82

It's a BAD idea! The oil is contaminated with impurities that will not do the fueling system on your car any favors. Further, it's bad for the environment because your car is NOT designed to burn oil even if it's mixed with gasoline. The best thing to do is to take the used oil to a place where it can be recycled into new oil and used again. Most oil ...


13

Aside from the numerous reasons not to do this to your car I would like to offer you a solution to your perceived problem. Don't take the old oil back to the store. At least not right away... Your new oil was purchased in single quarts or a 5-quart jug, right? Put your old oil in the empty containers and recycle it at your convenience. This could be the ...


13

All modern cars scavenge blow-by including oil vapour and a mist of droplets. This is good for upper cylinder lubrication and does extend ring and bore life. If you have to, you can install a catch can to condense steam and larger sludgy solids. Older cars just vented through a wire wool cap on a rocker cover. Used oil is another matter. There is going ...


4

It really does hurt your car. Just think about it, your car isn't made to process this type of liquid, so why would you just dup it in? Its basically like dumping tar in your tank and expecting it to run. Yeah, not exactly good for any of your car parts. Your friend is definitely right that you are lucky you haven't had any real problems! You mentioned that ...


4

I would bet there's an issue with the sensor grounding out when it's installed into the tank due to it staying pegged 100% of the time on the dash.


3

Is there any way to check for physical obstruction? I'm wondering if if the float is getting caught on a baffle that's stopping it from moving through it's full range?


3

Judging by the quality of repair it looks like an failed attempt of an DIY fix. Generally leakages in tanks are fixed by welding, which requires the tank to be drained completely. Epoxy or putty to cover up fuel tank damages is fairly an amateur and dangerous attempt.


2

$5-10 extra for a premium tankful makes this a rather expensive way to dispose of old oil. To say nothing of engine parts such as the cat and O2 sensors. And fuel filters, cringe. If this was literally my only way to do that, I would a) let it sit for a month to settle out metallics and soot, and b) filter it to 5 microns. Then add it at less than a ...


2

The pump cutoff is completely independent of your car, it's based on air pressure and has nothing to do with your gauge. What you describe does sound like a bad fuel level sensor rather than the gauge, usually gauges will stick when they break or just go dead. Your gauge is registering some changes, although it doesn't register full and it reports low fuel ...


1

I would attempt to "plastic weld" the puncture / cracks with a soldering iron. Be careful to fill the tank with water and then have the tank oriented so the area to be repaired is uppermost - this reduces the amount of flammable gas. Once the area has been "plastic welded" then I would reinforce the repaired area with the repair kit for strength. If you ...


1

It depends on what is near the hole; that is, what the exhaust blowing toward. Gas tank and lines, brake lines and electric wire would be especially vulnerable to damage. A header pipe ( manifold to first converter/muffler, etc.) is hotter than an intermediate pipe. While on vacation I got a hole in a header pipe ; I made a crude temporary patch to drive for ...


1

It should be noted (since nobody else did) that your car isn't designed to burn an oil-mix and that cloud of smoke behind your car is polluting the neighborhood. I am surprised you haven't managed to foul your plugs doing this.


1

Interesting approach. Caterpillar issued a TSB probably 10 years ago, which prescribed dilution rates of crankcase oil to fuel for their off road equipment like bulldozers. Of course those are diesel, and they may not have a catalytic converter to deal with. In a gas car, I would likely avoid the issue. However, I will add that a tribologist friend ...


1

Some tank / sender combinations rely on the clamping ring to also provide the ground connection. We had one model of car that had so many issues with this (paint, corrosion) that we would solder an earth point to the sender and run a direct earth to the body. Sorted those fine...


1

I agree with the above. The most likely cause, is the tank not being grounded if the sender only has one cable. The tank may be installed with soft pads between mountings and chassis, so should have a grounding lead somewhere. If the tank relies on the mounting bolts making the connection, they may not, with or without pads. The ground lead is often a second ...


1

I got same problem here on my 2013 CBR 250R too and I fixed it without changing the tank. The filler drain tube that runs through the tank got corroded from inside and opened a hole into the tank leaking petrol down the drain hose. Unfortunately, the hole was on the bottom end so all of my fuel gets drained. What I did was 1. Scrubbed the rust off using ...


1

There is a MUCH easier way to resolve this issue. I know this post is older, but admins, please advise future repairs to give this much easier method a try. Drop the exhaust on the truck/van, and access to the top of the fuel tank is a breeze. It took me about an hour, and I’m no mechanic, to replace my fuel evap hose on my 2006 Ford F-150. Once the ...


1

The 95% volume is a regulation due to fuel expansion. If you pump fuel from ground tanks (pretty typical) the fuel is coming up the temperature of the ground (45 degrees) and if it is a warm day, the fuel will expand as it warms. Say you drive in a southern environment and the fuel warms to 100 degrees. Every gallon of fuel expands to 1.0253 gallons. ...


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