need a clean as possible DC voltage supply. Some vehicles do not have easily accessible good grounds, so its an installers choice just to go to the battery. Other times the installer is not smart enough to find/determine a ...


5

I don't know if the correct way to word this would be to say that there are "separate circuits" but essentially it helps keep the power clean, and reduce noise. Given the amount of computers and delicate sensors, you want as clean as possible. By allowing for multiple grounds closest to each crucial "noise maker" if you will, you're able to ensure cleaner ...


4

The camera was, most likely well most certainly, grounded via the rca cable with the other camera earth or ground. Don’t rely on this as it will increase “noise” or “interference”, ie the shielding on the rca cable works when both ends ie cameras are earthed or grounded.


4

My hunch is that it's a bad use of the term "common ground." In the 12 V example the trolling motor voltage is assumed to be the same as the rest of the boat, so it is safe to make a direct connection between the boat ground and the trolling motor. In the 24 V scenario, with two batteries in series, I think the concern is that something could go wrong and ...


4

You could do what you are suggesting, but to what end? It seems to me you'd have a much greater chance for something to go wrong. Here are a few things to think about: If you are running your trolling motor off of both, there is the distinct possibility you'll drain both batteries and then you'd be stranded. Keeping them independent will help ensure this ...


4

Sounds like a bad ground. I would install new ground wires. Get some heavy cable (like 2-6 gauge multi strand) and solder some lugs onto it. Wire the battery to body, then that same point on the body to the block. Make sure all spots are nice and clean. Be sure to give yourself some slack


3

I think that your left and center brake filaments have blown. The left and right bulbs will have 2 filaments, one for the tail (side) light and one for the brake light. Only the brake filament will have blow in the left one, so allowing the tail light to continue to work. When this brake filament broke, the body control unit (BCU) recognized it and lit ...


2

If all you can get is 16mm² cable, then put two of them in parallel. 2x16mm² would have a lot higher current carrying capacity than 1x28mm² cable. The other thing I would check would be that the new cables had similar thickness strands of copper, so that they have similar flexibility


2

Just to expand on the accepted answer a bit: imagine that you have a sensor, say a temperature sensor, and something power-hungry like the headlamps, both sharing the same ground. All ground connections have a resistance, whether large or small. If our ground point has a resistance of 0.1 ohms, which is not impossible given a corroded terminal bolted into ...


2

There is no problem with joining the two Grounds together. Just make sure that the ground you connect it too has sufficient current capacity but nearly every ground wire in the vehicle will be able to carry the current required for two lights. Assuming both bulbs draw 21w so 42w in total (which is an over estimation) and your truck is 12v then the current ...


2

So, you measure 12.5V between the negative battery terminal and the chassis/motor block? There should be no voltage, or not more that a few 100mV, otherwise, there is something terribly wrong with the ground wire / ground connection. (Or you have one of that ancient cars with the chassis connected to the positive battery terminal) If you have such an old ...


2

Avoiding sparks near the battery is the main reason for the common advice to make the last connection to ground away from the battery on the vehicle with the dead battery. It is best to make this connection directly to the engine or to some sturdy metal part bolted to the engine. The reason for this is because the starter is mounted on the engine and the ...


1

That, as an earth or ground, should be sufficient as long as there is metal to metal contact, ie the paint is removed. Try testing a direct earth to the battery with a long cable, if there is no change then that is not your problem. The problem for low sound level is most likely due to an input error (possible cable faulty) or an error on the settings for ...


1

The points in green are those that are for use with extra equipment that you may want to fit dvd, cd changer, cameras front & rear etc etc They provide these as if you drill holes in the metal body you affect the paint treatment and therefore the warranty protection - if the vehicle is out of the warranty then that is not so much of an issue...


1

Follow the money. My background is working at an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) in Detroit as an automotive design engineer and program manager. Electrical wiring is expensive. While there are some technical requirements (avoid ground loops, accessibility, performance and radiated energy) often the driving question is: Will the manufacturer save ...


1

With only the two lights, you should be just fine attaching them to a single ground point. You can ground quite a few wires before you need to worry about overloading a ground point ... and when you do it's because you have too many on a bolt and cannot fit anymore. If you are running two wires into one wire, then attaching the single wire to the ground ...


1

The batteries with shared current in parallel at 12V have common V- (gnd) and common V+ , by definition of parallel. The two 12 V batteries in series to a 24V trolling motor might have current surges with some voltage drop in the cables and act like antenna for RF noise and disturb main battery by conducted noise, such as an AM radio or ultrasonic sensor. ...


1

The main reason is flexibility as the environment the wire is in is subject to varying mechanical stresses and continuous vibration. It's ok to rejoin the wire as a temporary measure but a repair and any shrink wrap will increase its rigidity and induce weak points elsewhere in the wire which will not last. In my opinion as the wire has broken in two ...


1

On my 70 C20 with a 350, the ground wire goes to the A/C bracket. Any place unpainted on the head or block should be fine.


1

I don't know what year of Cutlass you have, but these can be attached to the bolt which goes through the case of the alternator (the one the alternator pivots on). This allows for a good ground to the engine and to the alternator. You also want to ensure there's a good body ground in there somewhere. There's usually a smaller wire which is attached to the ...


1

Well guess what, I ended up paying 200$ for an auto place to ridicule me. As I stated in the OP, I had changed the huge ground on the passenger side motor mounting bracket, but I put a subwoofer ground cable: 6mm enveloppe, 4mm wire diameter, which is wayyy too thin! Therefore, not enough amperage was passing through. I feel like an idiot now. Never replace ...


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