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8

While I agree that Solar Mike's answer is a possibility, you. might check the simple and inexpensive things first. Try changing the transmission oil/fluid. Sometimes this works wonders especially on an older/high-mileage car. Check the shift linkage for wear, damage, or misalignment. Adjust or replace as needed.


3

I know this is an old thread, and there have been a number of responses to it already, but I thought I'd chip in with something positive on the subject. This is assuming your helmet has received a minor impact, such as dropping it from the seat or the bars, and we're not talking about obvious damage sustained from a more serious impact. We probably all know ...


3

I learned to drive in a 1990 Peugeot which quite commonly did this. First off, as there is no grinding of gears, it is likely that the cogs in the gearbox are not turning when you are trying to engage them. The second thing to keep in mind is that you are talking about automotive technology which is now over 30 years old and therefore doesn't have as much of ...


2

As long as you don’t over-rev the engine and push it past the red line, there should be no need to worry about wear or damage to the engine. It is only the clutch that you are going to be shortening the life of.


1

Things that may have similar effects: Clutch cable (if cable-operated) misregulated or near-breaking. Clutch hydraulic cylinders and tubing leaky. The master cylinder can leak back into the hydraulic fluid tank and this can be completely undetectable. Both of the above can be temperature-dependent because the clutch disk somewhat swells when repeatedly ...


1

If a seal in the clutch master or slave cylinder is worn, air can enter the clutch hydraulic line. The effect on operation would seem the same as what happens when you don't depress the clutch pedal far enough, i.e., hard shifting into first or reverse. It could also get worse in a hot vehicle because heat would cause a bubble of air to expand and seem like ...


1

When you engage the clutch without easing off the throttle a bit, the engine rpm can rise rather quickly. When you then release the clutch that higher engine speed is then felt by the clutch plates as excess wear. The correct technique, and this takes some practice but will soon become second-nature, is to simultaneously engage the clutch and ease off the ...


1

I had my 2002 Jeep Wrangler sounding like it had straight cut gears just a bit ago. I changed the gear oil and it's now quiet again. I went ahead and changed the front and rear diffs and transfer case while I was at it too since they were all overdue. It's amazing how loud gears can be with old gear oil.


1

Quick fixes - Sorry I do not know the specifics of this vehicle but here are two universal tips for easier driving on this era of manual transmission without making repairs. Reverse - A lot of manual transmissions don't have synchronizers for reverse. This means it is up to you to effectively get the gear aligned with the shaft, but it's easy. Take your foot ...


1

A failed engine mount could possibly cause this symptom. You could get someone to watch the engine as you select drive and reverse while stationary with the brakes on. If the engine moves excessively then it is likely an engine mount. Make sure the spectator stands to the side of the vehicle, not in front of it.


1

It's probably fine provided it was OK when you bought it. Most modern cars, and this one is no exception, have an ECU engine controller which incorporates a MAX rpm limiter. So you are very unlikely to have exceeded the engine's maximum rpm. I'd check the basics at this point, engine oil level, transmission oil level, coolant level and see if anything is ...


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