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5

If you are running an inline fuse (which you should), you put it on the power side. This is so you don't overtax the fuse you're tapping off of. To tell which is hot, pull the fuse and check each side for power. Power off of the side you get a reading. And yes, the hot/cold should be same for the entire column ... I'd still check it if I were you though. You ...


4

Or will each appliance receive exactly what it asks for? Yes Conversely, if I connected this fuse tap and cigarette lighter instead to a lower amperage, like 10, what would happen if the cigarette lighter asked for 15 amps? It does not ask, it takes, so it would burn the wire supplying the 10 amps, unless it is fuse protected somewhere else. Safest bet is ...


2

A relay is usually supplied by two supplies, one a controlling supply, the other from the battery, either direct or through an ignition controlled circuit. Both need to be fused, which explains why you see three fuses in total. As for the relay, it may be shown on a separate diagram as sometimes the circuits are separated for clarity and also for showing ...


1

So that inverter is a 150W output model. Assuming it's 90% efficient (that's probably a high guess) that means it takes 167W input. At 12V that is 14A. What's the fuse capacity on your lighter outlet? Most are in the 10-15A range so at 14A you are really close and it makes sense that you will blow the fuse after some time. Fuses are not able to handle ...


1

Most likely there is a short circuit somewhere in the tail light circuit in the trailer's wiring, which will be causing the car's fuse to blow. To test this, get hold of a digital multimeter (a cheap DIY shop one will be fine), and set it to continuity mode. With the trailer not plugged into the car, Take the bulb out of the right hand tail light, and test ...


1

Ignore all of this stuff about electronics "asking for" current. The fuse tap is adding a circuit to the fuse box. That's why it contains two fuses. The bottom fuse goes in line with the existing circuit, and the top fuse goes in line with the new circuit that comes off of the fuse tap. In your diagram, the radio amplifier circuit is protected by a ...


1

A fuse is simply a thin bit of wire (or other conductive material) that is designed to fail at a particular amperage in order to protect other elements in the circuit. The fuse doesn't regulate or provide amperage to the circuit. The base of the fuse tap pictured is protected based on whatever fuses you put in it (or it's stated max amperage). However there ...


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