5

After reading the op's question again, following being prompted to by the comment below from @Gargravarr, I realised I needed to update this answer. I believe that the real reason that selecting 1st can be difficult while the car is stationary is due to the way in which the locker ring in the syncromesh operates. The locker ring is designed to stop a gear ...


3

To me, it sounds as though the issue lies with either a stiff gear linkage or an issue with the adjustment or alignment of the gear linkage. I did a quick google search to see if I could track down the linkage adjustment guide specific to your vehicle but instead found links to forums and groups indicating you may not be alone; here is an example thread.


3

Here's a link to an article that describes what you're looking for in detail. http://auto.howstuffworks.com/transmission.htm What the gearbox does is allow the engine to run at the RPM range that it is most happy, while allowing your wheels to run at the speed which you desire. It does that through a collection of gears who's ratio determines how fast the ...


3

Some gear knobs are threaded, some are a friction fit, others are pinned. If it is pinned you may well have "hidden" the pin with the damage you have done... Threaded ones can be very tight - depends how strong you are, friction fits can also be tight but I have always managed to remove them.


2

Which way did you try to turn the nut? I don't know what car this is so it's a bit of a wild guess, but I'm inclined to say that the nut is a locking nut/jam nut. Meaning that you are supposed to turn it clockwise (when looking at it from above) in order to loosen the gear knob. The point of the jam nut is to load up the threads under the gear knob to make ...


2

The problem was that the handle on the gear-stick was loose. There is a linkage inside the shaft of the gear-stick that gets pushed down when the driver presses the button on the gear-stick (unlocks the gear-stick). The handle had become loose, due to the set-screw becoming partially unscrewed. This meant that the handle/button did not fully engage the ...


1

Undo the locknut, move the locknut down and then easily turn the gear knob to the correct height. Then use the locknut to secure the knob position. You can use the correct sized spanner for the locknut and you should not need a visegrip on the knob. Unless you are trying to force the knob and locknut to turn at the same time - this may well damage something,...


1

Until the knob is released you can manage the wet carpet. Get a good, strong wet-dry vacuum cleaner and remove as much water as you can. Then use a sponge to saturate the carpet with (a warm water/drops of detergent/drops of bleach) solution. Then vacuum it all up and repeat several times. The idea is to get a few drops of bleach and detergent throughout the ...


1

That the gearbox is in a gear, and cannot be shifted into neutral, indicates that a) either the linkage that connects the gearshift lever to the transmission is broken or jammed, or b) something is broken or jammed within the gearbox itself. Problem a) is probably solvable if the linkage can be exposed and worked on. This will depend upon the design of the ...


1

Removing the gearknob on a Vectra C is literally a case of pull upwards. Some are really stiff, some are really loose. My Signum (based on the same model) is so loose it likes to slide off when the weather gets hot Be careful when you do as there is a spring that sits between the lifter and the gearknob.


1

Your clutch lever probably isn't adjusted right. The symptoms you described lead me to think your clutch isn't fully engaged when you pull in the lever all the way. Try to adjust it so the clutch engages earlier in the pull (So farther away from the handlebar).


1

With my Toyota Aygo we had sort of the same Problem. You could only order 2 parts: The actual gear leaver assembly and the shift cables. You should identify what´s actually the problem: Is the lever damaged, so the link/cable does not attach, or is the connecor on the link damaged/missing a clip? Try typing into google your make and model and "shift ...


1

Just guessing from the picture, that the plastic shaft is approximately 8mm in diameter. So, why not drill the chromed button and either tap a thread into it then glue a cut-down bolt or glue a hard plastic shaft into it?


1

Replacing the shifter is probably the only "proper" fix you can make. If it were me, I would go down the route you suggested - make your own button. There is a really cool product called Sugru that would be ideal. It's essentially modelling clay that hardens into firm rubber in about 24 hours. It bonds really strongly, so will definitely stay put. Make sure ...


1

The answer I've been told, because my '85 Supra suffers from this, is that the synchro ring on first gear is worn. The ring is made of brass (a soft metal) to allow it to slip as the synchroniser brings it up to speed during a shift. Since first spins extremely fast relative to the output shaft, you can expect this synchro ring to take the most wear. It can ...


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