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9

Have a look at this picture: From here. Corrosion (the green stuff) can conduct electricity. If one wire in that picture went to the battery positive terminal and the other went to the battery negative terminal, then it would act like a connection between the two. Not quite a short circuit, but not an open circuit either. If the cause of the problem ...


5

The effect of corroded or poorly soldered battery terminals is responsible for excessive voltage drop, not parasitic current drain. They are not the root cause of the parasitic drain.


4

Or will each appliance receive exactly what it asks for? Yes Conversely, if I connected this fuse tap and cigarette lighter instead to a lower amperage, like 10, what would happen if the cigarette lighter asked for 15 amps? It does not ask, it takes, so it would burn the wire supplying the 10 amps, unless it is fuse protected somewhere else. Safest bet is ...


2

Your sense is correct. Battery terminal corrosion is by necessity, a series phenomenon. That is, it can build up resistance, but it is in series with other loads. So unless those loads are flowing current, the terminal itself cannot. The car, quiescent, should draw a few milliamps for memory "keep-alive" going to computer, radio and clock. Adding ...


2

You say you didn't have time to do a complete diagnosis. I am wondering if you allowed enough time to let all the modules sleep when checking draw. The corrosion repair could have fixed a charging problem, and there may not have been a draw problem. To confirm all you need to do is another draw test after repairs.


2

Probably not. A parasitic drain requires electricity to be flowing, a corroded or badly soldered terminal would not cause a drain unless it somehow bridged the electricity to the car body or some other path. Usually a corroded terminal will reduce power flow. So unless the terminal is somehow in contact with something conductive that isn't the cause of ...


2

A relay is usually supplied by two supplies, one a controlling supply, the other from the battery, either direct or through an ignition controlled circuit. Both need to be fused, which explains why you see three fuses in total. As for the relay, it may be shown on a separate diagram as sometimes the circuits are separated for clarity and also for showing ...


1

It's probably burned out headlights. Cars have 4 sets of lighting filaments: 2 dipped and 2 high beam. Sometimes these can be combined into a single bulb with 2 filaments per bulb, sometimes these are 2 separate bulbs per side. What makes most sense is that the left side has a working low beam filament and burned out high beam and the right side has a burned ...


1

Most likely there is a short circuit somewhere in the tail light circuit in the trailer's wiring, which will be causing the car's fuse to blow. To test this, get hold of a digital multimeter (a cheap DIY shop one will be fine), and set it to continuity mode. With the trailer not plugged into the car, Take the bulb out of the right hand tail light, and test ...


1

Ignore all of this stuff about electronics "asking for" current. The fuse tap is adding a circuit to the fuse box. That's why it contains two fuses. The bottom fuse goes in line with the existing circuit, and the top fuse goes in line with the new circuit that comes off of the fuse tap. In your diagram, the radio amplifier circuit is protected by a ...


1

A fuse is simply a thin bit of wire (or other conductive material) that is designed to fail at a particular amperage in order to protect other elements in the circuit. The fuse doesn't regulate or provide amperage to the circuit. The base of the fuse tap pictured is protected based on whatever fuses you put in it (or it's stated max amperage). However there ...


1

You are probably on the right track, and that's where I would start, keep in mind that any place where water could bridge the wires can be the cause of the short. Other than the assembly this could be: Connectors: modular connectors could be shorted by water. The back of the tail light assembly uses such a connector, but so does the other end of the wire, ...


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