6

It sounds like a steering angle sensor issue. The ESP/ABS ecu uses the steering angle sensor to determine where you are pointing the steering wheel. It then looks at each wheel speed value, it can determine what direction the vehicle is traveling in by the wheel speeds, if this is different to the steering angle sensor the ESP kicks in. What can happen is ...


5

The height from the ground to the bottom of the ball will be determined by the trailer you're pulling, not the car. The height of the trailer is such that the trailers hitch is horizontal with the ground, while the hitch receiver on all vehicles is attached to two points on the frame of the car, so the receiver height is fixed for the car - e.g my Subaru ...


4

Same problem, but another forum suggested that the key in their 98 GC can be removed one click past the OFF position, in the ACC on position. Sure enough, I checked mine and found the battery drain was due to the key switch being left in ACC and then being removed. The key shouldn't come out there but it does. I screwed a small metal bracket to stop the ...


4

Looking at the routing it may work with a shorter belt. But it may not have enough tension to drive the water pump without slipping. Dorman may make an A/C delete pulley/bracket. Which would keep the original belt routing and length.


3

Going only from the information here, I'd say there were two issues going on. Firstly, I'd say that the brake job was done incorrectly/badly. A squeaky noise when you apply the brakes is often because the mechanic didn't put any copperslip or similar hi temperature grease on the back of the brake pads (not the bit touching the caliper!). The 'not stopping ...


3

It sounds as if the intake manifold is not sealed properly. The large intake leak will force the engine to redline instantly once started.


3

Wow I can't believe the basics are totally not listed here. First of all, since you know its draining the battery, disconnect the battery, charge it, then check to see if it is still draining on its own. Saying that for anyone that hasn't tried that first to double check the battery itself. Then there are the basics. The alternator check: you can use a ...


3

I know this is an old forum, but I need to comment. I have a 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo that I bought for my daughter to use. The battery was brand new when I got the Jeep, but soon after purchasing it I would find if it sat a few days without driving it the battery would be completely dead. I searched online, asked my mechanic friends and didn't hear ...


3

This good answer has a list of all Jeep OBDI codes, pulling out the relevant ones we have: 12 memory to controller has been cleared within 50-100 engine starts 27 injector control circuit does not respond to control signal 54 camshaft reference circuit not detected 55 end of message 12 and 55 are not errors, 27 and 54 are, so concentrate on them. This ...


3

I doubt you want to hear this, but really, the responsibility is yours. You are the owner and maintainer of the vehicle. As the owner, you cannot expect the dealership or manufacturer of the vehicle to check the oil for you, nor any other part of the car. This is incumbent upon you to keep things going and to realize if there is a basic issue with the ...


3

The way to read the codes on your Jeep when they are flashing is, consider them blocked into two digit numbers. You'll get the first digit flashed, short pause, then the second digit. If there is more than one code, there will be a longer break, followed by the next code. Your string of codes break down into: 12. 53, 31, 32, 42, & 55. This website ...


2

I have found that many times a U-joint in the early stages of failure will still pass the hand powered tug and twist test. It may be one or several damaged rollers that cause the clicking. The only sure method is to disconnect the suspect shaft and pivot the joint by hand to feel for any binding. You can try to isolate which joint is bad by driving slowly ...


2

I can say the easy way for you is to get a low amp tester. Remove the negative cable of your battery, connect the tester to the negative side of the battery and to the negative cable of vehicle. The light will come on if there is a drain somewhere. If there is, remove fuses 1 at a time. Every time you remove a fuse, check the light. If it goes out then you ...


2

Check the master cylinder fluid level. If it is low or empty you have a leak. If the reservoir is full the likely cause is a bad master cylinder. To find the leak fill the master cylinder and pump the brake pedal several times. you should see it drip. depending on where the leak is you may have to crawl under the vehicle and look for a wet spot or stain.


2

Certainly the issue would probably have to do with the last change made to the system. I'm sure this doesn't escape you. You will need to test for parasitic drain if you want to nail the issue down. If you are unfamiliar with using a multimeter, here is a general howto on it's use and various functions. Multimeter - Basic Functionality and Howto Here is ...


2

As Moab pointed out, your issues are very "generic", meaning there's a number of things that could be causing them. Here's what you do: When the check engine light comes on, it means the computer has found something wrong with something and has stored a trouble code in it's memory to tell you what it found. Most car parts stores will read these codes for ...


2

It looks as though the Grand Cherokee has a clutch fan. If so, this could be locking up and causing the noise. When fully locked, it can make quite a racket as well as putting a drag on the engine.


2

Regarding the O2 sensor codes. Check fuse 16 in the under hood fuse box. It's likely to be blown. The only point all four sensors have in common is the fuse. If the fuse tests good I'd pull up the fuse box and find the two wires that go to each O2 heater circuit. They'd be crimped together on one terminal. If that checks out then next would be the downstream ...


2

If I remember correctly, the radio system in Jeeps are closely tied to the security system in the vehicle. It has something to do with the door chimes, air bags, and parts of the security (incl your remote start). When the thief removed your radio, they probably killed/disabled the remote start since the way that it's all connected requires your radio to be ...


2

Cooling system problems suck to diagnose because you can't see inside. No heat can be caused by three things no heat, no flow, other. The no heat part is easy. If the engine is not hot then you have no heat. This does not seem to be your problem. No flow is much more difficult. Anything that restricts flow in the heater core will kill the heat. This ...


2

You will get this effect from warped front brake disks. Disks can become quickly warped by getting them hot from heavy braking then driving though water which cools them quickly. You will need to get the disks replaced.


1

Has a JEEP mechanic looked at it, rather than a shade-tree mechanic? (note: I'm more the latter than the former!) It sounds like you have torque-bind. Given that you have automatic 4WD, I'd lean towards the viscous coupler being the cause rather than a transfer solenoid (cos you don't have a 4WD switch on the dash) Changing the fluid sometimes works, but ...


1

The pressure sensor does not control flow - it just "reads" the pressure to give you a value on the gauge. The overly dirty (or probably thin) oil may have caused the loss of pressure as the pressure relief valve is designed to work with an viscosity range and if it is too thin may not keep the minimum pressure required. As to damage or possible breakdown -...


1

Normally, the center differential should cope with the difference in tire diameter. If you lock the center diff for on-road driving, you could get problems.


1

Every Most electrical circuits in the car should be protected by a fuse. There are commonly two fuse panels, one under the hood with some large fuses, and one somewhere in the cabin with some smaller fuses. You can check your owners manual for the location of these panels, and an explanation of which fuses are connected to which components. If you don't have ...


1

I would check the supply fuse for that circuit as a first step.


1

The 21 issues has been observed by others in the past on a couple different jeep engines running OBD1. As the numbers are flashed in increasing values it is extremely unlikely it is a second 21 with it being out of place if it is an engine code.. Every reported double 21 has been a miss read to my knowledge. It is listed in various manuals for OBD ...


1

Here's what your trouble codes mean: P0135: O2 sensor heater circuit (bank 1, sensor 1) P0141: O2 sensor heater circuit (bank 1, sensor 2) P0155: O2 sensor heater circuit (bank 2, sensor 1) P0161: O2 sensor heater circuit (bank 2, sensor 2) It sounds like all 4 of your O2 sensors are failing for the same reason, and I find that hard to believe. What is ...


1

Uncle google just told me that an airbag related sensor (most probably the one that detects if somebody is sitting on the passenger seat) needs calibration. I only can recommend you to take the car to dealership.


1

Sensor, Bad Ground, PCM reprogramming recall? McDonald's battery & alternator check. Most of this can't be done by a regular mechanic. Drive it, drive it, drive it right up to a dealer shop tech and see if they can shed some light (while it's occurring) Mine came on intermittently without similar problems and was fixed by a reflash of the PCM(under ...


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